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British province, contained ten counties and only 50,291 inhabitants; in 1771, same counties and 163,338 inhabitants, in 1786, (thirty-three years since,) twelve counties and 238,896 inhabitants; in 1791, sixteen counties and a population of 310,120 souls; in 1800, there were thirty counties, 305 towns (including three cities) and 586,000 inbabitants; at the last general census, in 1810, the num. ber of counties was forty-five; of towns (including four cities) 452; of villages, containing from thirty or forty to 600 houses, 300; with a population of 959,049 souls; giving an increase of fifteen counties, 147 towns, and 373,049 people in ten years! But at the commencement of 1818, the population amounted, by a state census, to no less than 1,486,739 persons; being about nineteen to the square mile, and an increase, in seven years, of 526,739 inhabitants; of whom 112,586 are regularly enrolled in the militia. The following table will exhibit the names of the counties and towns, and the number of in habitants, as taken at the general census. Counties. Townships. Population. ·. Chief Towns & Population,

8...... 34,661...... Albany, 9,356 Allegany ........ 5...... 1,942...... Angelica tp. 439.

Broome .......... 6....... 8,130......Chenango tp. 225 * Cattaraugus .....

Olean tp. 458 Cayuga .......... 22,843...... Auburn tp. 500 * Chataughque .. 2.....,

Chataughque tp. 1,039 Chenango .......14...... 21,704...... Norwich, 225 Clinton ..... ..... 5...... 1,002...... Plaitsburgh tp. 3,112 Columbia ........11 ...... 32,390...... Hudson, 4,048 Courtlandt ...... 6...... 8,869......Homer, 350 Delaware ........14...... 20,303......Delhi tp. 2,396 Dutchess ... .....16... .. 51,363...... Poughkeepsie, 1,800 Essex ............ Il...... 9,477... ... Elizabeth tp. 1,362 Franklin ........ 4...... 2,617... ... Ezraville, 767 Genessee .......10 ..... 12,588....... Batavia, 200 Greene ........... ... 19,536...... Catskill, 1,000 Herkimer ........10...... 22,046...... Herkimer tp. 475 Jefferson ........12 ...... 15,140...... Watertown, 250 Kings ............. 6...... 8,303... .. Flatbush, tp. 1,159 Lewis..

.... 6,433...... Martinsburgh, 150 Madison .........11 ...... 25,144......Cazenovia, 500 Montgomery ...15...... 41,214......Johnstown, 605 New York ...... 1...... 96,373...... New York, 96,373

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Twenty-three. 192 461,978

• Laid out since the census was taken,

NEW YORK,
ADJACENT COUNTRY.

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Counties. Townships. Population. Chief Towns and Population, Brought over 192 461,978 Niagara .......... 4...... 8,971...... Buffalo, 500 Oneida ............26...... 33,972......Utica, 1,500 Onondago ......13.. ... 25,987... ... Onondago, 525 Ontario ........... 24...... 42,032......Canandaigua, 685 Orange ........... .11...... 34,374...... Newburgh, 2,000 Otsegó ............21...... 38,802...... Otsego, 550 * Putpam ............ Queens ............ 6...... 19,336 ..... Northempstead tp.2,750 Rensselaer ......13...... 36,309....., Troy, 2,640 Richmond

5,347....., Richmond, 100 Rockland ........ 4...... 7,758......Clarkstown tp. 1,996 Saratoga

33,141...... Saratoga tp. 3,000

4...... 10,201... ... Schenectady, 2,000 Schoharie ........ 8...... 18,945...... Schobarie, 125 150 Seneca .......... - 16,609... ..Ovid tp. 4,535 Steuben ...........

7,246...... Bath, 250 St. Lawrence ... 12...... 7,885......Ogdensburgh, 350 Suffolk ............ 9...... 21,113......Riverhead tp. 1,711 Sullivan .......... 7..... 6,018...... Thompson tp. 1,300. Tioga ............. 9...... 7,899... ... Spencer tp. 3,128 Ulster .............. 13...... 26,576...... Kingston, 750 *Warren ........... Washington .....21 ...... 44,285...... Salem, 280 West Chester ...21... .. 30,272...... Bedford tp. 2,374

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Forty-seven, 452 959,049.

The city of New York is situated on an island of its own name, formed by the North and East rivers, and a creek or inlet connecting both of these together. The island is fourteen miles long, and, on an average, about one in breadth. The city stands on the south end, closely built from shore to shore, and is in length about two miles and a quarter, in breadth nearly one mile, and in circumference six; the present population (1819) is said to be 120,000. The East river separates it from Long Island, and the Hudson, or North river, from the state of New Jersey ; the latter river is nearly two miles wide, the former is not quite so broad. Ships of any burden can come up to the qnays, and lie there with perfect safety, in a natural har. bour, formed by the above-named fine rivers, and a noble bay, completely protected by the surrounding lands. The city consists of about 17,000 houses, including public edifices and warehouses; and the number is rapidly ina

:. Laid out since the census was taken.

creasing. In the summer of 1818 it was computed that 2,000 new buildings were erecting, and most of them large and elegant; the houses are generally built of brick, with slated or shingled roofs. Within the city wooden houses are not allowed ; but in the environs they are general ; and being commonly two stories high, painted white, with green shutters, many of them are very handsome,

The plan of New York is not regular, several of the streets in the old part of the town being too narrow, and some of them crooked; but all the modern part is built with much better taste, and most of the new streets are uncommonly elegant. Broadway is the finest street in the city, and from its great beauty and importance, merits a particular description. It commences at the Battery, on the south-east point of the city, and runs in a north-east direction about two miles and two furlongs, where it forms a junction with the Bowery road, which is 100 feet wide, and is connected with the road leading to Boston. The breadth of Broadway, including the side-pavements, is about eighty feet, and it is regular throughout its whole length. It is ornamented with rows of poplar trees on each side, and a number of public buildings are situated on it; particularly the custom-house, Trinity church, St. Paul's church, the mechanics' hall, the hospital, and the edifices for the city business. The street rises by a gradual ascent about half a mile, and is at its greatest elevation opposite to the city buildings. Greenwich-street is next in importance; it commences also at the Battery, and running due north about two miles, connects the city with the village of Greenwich. Pearl-street is one of the most important in the city, in point of trade; it rises likewise near the Battery, and runs parallel with East river to Cherry-street; from thence it runs to the northward, and joins Chatham-street, from which it has been extended to Broadway. Cherry-street is a continuation of Pearl-street, aud runs along the East river, till it is terminated by a bend in that river. The other principal streets are Wall, street, where most of the banks and public offices are situated; Chatham-street, on which the theatre stands; Front-street, Water-street, and Broad-street.

That part of the city which has been recently laid out upon East river, is constructed on a very handsome plan; the streets crossing each other at right angles, and there. are several public squares: but of these there are by far too few in the city, and they are hardly worthy of notice. The Battery, already mentioned, is a fine piece of ground, commanding an elegant view of the bay, islands, and

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