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HEAD-QUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, August 20, 1846. Sir: In the numerous volunteer corps now in the service of the United States, vacancies in commissions, by resignations, deaths and otherwise, will probably occur.

The commissions of volunteer officers cannot properly be accepted by any functionary of the United States. You may, however, grant discharges from the service of the United States, "honorable” or otherwise, according to conduct in that service, upon the presentation of such circumstances as may appear to you of grave interest to the officers themselves, or to the public service.

Vacancies in volunteer commissions, up to the rank of colonel inclusive, however created, may be filled in accordance with the laws of the States to which the discharged or deceased officers respectively belonged. Those laws may prescribe elections, or promotions by seniority. In the former case, you may announce in orders the vacancies to be filled, and appoint the times of election. Where the principle of promotion prevails, the next in rank may be put in orders to act in the higher places (as also in the case of elections) until the pleasure of the governor or governors interested can be made known in the form of commissions. Hence it will be necessary to cause to be reported to the particular governors the discharges, deaths, elections and promotion's which may occur among the officers in their respective corps.

A similar letter is addressed to Brigadier General Wool, with this addition:

“Considering your remoteness from the general head-quarters of the army against Mexico, but without intending to withdraw you from the command of Major General Taylor, you are authorized to act in the matters presented above, while you shall remain at a considerable distance from him." I remain, sir, with high respect, your most obedient servant,

WINFIELD SCOTT. To Major General Z. TAYLOR,

Commanding army against Mexico. To Brigadier General Wool,

San Antonio, Texas. To Brigadier General KEARNY,

Santa , Mexico.

B.

No. 1.

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, May 7, 1846. GENERAL: Pursuant to the instructions of the Secretary of War, orders have this day been despatched-to Brevet Major Beall to proceed with his company from Austin to join the squadron now encamped near San Antonio de Bexar, under the command of the lieutenant colonel.

I acknowledge the receipt this day of your despatches Nos. 26 and 28, respectively, dated the 21 and 15th of April; “orders” Nos. 37, 38, 44, 46, 47, and 48; and “special orders” Nos. 39, 40, 41, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. JONES,

Adjutant General.. Brevet Major General Z. Taylor, Commanding Army of Occupation,

Camp opposite Matamoras, Texas.

No. 2.

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, May 8, 1846. GENERAL: In obedience to the instructions of the Secretary of War, I enclose herewith a copy of the “ Daily Union of the 7th instant, containing certain resolutions offered yesterday to the House of Representatives by the Hon. J. Q. Adams, under the head of " desertions from the army," and also the debate which follows thereon. As it is probable the resolutions will pass the House; with a view, in that event, to enable the President to answer the call with the least delay, you are requested to transmit, at as early a day as possible, the names and description of all deserters who may have been killed in the act of desertion from your command, with a special report of all the orders and instructions, if any, issued to any officer or non-commissioned officer relative thereto, and all the circumstances connected with the subject, so as to enable the department to understand the character of the transaction, and furnish such information as may be required in relation to it. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. JONES,

Adjutant General. Breyet Brigadier General Z. TAYLOR, Commanding Army of Occupation,

opposite Matamoras, Texas.

NOTE.-In connexion with the foregoing I send you a copy of my report of the 5th instant, in answer to a previous resolution of the Hon. Mr. Adams.

R. JONES, A. G.

29

No. 3.

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, May 12, 1846. General: A bill for increasing the number of privates in all our regiments to one hundred per company having become a law, it is desirable to increase our force on the recruiting service, general and special.

Accordingly, the general-in-chief directs that you will immediately (as soon as active operations on the Rio Grande may allow you the necessary time) select one or two companies of each regi. ment of artillery, (other than Ringgold's and Duncan's,) and three or four of each of the other regiments with you, to be broken up, and transfer all the privates from such companies to the remaining companies of their respective regiments. Lieutenants, the musicians, and half the non-commissioned officers, may also be transferred to fill vacancies, taking the most efficient for field service, other than 1st sergeants. So, also, of artillery artificers, and the remainder, if any, temporarily attached to the companies of their respective regiments.

The companies left blank by transfers you will send to the points designated below, where they will find instructions from this office;

The blank companies of the 2d dragoons and 4th regiment of artillery to Baltimore;

The blank companies of the 3d regiment of artillery and 5th of infantry to Pniladelphia;

The blank companies of the 2d artillery and Sth infantry to New York;

The blank companies of the 1st artillery and 7th infantry to Boston; and

The blank companies of the 3d infantry to Newport, Kentucky. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. JONES,

Adjutant General. Brevet Brigadier General Z. TAYLOR,

Commanding the Army in Texas.

No. 4.

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, May 25, 1846. GENERAL: I am directed by the Secretary of War to say, as it is quite probable, and highly desirable, that many of those patriotic volunteers from Louisiana and other States who have sailed from New Orleans, or who may be assembling to follow, under the requisitions and calls suddenly made in that quarter, may, from the same patriotic ardor, be willing to re-enrol themselves, under the act of the 13th instant, as twelve-month volunteers, that you be, and you are accordingly requested to invite them to do so; and that you cause all such as may consent to be enrolled in companies and regiments, giving credit for the time passed under their first hasty enrolment.

Previous to the new act (May 13) there was no legal authority for requiring or accepting the services of volunteers for a period exceeding three months; and any enrolment prior thereto, for a longer time, cannot, of course, be enforced, though it is probable most of those who volunteered for six months will consider themselves bound for that term.

It is of great importance, however, to secure the services of the volunteers now with you for the longest legal period, (twelve months,) and you are accordingly requested to use every proper effort to accomplish this desirable object.

The Secretary of War will correspond with the governors upon this subject, and request their co-operation in effecting the arrangement herein proposed. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, ,

R. JONES, Adjutant General. Brevet Brig. General Z. TAYLOR, Commanding Army of Occupation,

Camp opposite Matamoras, Texas.

No. 5.

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, May 25, 1846. GENERAL: I have the pleasure to acknowledge the receipt of the several despatches and orders from your head-quarters since my letter of May 7th, viz: letters dated April 23d, 26th, 30th, and May 3d and 5th, (numbered 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33;) "orders" from 49 to 55; and “special orders” from 54 to 58; all inclusive.

Your correspondence with General Ampudia in relation to the blockade of the mouth of the Rio Grande, reported in a previous communication, and the measures taken to increase the force under your command by calls upon the States of Louisiana and Texas for volunteer troops, are fully approved by the War Department; and it affords me much pleasure to express the perfect confidence that is reposed in you and the army under your command.

Your despatch of May 5, covering the report made by Major Brown, 7th infantry, of the attack upon the field works opposite Matamoras, has satisfied the department that the reliance of the country upon the troops under your command is not misplaced, and that they will be found equal to every emergency.

It is hoped that the battalion of the 1st infantry, from Jefferson barracks, under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Wilson, and the volunteers hastily enrolled at New Orleans, will afford you timely aid. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant, ,

R. JONES, Adjutant General. Brevet Brig. General Z. TAYLOR, Commanding Army of Occupation,

Camp opposite Matamoras, Texas.

No. 6.

ADJUTANT GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, May 30, 1846. GENERAL: I acknowledge your two reports of the 9th of May, received since my letter of the 25th instant; and I have the pleasure to inform you it is with great satisfaction that the President, the Secretary of War, and the general-in-chief, see in the successive conflicts of Palo Alto" and "Resaca de la Palma” the decisive triumph of our arms over a superior force-victories which distinguished the commander and his gallant associates, as well as shed honor upon the whole army of the republic.

Your despatches Nos. 34, 35, 36, 37; also "orders” from 55 to 60, and “special orders” from 58 to 62, all inclusive, have been received. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. JONES, Adjutant General. Brevet Major General Z. TAYLOR, Commanding Army of Occupation,

Camp opposite Matamoras, Texas.

No. 7.

HEAD-QUARTERS OF THE ARMY, Gen. orders Adjutant General's Office, Washington, May 29, 1846.

No. 15. 1. Instructions have already been given to Brigadier General Wool, and through him to several officers placed at his disposition, for the early inspection and muster into the service of the United States of the quotas of twelve-month volunteers who have been called for by the President of the United States from Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Illinois, Tennessee, and Mississippi, and who may present themselves for acceptance, under that call, at the rendezvous of those States respectively.

2. Instructions have also been given to other officers of the army to inspect and muster the quotas, called for in like manner, from Georgia, Alabama, and Arkansas.

3. As soon as inspected and mustered, as above, the several

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