Bad Science: Quacks, Hacks, and Big Pharma Flacks

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Macmillan, 12/10/2010 - 320 páginas
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Have you ever wondered how one day the media can assert that alcohol is bad for us and the next unashamedly run a story touting the benefits of daily alcohol consumption? Or how a drug that is pulled off the market for causing heart attacks ever got approved in the first place? How can average readers, who aren’t medical doctors or Ph.D.s in biochemistry, tell what they should be paying attention to and what’s, well, just more bullshit?

Ben Goldacre has made a point of exposing quack doctors and nutritionists, bogus credentialing programs, and biased scientific studies. He has also taken the media to task for its willingness to throw facts and proof out the window. But he’s not here just to tell you what’s wrong. Goldacre is here to teach you how to evaluate placebo effects, double-blind studies, and sample sizes, so that you can recognize bad science when you see it. You’re about to feel a whole lot better.
  

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Review: Bad Science

Procura do Utilizador  - Ben Mcfarland - Goodreads

Ben Goldacre is a name I had not heard till I found this book in the staff recommendations for Seattle Public Library. My loss. Goldacre is a science writer from the UK who targets shoddy science in ... Ler crítica na íntegra

Review: Bad Science

Procura do Utilizador  - Simon Wood - Goodreads

HOW TO IMMUNISE YOURSELF FROM DELUSION It seems a bit gratuitous to write the 223rd review (relevant to uk amazon site) of Ben Goldacres book "Bad Science" but having decided that it would be more of ... Ler crítica na íntegra

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Índice

Preface
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
9
10
11
12
And Another Thing
Notes
Further Reading and Acknowledgments
Index

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Acerca do autor (2010)

Ben Goldacre is a writer, broadcaster, and doctor best known for the Bad Science column in The Guardian. Trained in Oxford and London, with brief forays into academia, Goldacre works full-time for the National Health Service.

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