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orders” No. 13, and special orders" No. 45, both of May 26, being received on that day. Our dates from the north are some days later through the newspapers. No steamboats have been sent out from New Orleans for the navigation of the Rio Grande; and, in the absence of all information on that point, or respecting the views of the government, I am altogether in the dark as to our future operations. I must think that orders have been given, by superior authority, to suspend the forwarding of means of transportation from New Orleans. I cannot otherwise account for the extraordinary delay shown by the quartermaster's department in that city. Even the mails, containing, probably, important despatches from the goveșnment, are not expedited.

Z. TAYLOR,

Brevet Brig. Gen., commanding. The Adjutant General of the Army,

Washington, D. C.

NEW ORLEANS, July 4, 1846. GENERAL: I had the honor to report to you, on the 11th ultimo, that I had purchased the steamboats Undine, ($13,000,) and Troy, ($6,000,) and I now have the honor to say, that since that time, I have purchased steamboats, as follows:

The J. E. Roberts, for $9,000, on the 13th of June; paid for the 26th.

The Brownsville, for $9,000, on the 15th of June; paid for the 20th.

The steam-schooner (propeller) James Cage, for $18,000, on the 19th of June; paid for June 29.

The Hatchee Eagle, on the 1st instant:-paid for 2d—for $5,000.

All, except the last named, have been despatched, viz: the Tros on the 14th ultimo; (she was at Galveston about the 22d, detained on account of bad weather;) J. E. Roberts on the 25th ultimo; the Brownsville on the 25th ultimo; the James Cage on the 1st instant; and the Undine on the 2d instant. The Undine and James Cage I had coppered, and I had a good deal of other work-reducing cabin, making alterations and additions, and other work-10 ft them for the run by sea, &c.

The Troy, J. E. Roberts, and Brownsville are light draught, and calculated, mostly, for the Rio Grande; and so is the Hatchee Eagle, now in dock to be caulked, and undergoing other repairs,

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The James Cage is a good sea boat, and will serve very well as a lighter for vessels at sea, and other sea serviee.

The Undine is light draught. I have despatched her to Por! La Vaca, temporarily for service, should Captain Irwin not be able to get along without her. I adopted this course because I bave understood that some 200,000 rations were to be sent from the north to that place; and, not knowing the draught of the vessels that may have taken them, I was apprehensive that they could not enter Matagorda bay, and consequently would have to be lightered at sea; which, by the way, would be very troublesome and laborious, and would be attended with much risk. The distance from the entrance to Matagorda bay (Pass Caballo) to Port La Vaca, is 25 or 30 miles. I expect, when I am better informed, as I presume I shall be when I hear from Captain Irwin, to have the Undine relieved by another boat-the Hatchee Eagle, perhaps.

Besides the above named, I have chartered steamboats, as follows, viz:

The Big Hatchee, which departed from Brazos Santiago on the 10th of June. She was at Galveston about the 22d, detained by bad weather. The charter is conditioned that she will answer our purposes; and the test is to be, that she will take 100 tons of freight up the river to Matamoras, provided there be 33 feet water in the river. The compensation is to be $135} per day, and we to find her fuel. No per diem is allowed for going down; but if she enter our service, and serve, she is to be paid $1,000 as reimbursement of of expenses, &c., in going down.

The Warren, which departed on the 27th ultimo. Her service commences when she is reported in good order and condition to the quartermaster at Brazos Santiago. She is to get $125 per day, we to find her fuel-chartered for three months. We are to pay $1,000 as reimbursement of expenses in getting her down; no per diem for which is yet allowed.

The Exchange departed yesterday. Same terms, &c., as the Warren, except that her charter is for four months.

The W. N. Mercer, to leave to-morrow if the weather permit. Agreement the same as for the Warren.

I have received advices from Captain Sanders of his having purchased two boats, to be delivered to me here: the Rough and Ready, for $12,000, and the Whiteville, for $5,500. I hope he will make no more engagements, because I think we now have enough. I shall, however, have information from Colonel Whiting by the next arrival from Brazos Santiago, and may be better informed.

We had a very severe gale of wind from yesterday afternoon until this morning, and I fear we shall have information of disasters to our steamers and other vessels.

THOS. F. HUNT,

Deputy Quartermaster General. Major General Thomas S. JESUP,

Quartermaster General, Washington city. .

[Extract.)

New ORLEANS, July 22, 1846. GENERAL: Threc of the steamboats purchased by Captain Sander3 have arrived, and been received. One has been paid for, and the other two not. The late owners. or their agents are waiting impatiently for their money.

THOS. F. HUNT,

Deputy Quartermaster General. Major General Thos. S. Jesup,

Quartermaster General, Washington city.

[Extract.)

sparede department, res but I understhio, &c. Genet horse wago

New ORLEANS, July 26, 1846. GENERAL: No exertions have been spared by me to meet all the wants of the service, so far as depends on me, and none shall be spared. I do not apprehend any embarrassment in the quartermaster's department, if we only have the money. Very few wagons can be purchased here; but I understand a large number (some 200 or 300) may be expected from the Ohio, &c. General Wool so informed me. I have received 57 ox wagons and 24 horse wagons.

THOS. F. HUNT,

Deputy Quartermaster General. Major General Thos. S. JESUP,

Quartermuster General, Washington city.

can be purepartment, it wend any embaran me, and no

[Extract.)

New Orleans, August 23, 1846. GENERAL: In regard to horses and mules, I have to remark that I have shipped of the former for Brazos island upwards of 200, and of the latter very few; and for La Vaca about 100 horses, and something more than 800 mules. In a few days I shall ship horses received from up the river, and also some that I have purchased for Brazos island; and also mules and horses for La Vaca-perhaps in the course of the week from five hundred to a thousand.

THOS. F. HUNT,

Deputy Quartermaster General. Major General Thos. S. JESUP, .

Quartermaster General, 'Washington city.

[Extract.]

New ORLEANS, September 6, 1846. GENERAL: As soon as I possibly can have them prépared, all the reports required by the regulations, now due from me, shall be made out and transmitted; and I would remark that I have discharged with fidelity and unceasing perseverance, and I trust with credit to

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the department, immense and almost overpowering duties for at least four months past. No single officer of the army would or could have done what I have; and I fear no scrutiny, however searching or minute, into my conduct. I shall most assuredly demand and court an investigation.

THOS. F. HUNT,

Deputy Quartermaster General. Major General Thos. S. JESUP,

Quartermaster General, Washington city.

[Extract.]

Colonel Mackay had one in regard to, that I re

olo I wrote: Youes made hoes, at 1. How yould ma

New ORLEANS, October 8, 1846. . GENERAL: Not having wagons here for any portion of a train, and very few being to be purchased, and having understood from Colonel March, arrived on the 6th from St. Louis, that Lieutenant Colonel Mackay had received a good many which he had no use for, I wrote to the colonel in regard to them. (Herewith is a copy of my letter.) You will perceive, too, that I requested him to have horse and mule shoes made and sent to me. I am now having made at this place 15,000 mule-shoes, at 18 cents per pound, and 10,000 horse-shoes, at 16, cents per pound. How soon they will be done I cannot say. The undertakers said they would make from 300 to 500 per day. I have shipped a good many to both armies since the date of yours in regard to the want of them. As soon as requisitions were made on me for them, I did all I could to have them made; but the progress was slow compared with the wants of the service.

THOS. F. HUNT,

Deputy Quartermaster General. Major General Thos. S. JESUP,

Quartermaster General, Washington city.

des, at :900 mulee, and sent, that i (Herewi

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New ORLEANS, October 10, 1846. GENERAL: Owing to the greater facility of getting transportation here for Brazos añd La Vaca, as also for getting forage, and considering the small charge for bringing the animals here, I have concluded to have all the mules, wagons, &c., now at Blakely, transported to this place, where, besides the other advantages, I can have them ready, at a very short notice, for embarkation. The transportation is for each animal $4, and for each wagon $5.

THOS. F. HUNT,

Deputy Quartermaster General. Major General Thos. S. Jesup,

Quartermaster General, Washington city.

New ORLEANS, October 11, 1846. GENERAL : The uncertainty of getting transportation at Mobile, and the higher rates that would have to be paid for it for the mules from Blakeley to Brazos Santiago, in the event of their being sent to that place, and the probable greater cost of forage, have induced me to decide to have the whole brought to this place, which I have nade arrangements for, having given Captain Toulmin, assistant quartermaster, the necessary instructions yesterday. (See herewith a copy of my letter.) In shipping animals I have availed of the transports to send other stores at the same time, which could not be done at Mobile. Here every thing will be under my own immediate direction, and a movement can be made with greater facility.

THOS. F. HUNT,

Deputy Assistant Quartermaster. To Major General Thomas S. Jesup,

Quartermaster General, Washington city.

at Mohind other storespping animalesterday. (See assi

The Unection theorted by this reported

New Orleans, October 26, 1846. COLONEL : In my report of July 4, in regard to steamboats, I noted the chartering of the W. N. Mercer for three months; she left 'this place for Brazos Santiago on the 6th of that month.

The steamer Samuel M. Williams I chartered for service at La Vaca, &c., as a lighter, on the 11th July; she was then at Galveston or neighborhood, and proceeded thence to La Vaca.

These two boats, as well as others which I chartered for a time and sent to the Rio Grande, as reported July 4, have, I presume, been regularly reported by the officers of the department under whose direction they have been serving.

The United States steamer Hatchee Eagle, reported on the 4th of July, as purchased on the 1st for $5,000, was despatched hence for Brazos Santiago, July 20, after having undergone repairs, alterations, &c.

I purchased, July 15, for $12,000, the steamer Mentoria, a steam wheel boat without guard, light draught, and well calculated as a lighter on the bars. I had her much strengthened, coppered, and despatched her for the Brazos Santiago on the 11th of August.

I purchased, July 13, the steamship Telegraph, which had just performed service under a charter of $7,000, and in the completing of which demurrage accrued at Mobile, in consequence of delay, &c., with volunteers, to the amount of $7,508 33, making $14,508 33, which amount was deducted from the sum of $25,000 that I paid on the 27th of July, the actual cost of the ship being $10,491 67. This vessel has not been transferred to any other point; she belongs to this station. She has performed three trips since she was purchased, two to La Vaca and one to Brazos Santiago, which services were

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