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OF THE

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,

WITH THE

CORRESPONDENCE, THEREWITH COMMUNICATED, BETWEEN THE SEC.

RETARY OF WAR AND OTHER OFFICERS OF THE GOVERNMENT,

ON THE SUBJECT OF

THE MEXICAN WAR.

WASHINGTON:

WENDELL AND VAN BENTHUYSEN, PRINTERS.

1848.

THIRTIETH CONGRESS_FIRST SESSION.'

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

MEXICAN WAR CORRESPONDENCE.

MESSAGES

OF THE

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,

AND THE

Correspondence, therewith communicated, between the Secretary of

War and other officers of the government upon the subject of the Mexican war.

APRIL 28, 1848. Resolved, That 10,000 extra copies of the President's message and the correspondence therewith transmitted on the 20th March last; and also 10,000 extra copies of the message of the President of the United States of the 25th of April instant, (and the following day laid before the House,) with the accompanying documents; and also 10,000 extra copies of House document No. 196, 1st session, 29th Congress; House document No. 119, 2d session, 29th Congress, and House document No. 37, 1st session, 30th Congress; also, House docu: ment No. 19, 2d session, 29th Congress; House document No. 25, 1st session, 30th Con. gress, and Senate document No. 18, 1st session, 30th Congress-the same comprising all the correspondence between the Secretary of War and other officers of the government upon the subject of the war, so far as the same may have been made public, be printed for the use of the House.

HOSTILITIES BY MEXICO.

MESSAGE

FROM THE

PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,

RELATIVE

To an invasion and commencement of hostilities by Mexico.

May 11, 1846. Read, and referred to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

To the Senate and House of Representatives :

The existing state of the relations between the United States and Mexico renders it proper that I should bring the subject to the consideration of Congress. In my message at the commencement of your present session, the state of these relations, the causes which led to the suspension of diplomatic intercourse between the two countries in March, 1845, and the long-continued and upredressed wrongs and injuries committed by the Mexican government on citizens of the United States, in their persons and property, were briefly set forth..

As the facts and opinions which were then laid before you were carefully considered, I cannot better express my present convictions of the condition of affairs up to that time, than by referring you to that communication.

The strong desire to establish peace with Mexico on liberal and honorable terms, and the r.adiness of this government to regulate and adjust our boundary, and other causes of difference with that power, on such fair and equitable principles as would lead to permanent relations of the most friendly nature, induced me, in September last, to seek the reopening of diplomatic relations between the two countries. Every measure adopted on our part had for its object the furtherance of these desired results. In communicating to Congress a succinct statement of the injuries which we had suffered from Mexico, and which have been accumulating during a period of more than twenty years, every expression that could tend to inflame the people of Mexico, or defeat or delay a pacific result, was carefully avoided. An envoy of the United States repaired to Mexico, with full powers to adjust every existing difference. But

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