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CINCINNATI, Ohio, August 13, 1816. GENERAL: Since my last report to you, dated 30th ult., I have procured 602 mules, 198 of them were forwarded to Lieutenant Colonel Hunt on the 12th instant. I had 200 for him, but two got a way, and we did not find them until the boat which was to carry them had left. The 404 now on hand will be started on Monday next to Red river by water, and then by land to San Antonio de Bexar, under the general supervision of Captain S. H. Drum. A contract has been made for this purpose for the mules, and 400 horses purchased by Captain Heintzelman. Captain Drum will send a copy of it to you.

We went into all the calculations in regard to expense and risks, and concluded, as most favorable to the government, to contract for their delivery.

The mules I had collected by the 15th, but are kept back, waiting for the horses. Captain Heintzelman is now engaged in paying for horses, a'nd having them driven to Louisville, Ky.

I have sent to New Orleans, in addition to the number stated in my last report, 170 wagons and harness, and will have by the last of this month 50 more, which is all I have contracted for, and shall not engage any more unless instructed to do so by you.

Captain Drum will take nine wagons with him and 50 teamsters. They can break mules on the route, as well as assist in driving. I will supply him with the necessary funds to meet his contract. We have engaged over 200 teamsters. Many of them, when the time arrived to leave, were among the missing. 106 have been started for New Orleans, and the balance of the 150 you ordered sent will leave this evening under the charge of Major Arthur, of your department, on his way to join the army.

The mules purchased will average, delivered here, including all expenses, about $83 per head, and they are a very fine lot of stock, as many persons tell me. We have about cleared Kentucky, down to three years old. A small lot, say 100, could be had in Ohio, as I am informed, on reasonable terms, should they be needed. This is a good place to purchase good and substantial draught horses, and at reasonable rates-say-averaging about $60 per head.

D. D. TOMPKINS, Major and Quartermaster.

CINCINNATI, Ohio, August 26, 1816. SIR: The last of the 400 mules destined for San Antonio de Bexar left this morning. They will receive the 400 horses at Louisville, when the whole will be under the general supervision of Captain S. H. Drum, assistant quartermaster. They will be taken by water to Red river, if the stage of water will permit; if not, to the nearest point on the Mississippi, and then by land. The Ohio is now rising at least 10 feet from here to the mouth. This will enable the largest class of boats to run.

D. D. TOMPKINS, Major and Quartermaster.

Cincinnati, Ohio, September 4, 1816. Sir: Your letter, dated the 24th, was received, but the mules were all on their way, and the horses ready to be received at Louisville, and every thing prepared for their journey. I heard from them this day; they were on the Mississ. ppi, going along very well towards Red river. I instructed Captain Drum, should he, on his arrival at Red river, find his wagons likely to encumber his march, to send them to New Orleans. I think the thing so well arranged that they will soon get through; he will use all despatch in geting them on. The wagons from Buffalo have arrived, and been forwarded, as well as the last fifty I had made here, which closes the wagon and harness business with me.

D. D. TOMPKINS, Major and Quartermaster.

CINCINNATI, Ohio, September 15, 1846. GENERAL: I received, when at Louisville, your letter directing that hereafter any wagons I might have may be sent to St. Louis. All my wagons were shipped to New Orleans some three or four days before receiving the letter. Should any come from Pittsburg, I will have them sent to St. Louis.

D. D. TOMPKINS, Major and Quartermaster.

Charleston, S. C., June 8, 1846. MY DEAR SIR: A desire to serve the department over which you preside, at a crisis like the present, is my motive for troubling you with this letter. What is the character of the river Rio del Norte? To what extent is it navigable, and what depth of water in the dryer season or absence of floods? It seems to me that if supplies to any extent can be pushed up that river, it must present immense facilities to General Taylor's operations. The rivers in Carolina and Georgia are subject, as you know, to very great alternations. In some seasons the Savannah is fordable at Augusta; and, to obviate these difficulties, they have on that river a class of iron boats of easy draught, not exceeding 2} feet water, and which are used as tow boats, accompanied by lighters, which carry from 1,500 to 1,600 bales of cotton, equivalent in weight to from 4,000 to 5,000 barrels of flour, and half that amount nearly of pork and beef. '. I am inclined to the opinion that three boats, with their lighters, might be contracted for at a moderate or fair value, if approached by a private individual, not disclosing that the government needed them. It is true there might be some difficulty in getting the lighters round into the gulf; but, by caution and time, I think it could be effected; and, at all events, in less time than similar lighters could be built on the gulf, and at one-half the cost. If my views are correct as to the probable navigability of the riser to a considerable extent with 23 feet to 3 feet water, these boats and lighters would produce a revolution in Texas. Indeed, they might be found important in all ulterior operations in Mexico, as possibly the streams west of the Rio del Norte, and particularly the one which flows from the valley of Monterey, may be all accessible to light draught of water. At Point Isabel, these boats would accomplish with their lighters all that you could require; and, if I am not misinformed as to the Colorado, they may be made serviceable in that stream to the point where permanent ports are suggested and recommended by General Taylor.

If I can render any service in these particulars, you may command me; but if the government are not disposed to purchase, but would desire to charter the boats, it is probable I could make a favorable arrangement, if the contracts were such as to justify their withdrawal from the Savannah river, and compensate for the hazard, &c., of a removal to the gulf. Among the boats, some of them are of wood, but two or three are iron—all of easy draught, and with lighters--the best constructed for the navigation of shallow rivers I have seen.

JAMES GADSDEN. Major General Thomas S. JESUP,

Washington.

.

[Extract.]

NEW ORLEANS, LA., June 19, 1846. GENERAL: I reported to you yesterday my arrival here. Since then I have had much conversation with Colonel Hunt. He has recently, in fulfilment of General Taylor's requisitions, purchased or chartered seven steamboats which are suited to the Rio Grande. Such aid is much wanted to enable General Taylor to occupy the line of that river above Matamoras. This appears to be his present object. The Alabama, Colonel Hunt says, can be discharged at the end of the second month of her engagement, if we see fit. When I have seen General Taylor, I shall be enabled to judge whether he needs such a heavy craft at this stage of his operations.

HENRY WHITING,

Deputy Quartermaster General. Major General Thomas S. JESUP, Quartermaster General, U. S. A.,

Washington city, D. C.

[Extract.]

Brazos ISLAND, Texas, July 3, 1846. GENERAL: The small boats which have been purchased and chartered for the Grande by Lieutenant Colonel Hunt, are now fast coming. Since the gale, in which we suffered, the weather has been calm, and we hope that most of them will be able to take advantage of it to reach these waters. They are indispensable to General Taylor's proposed operations.

HENRY WHITING,

Deputy Quartermaster General. General Thos. S. JESUP, Quartermaster General, U. S. A.,

Washington city, D. C.

[Extract.]

MATAMORAS, Mexico, July 7, 1846. GENERAL: I reached Matamoras yesterday, via the Rio Grande. It is at this time full and overflowing, and stemmed with difficulty. One small boat, which is not of much power, was nearly two days in getting up. We have now, or shall soon have, seven boats in the river. They will probably enable General Taylor to effect his measures. His orders relative to having some of these boats on this river earlier must have been misunderstood, as they could easily have been fulfilled a month since, much to the advantage of his operations.

General Taylor has required the purchase of two hundred horses for the light artillery; and, as he needs them without delay, I have directed Lieutenant Colonel Hunt to purchase them in New Orleans and Mobile. The price will be great, without doubt, but delay is not warranted.

HENRY WHITING,

Deputy Quartermaster General. General THOMAS S. JESUP, Quartermaster General, U. S. A.,

Washington city, D. C.

MATAMORAS, Mexico, July 9, 1846. GENERAL: General Taylor's main object has now for some time been to throw up supplies on Camargo, with a view to ulterior operations. Thus far our department has not been able to effect this object, but every exertion is making which circumstances admit. The river is high, and has water enough, but is so rapid at its present stage as to be stemmed with difficulty, particularly by the small boats, which are weak in power. Besides, the transportation of

the volunteers overrides every thing. I descend the river to-morrow to urge matters, which have been much embarrassed by the frequent changes as to the mode of transporting supplies that have necessarily taken place. The road between Point Isabel and Fort Brown has now for many days been impassable for loaded teams, and the means adapted to the new route, via the Grande, are but just in operation on and around Brazos island.

HENRY WHITING,

Deputy Quartermaster General. Major General THOMAS S. JESUP, Quartermaster General U.S.A.,

Washington city, D. C.

MATAMORAS, Mexico, July 14, 1816. GENERAL: We have now eight small boats in operation on this river, and will soon have two or four more. These will enable me, in a short time, to fulfil General Taylor's orders to have 300,000 rations at Camargo preparatory to a march on Monterey. The obstructions thus far, in the way of fulfilling this order, have been many and great. He is impatient, and says the department has been much behindhand. It may have been so, but I dare say much satisfactory explanation could be given. We are here far from all means, and some eight or ten thousand volunteers have been poured in without bringing with them any additional means of movement.

HENRY WHITING,

Deputy Quartermaster General. Major General Thomas S. JESUP, Quartermaster General U. S. A.,

Washington city, D. C.

MATAMORAS, Mexico, July 17, 1846. GENERAL: It is proper to apprize you of the manner in which the steam craft have accumulated on this river, that you may be able to answer any questions that may be put relating to that subject. It will no doubt be the subject of comment. When I reached New Orleans, Colonel Hunt informed me that he believed General Taylor was dissatisfied with the mode in which he had provided transportation for the army, and had authorized two persons, one of them Captain Sanders, of the engineers, and a Mr. Winthrop, of New Orleans, to send on steam craft suited to the Grande, which would be employed on reaching that river. Captain Sanders consulted with Colonel Hunt, who at once set to work to fulfil General Taylor's wishes. The result of his exertions has been, that five small steamers have been added to the number already in the river, viz: the Cincinnati, the Nera, and the Aid. Mr. Winthrop sent on two oiher steamers, which have also been employed; and Colonel Hint jalorins ine (the letter received this day) that he has five

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