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cult matter to send them by small vessels, as the hatchways are seldom sufficiently large for the wagons to pass into the hold.

I think we shall have a sufficient number of wagons here to complete the cargoes of the “Edith” and “Neptune.

M. M. CLARK, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

ASSISTANT QUARTERMASTER'S OFFICE,

New York, August 21, 1846. Sir: Captain Thistle has just been at this office. He informs me that he has 100 wagons in this city and 300 in Boston. 4

We shall have here from 130 to 150 wagons more than can be taken by the “Neptune” and “Edith.” I will endeavor to send them by fast sailing vessels.

Major Eastland informs me that he has written to you in regard to. a steam propeller. Should you give him instructions as to such a vessel, to take freight from this place, it would perhaps be well to communicate by telegraph, so that it may be known in time to prevent the taking up of other vessels for the wagons.

Funds should be furnished to me here to pay for the 100 wagons to be received on Captain Thistle's contracts; that is, if I am to pay for them. The 300 in Boston, at $170 each.

$51,000 The 300 sets harness, at $42..

12,600

$63,600 Required to pay for Captain Thistle's purchases in that city.

M. M. CLARK, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

Boston, Mass., August 28, 1846. Sir: After having made every possible inquiry, I find that it is not possible to get light draught vessels to take the wagons from this place to Brazos San Iago; consequently, one or more large vessels will necessarily have to be taken. Light draught ones might be had from Providence, but they, in all probability, could, not reach here for eight or ten days, if so soon.

Captain Thistle informs me that there will be over 300 wagons, and probably not so much harness as was expected. After taking up some one or more of the vessels which have been offered tomorrow morning, I may probably return to New York for a few days, until about the time the vessels will be loaded, and then return to this place to make payments and take bills' of lading. I shall probably ascertain during to-morrow whether I can leave

here or not.

M. M. CLARK, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

Assistant QUARTERMASTER'S OFFICE,

New York, September 1, 1816. Sir: I returned from Boston this morning, having with much difficulty made arrangements for transporting the wagons from that place to Brazos San lago, and saw them going on board the vessels.

I shall return to Boston to-morrow to make payments for the wagons and harness.

M. M. CLARK, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

New York, September 9, 1846. Sir: I returned from Boston yesterday morning, having paid for and shipped from that place all the wagons (307) purchased by Captain Thistle. There was no harness ready, in consequence of the contractor having been disappointed in getting saddles. I was informed by Captain Thistle that 200 sets would be ready in the course of two or three days, and would be forwarded to this place at the cost of the contractor.

M. M. CLARK, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

New York, September 21, 1846. SIR: I have received from Captain Thistle a copy of your letter to him of the 7th instant, relating to the harness made by McBurney. A sufficient quantity of harness for all the wagons sent to Texas cannot be had here; and if it is necessary that a set should be sent for each wagon, I would respectfully advise that the 200 sets made by McBurney be received. The material of which it has been made is excellent, and it has been put together in a good workmanlike manner. There are 100 sets of harness made in this city, contracted for by Captain Thistle, which, together with McBurney's, will be sufficient for his (Captain Thistle's) wagons. Shall it be received?

Of the wagons for which I contracted, 550 have been shipped, togetter with the necessary harness; and I have contracted for a sufficient quantity of the latter article for all the wagons yet to be furnished.

In saying that a sufficient quantity of harness cannot be had for all the wagons sent to Texas, I mean for those purchased by Captain Thistle.

M. M. CLARK, Captain and Assistant Quartermaster.

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Memorandum of wagons shipped to Texas by Captain M. M. Clark.

From New York......
From New York...
From Boston...

550 with harness.
100 purchased by Captain Thistle.
307
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Total.....

957

[BY TELEGRAPH.]

BALTIMORE, July 22, 1816. GENERAL: I shall start for York this afternoon, in compliance with your order. I have engaged in this place, from Bartus Wilkins, 25 sets, and from Jenkins & Little 25 sets of harness, complete, including saddles, for 4 horses, to be ready in ten days. I have made arrangements tò look into this market for all the wagons that can be bought, or built here in a short time.

S. B. DUSENBERY,

Assistant Quartermaster. To General Th. S. JESUP,

Washington city.

1

[Extract.)

BALTIMORE, July 24, 1846. GENERAL: I returned from York and Shrewsbury, Pennsylvania, to-day, and have the honor to enclose you a copy of an agreement which I entered into in York for wagons. The wagon business in that part of the country is greatly diminished since the railroad has been in operation. I saw not a single wagon with a suitable body; but there are numbers running which will answer if bodies are put to them, and for which I prefer to have running gear made, in hot haste, in the shops. All that are in reach of York, and also all the suitable running gear finished in the shops in and around York, will be immediately procured and finished off by Mr. Hess. At Shrewsbury I engaged Messrs. Myers and Small to procure all the wagons in and around that place, to be finished off in like manner, and on the same terms., They would not engage to furnish any particular number of wagons by a given time; but the prices are sufficient to stimulate them to extraordinary exertions, and I think I may confidently calculate upon getting filty wagons from the two places in a month or six weeks. I shall endeavor to take a day in each week to run up to see the progress they are making, and to have the wagons brought down as they are finished, and as opportunities may offer for shipping them. The covers to the wagons I propose to have made here. I can procure harness here to almost any extent; but if more is wanted than will be required for the

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wagons that I may be able to purchase, I beg that you will inform me, and to what extent it will be safe for me engage it.

S. B. DUSENBERY,

Assistant Quartermaster. To General TH. S. JESUP,

Washington city.

BALTIMORE, July 29, 1846, 4 o'clock, p. m. GENERAL: I have the honor to enclose you herewith a detailed description of the furniture wagon which I am having fitted up for service in Mexico, in compliance with your instructions. There are some of a lighter description that I am having fitted up for two horses. In all, I have received up to this hour about twenty-eight of this description of wagons, which I expect to ship on Monday next for Point Isabel, on the deck of a provender vessel, which am now loading. I have also eight or ten country market wagons to ship at the same time, if the vessel is able to take them. Wagons of both these classes are now rapidly coming in to me. I have made engagements in this place for wagons of other description, up to the present time, for delivery as they are furnished-up to the 1st of September next for about 150 wagons. I have made arrangements for harness for the whole, and for covers, and shall continue to do so for all that I may purchase or engage.

S. B. DUSENBERY,

Assistant Quartermaster. To. General Th. S. JESUP,

Washington city.

P. S.-I propose going to York, Pennsylvania, on Friday morning next, to look after the wagons which I have engaged in that place and Shrewsbury. I shall return on Saturday morning.

S. B. D.

(BY TELEGRAPH.]

BALTIMORE, August 1, 1846. GENERAL: I have up to this time purchased and engaged about 260 wagons, of all descriptions. I fear I may overrun the mark, and wish that you will indicate to me by telegraph about how many it will be advisable for me to secure by the 1st of September next, that being the latest date I have agreed for.

S. B. DUSENBERY,

Assistant Quartermaster. To General Th. S. JESUP,

Washington city.

[Extract.]

[BY TELEGRAPH.]

BALTIMORE, August 3, 1846. GENERAL: I expect to get about 27 wagons on board of a vessel to-morrow, and before the end of a week 25 more on board of another provision vessel; and I think I shall have enough wagons by 1st of next week for a deck load for another vessel. They will be well secured on deck, and will cost about $10 each. I shall be able in a few days to inform you what number of wagons I may expect ready for delivery in this place, and at York and Shrewsbury, Pennsylvania, by the 10th, 15th, and 20th instant.

S. B. DUSENBERY,

Assistant Quartermaster. To General Th. S. Jesup,

Washington city.

[BY TELEGRAPH.]

BALTIMORE, August 6, 1846. GENERAL: As far as I have been able to ascertain, I think I can Collect here by the 11th instant 25 new wagons, the bodies of which cannot be taken apart.

About the 20th instant I think 75 more can be got here. Shall I forward these, as they arrive, to Philadelphia, up to (including) the 11th instant; or is it your intention to order a steamer to touch here for all that I can collect up to the 20th instant; or must I ship the whole by sail vessels, as fast as I can? I beg you to answer by telegraph, as I must make arrangements at once with the railroad to get wagons here and forward them by the 12th.

S. B. DUSENBERY,

Assistant Quartermaster. To General Th. S. JESUP,

Washington city.

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Baltimore, August 12, 1846. GENERAL: I have the honor to report that last week I shipped 29 wagons on board two provision vessels. I returned from York, Pennsylvania, this morning, where and at Shrewsbury I received yesterday 22 wagons, which are now on the way to this place, and which I shall immediately ship on two small vessels that are now nearly loaded with oats. I shall have some 25 or 30 wagons more, the bodies of which cannot be taken apart, which I shali also ship on board of oat vessels, if possible, this week. On the morning of the 18th instant I am promised in York about 25 wagons, the bodies of which can be taken apart, and which I can send direct to Philadelphia at $6 25 each, by the 20th instant, if that will not be too late; and by the 20th instant I expect to be able to send about 50 wagons or more to Philadelphia from this place, the bodies of which

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