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Fort POLK, May 18, 1846. Sir: Yesterday I sent the steamer Neva into the Rio Grande, by order of General Taylor, commanding. She had been leaking badly previous to her getting into the river, caused by the worms, which have got into her during her long service in the salt water entirely, and it is doubtful whether she can be preserved for service. Ex. perienced captains of vessels inform me that when a vessel, in which the worms have got much, is placed in fresh water, they be. come more active, and endeavor to eat their way through the planking. If they succeed in doing this before they are killed by the fresh water, the vessel is frequently lost. A few days will determine the question.

General Taylor has directed me to procure a suitable boat for the Rio Grande, and I have written to Lieutenant Colonel Hunt to purchase and send one out, of the following dimensions, &c., viz: a good substantial river boat, from 125 to 135 feet in length, with two engines, so as to be able to turn with ease, as the river is both narrow and crooked, with short turns; to draw not over 4į feet with a full load; to be coppered, inasmuch as we may have to use her in salt water. It is bad economy to send an uncoppered boat into these waters, as one season will destroy a perfectly new boat.

If the Neva is preserved, I think that the boat sent for will be sufficient for all our purposes; but if she should prove to be too much worm-eaten, I shall be compelled to send to Lieutenant Colonel Hunt for another boat similar to the one which I have required of him.

CHAS. THOMAS,

Major, and Quartermaster. Major General Thos. S. JESUP,

Quartermaster General, Washington city.

Fort POLK, May 18, 1846. Sir: Finding it impossible to repair the United States steamer "Colonel Long” so as to render her serviceable, or even safe to send her to New Orleans, I have had her engine carefully taken out and packed, ready to send to New Orleans, where it can be sold, or a new boat built for it. I would recommend that the latter be done, as it is a fine engine, and in a good state of preservation, and will last many years.

I have had every thing preserved, and nothing will be required but the hull, which might be built and coppered, with every thing complete, for about $6,000. The boat should not exceed 130 feet in length, with sufficient breadth of beam to carry 1,000 barrels on 4 feet draught of water.

CHAS. THOMAS,

Major and Quartermaster. Major General Thos. S. JESUP,

Quartermaster General, Washington city.

[Extract.]

FORT POLK, May 18, 1846. Sir: So many troops have been ordered to reinforce the army now here, that I apprehend we shall not have sufficient land transportation, if, as I understand is the case, the general takes the field on the south side of the Rio Grande. I have therefore required of Lieutenant Colonel Hunt fifty mule wagons and twenty ox wagons, with harness, yokes, &c., complete.

The number of volunteers which have been ordered here has exhausted the requisition of General Taylor.

CHAS. THOMAS,

Major and Quartermaster. Major General Thos. S. JESUP,

Quartermaster General, Washington city.

Brazos SANTIAGO, June 24, 1846. Sir: I have to report the total loss of the United States steamer Colonel Harney, which was wrecked during the night of the 22d instant, while coming in over the bar at this place.

About noon of the 22d she was ordered out by Captain J. M. Hill, assistant quartermaster, to bring in volunteers from the barque Chapin, lying off the harbor. After taking on board a number, the captain of her (Wood) started to come in. On coming over the outer bar her captain reports that she struck, and that he was unable to get her into the right channel again before dark. During the night she drifted into the breakers, and by morning she was hard aground and bilged.

Towards evening on the 22d it was perceived, from the landing at this place, that she was rubbing hard, but no apprehension of injury even was entertained, as far as I can learn, by the many captains of vessels in the harbor, especially as no signal was noticed indicating that she wanted assistance.

During the night Captain Wood sent in a small boat; but instead of reporting to Čaptain Hill or myself, both of whom were on the island, that he was in a dangerous situation and needed assistance, he entirely neglected it, and sent to the United States schooner Hunt merely for a larger yawl and an anchor.

I was not aware that the Harney was in any danger until after 6 o'clock the morning of the 23d, at which time I received a message from Captain Wood. I immediately sent for the steamer Monmouth to go to his assistance; but before she could get to the bar (she being at the time at Point Isabel) it was too late to render any assistance in getting afloat. The crew and troops were all saved, but the bar has been so rough since the accident that I apprehend little else will be saved, except what may drift ashore.

CHAS. THOMAS,

Major and Quartermaster. Major General Thos. S. JESUP,

Quartermaster General, Washington city.

[Extract.]

SAN ANTONIO DE BEXAR, October 11, 1846. , Sir: I have the honor to report that Captain Drum, assistant quartermaster, arrived here a few days ago in charge of a large drove of horses and mules, which he brought by land from a point on the Mississippi near Natchez. The mules arrived in good condition, and may be considered as a very good lot, with but few exceptions. The horses, taken as a whole, are rather an inferior lot of animals, many of them entirely broken down and unfit for service. On their arrival I applied for an inspection of them, and Colonel Churchill condemned fifty horses and eight mules. These I havė directed to be sold at public auction.

CHS. THOMAS,

Major and Quartermaster. To Major General Th. S. Jesup,

Quartermaster General, Washington city.

[Extract.]

CAMP NEAR MONCLOVA, Mexico,

November 4, 1846. Sir: Since writing you on the 2d instant I received your instructions to Captain Drum relative to the disposition of the horses and mules which he brought out and delivered at San Antonio on the 8th ultimo, supposing they were intended for the use of General Wool's division of the army. Captain Drum having no orders except to deliver them at that point, I at once appropriated them to that service. I reported this on the 11th ultimo, stating the condition of the animals. Since the receipt of your instructions as to their proper destination, I submitted them to General Wool, who says that he approves of the disposition I made of them, and at present their destination cannot be changed. I think it well that the horses particularly were stopped at San Antonio, as I think if they had been continued on to Camargo they would have been entirely broken down.

CHS. THOMAS,

Major and Quartermaster. To Major General Thos. S. JESUP,

Quartermaster General, Washington city.

1846.

Savannah, Ga., Friday, June 26, GENERAL: I have the honor to report my arrival at this place last evening, accompanied by Mr. Lamar and Mr. Griffin. By, apo pointment I' met Mr. Lamar this morning at 11, who informed me that, contrary to his expectations, the De Rossett was not in town,

but that he had sent for her, and that he would have her ready for inspection to-morrow morning (Saturday) at 10.

I called on Mr. Goodwin also. He showed me the Chatham. She is now undergoing some alterations, (lowering her boilers,) which I consider for our service and advantage. He will have her ready for inspection on Monday. The Mary Summers is not in town, but will be down to-morrow. The John Randolph does not belong to the steamboat company. She appears to be not so large as the Chatham, I should judge from just a passing view as she lay in the river. I shall make more minute inquiries regarding her

to-morrow.

In passing through Charleston I called upon Colonel Gadsden, who very kindly offered any advice or assistance which he could give me

If the De Rossett, on examination, should prove such as she is represented to be, I should like, with your approbation, to raise her furnace bars, for the purpose of trying her with coal. The alteration will not require more than two days, and at a trifling expense. I make the request because, if I understood you aright, she was to be altered to burn coal on her arrival at New Orleans, in which case it would be, in my opinion, more desirable to make the alteration here, which can be readily done, and send her round with coal, than with wood. It would be more safe, and render unnecessary any stoppage on the route.

If necessary I shall communicate with you daily, informing you of my progress and asking for instructions.

HENRY C. WAYNE,

Captain and Assistant Quartermaster. Major General Thos. S. JESUP,

Washington.

[Extract.]

SAVANNAH, GA., June 30, 1846. GENERAL : From all the information I have been able to get, and from my own observation, I find all of the iron steamboats on the river, which the exception of the Randolph and the Lamar, to be, in their present condition, totally unfit for efficient service. The Randolph and the Lamar are, I think, out of the question, the directors of the Iron Steamboat Company, to which they belong, declining to sell them; or should they agree to sell, a price would be asked which the government ought not to pay, as it would not be the absolute value of the boats, but their value to the company, very much enhanced by the withdrawal of the De Rossett from the trade and the breaking up of the Georgia Steamboat Company.

HENRY C. WAYNE,

Captain and Assistant Quartermaster. Major General Thos. S. JESUP,

Washington.

SAVANNAH, Ga., July 15, 1846. GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge your letter of the 5th instant, which reached me on the 10th. I immediately commenced a negotiation with Mr. Goodwin, president of the Georgia Steamboat Company, for the steamer Mary Summers. His indisposition delayed a final agreement until yesterday, when he notified me of the acceptance of the company of my offer of twenty thousand dollars, with the condition that he shall have her hauled up, and that her hull, on examination, shall be 'found sound and serviceable.

The other boat referred to in my letter of the 30th ultimo was the Chatham; but her trial satisfied me that her boiler could not be altered to burn coal, and that it would be only with the best quality of light wood that steam could be made on her advantageously. This, together, with my instructions in regard to the De. Rossett, determined me not to offer for her.

I bave already entered upon my arrangements for overhauling and repairing the Mary Summers, and hope to have them fully determined by to-morrow noon, and commenced immediately thereafter. They will be carried on under the care of Captain F. Peck, well known to yourself and the department, and to whom I shall give the command of her when ready for sea.

HENRY C. WAYNE,

Captain and Assistant Quartermaster. Major General Thos. S. Jesup, Washington.

[Extract.]

Savannah, Ga., July 27, 1846. General: I have the honor to acknowledge your letter of the 21st instant; and, in accordance with its instructions, have ordered the additional eighteen wagons mentioned in my letter of the 24th. The whole thirty-six, together with complete sets of harness, will be ready for shipment by the De Rossett and Mary Summers.

HENRY C. WAYNE,

Coptain and Assistant Quartermaster. Major General Thos. S. JEsup, Washington.

COLUMBUS, Ga., August 13, 1846. GENERAL: I have the honor to report my return to this place last night, and to acknowledge the recept of your letters of the 3d and 6th instant. I had previously made my arrangements to puta chase, and sent out five men from Macon' to drive through the country towards Columbus, and issued handbills appointing certain

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