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would present, to be entered on the Journal, a protest against the action of the Senate on the above resolution.

INAUGURATION OF THE GOVERNOR ELECT.

At 1 P. M. the Senate proceeded to the Hall of the House of Representatives, to attend the inauguration of Hon. D. H. Chamberlain, Governor elect.

The two houses, having met in Joint Assembly, it was called to order by Hon. S. A. SWAILS, President pro tem. of the Senate.

The PRESIDENT pro tem. announced that, pursuant to concurrent resolution, the Joint Assembly had met for the purpose of inaugurating Hon. D. H. Chamberlain, Governor elect, and requested the Special Joint Committee to inform that gentleman that the Joint Assembly was prepared to receive him.

The Governor elect, accompanied by the Special Committee appointed to wait upon His Excellency, was conducted to the Speaker's stand.

Hon. R. H. GLEAVES, President of the Senate, then introduced to the Joint Assembly His Excellency Hon. D. H. Chamberlain.

The oath of office was administered by B. I. Boone, Esq., Probate Judge of Richland County, to the Governor elect.

His Excellency D. H. Chamberlain, Governor, then delivered the following

INAUGURAL ADDRESS.

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives :

I accept the office to which, by the voice of a majority of the people of this State, I have a second time been called, with a full knowledge of the grave responsibilities and difficulties by which it is now attended. No consideration, except the clearest convictions of duty, would be sufficient to induce me to accept this great trust under the circumstances which now surround us. I regard the present hour in South Carolina as a crisis at which no patriotic citizen should shrink from any post to which public duty may call him. In my sober judgment, our present struggle is in defense of the foundations of our government and institutions. If we fail now, our government-the government of South Carolina–will no longer rest on the consent of the governed, expressed by a free vote of a majority of our people. If our opponents triumph-I care not under what guise of legal forms—we shall witness the overthrow of free government in our State.

My chief personal anxiety, is that I may have the firmness and wisdom to act in a manner worthy of the great interests so largely committed to my keeping. My chief public care shall be to contribute my

utmost efforts to defend the rights, to guard the peace and to promote the welfare of all the people of our State.

The constant occupation of my time with other duties which I could not postpone, has prevented me from preparing the usual statements and recommendations respecting our public affairs. At the earliest practicable day, I will discharge this duty. Our greatest interest, our most commanding duty now, is to stand firmly, each in his appointed place, against the aggressions and allurements of our political opponents. Our position up to the present time, has been within the clear limits of our constitution and laws. Nothing but the cowardice or weakness or treachery of our own friends, can rob us of the victory. I state what facts show, what overwhelming evidence proves, when I say that if we yield now, we shall witness the consummation of a deliberate and cruel conspiracy on the part of the Democratic party of this State to overcome by brute force the political will of a majority of thirty thousand of the lawful voters of this State.

I have mourned over public abuses which have beretofore arisen here. I have, according to the measure of my ability, labored to make the conduct of our public affairs honest and honorable. But I stand appalled at the crimes against freedom, against public order, against good government, nay, against government itself, which our recent political experience here has presented. And I am the more appalled when I see the North, that portion of our country which is secure in its freedom and civil order, and the great political party which bas controlled the Republic for sixteen years, divided in its sympathies and judgment upon such questions. It is written in blood on the pages of our recent national history, that no government can rest with safety upon the enforced slavery or degradation of a race. In the full blaze of that great example of retributive justice which swept away half a million of the best lives of our country, we see the American people divided by party lines upon the question of the disfranchisement and degradation of the same race whose physical freedom was purchased at such a cost. And, what is more astonishing still, there are Republicans who permit the errors which have attended the first efforts of this race in self-government to chill their sympathies to such an extent that they stand coldly by and practically say that the peace of political servitude is better than the abuses and disquiet which newly acquired freedom has brought.

I denounce the conduct of the recent election, on the part of our political opponents in this State, as a vast, brutal outrage. Fraud, proscription, intimidation in all forms, violence, ranging through all its degrees, up to wanton murder, were its effective methods. The circumstances under which we have assembled to-day show us how nearly successful has been this great conspiracy. It is for us, in the face of all

danger, in the face of false or timid friends, in the face of open enemies, to show that we understand the cause in which we are engaged, and that no earthly sacrifice is too great to secure its triumph.

The gentleman who was my opponent for this office in the late election has recently declared, as I am credibly informed, that he held not only the peace of this city and State, but my life, in his hand. I do not doubt the truth of his statement. Neither the public peace nor the life of any man who now opposes the consummation of this policy of fraud and violence is safe from the assaults of those who have enforced that policy.

My life can easily be taken. I have held it, in the judgment of all my friends here, by a frail tenure for the last three months. But there is one thing no man in South Carolina can do, however powerful or desperate he may be, and that is to cause me to abate my hatred or cease 'my most vigorous resistance to this attempted overthrow and enslavement of a majority of the people of South Carolina. “Here I stand; I can do no otherwise: God be my helper.” Wife and children, nearer to me than “are the ruddy drops that visit my sad heart”—all other considerations must give way before the solemn duty to resist the final success of that monstrous outrage under whose black shadow we are assembled to-day.

At 1:30 P. M., the Senate returned to the Senate Chamber.

Hon. R. H. GLEAVES, Lieutenant Governor elect, was conducted to the President's stand by the Special Committee appointed to wait upon the Governor and Lieutenant Governor elect.

Hon. S. A. SWAILS, President pro tem., introduced to the Senate Hon. R. H. Gleaves, Lieutenant Governor elect.

The oath of office was administered by B. I. Boone, Esq., Judge of Probate of Richland County, to the Lieutenant Governor elect.

Hon. R. H. GLEAVES addressed the Senate and said :

Senators :

I shall not detain the Senate with any extended remarks. Too much valuable time has already been lost, for the transaction of important public business. I endorse, in every particular, the sentiments expressed by his Excellency, Governor D. H. Chamberlain, in his inaugural address, delivered in the Hall of the House of Representatives this day. As the presiding officer of this body I shall endeavor at all times to act impartially, and to extend the same cotirtesy to every Senator on this floor. All that I ask is a return of kindness to myself in the same spirit.

The Senate is now ready to proceed to business.

NOTICES OF BILLS.

Mr. COCHRAN gave notice that he will on to-morrow, or some subsequent day, ask leave to introduce

Bill to reduce and regulate the pay of officers, attachees, clerks and laborers of the General Assembly, and to provide the manner of electing, appointing aud paying the same.

BILLS INTRODUCED.

Mr. WHITTEMORE, pursuant to notice, introduced

Bill to repeal an Act entitled "An Act to secure advances for agricultural purposes."

The Bill received its first reading, was ordered for a second reading and consideration to-morrow, and to be printed.

PAPERS FROM THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

The House sent to the Senate,

Bill relative to the inauguation of the Governor and Lieutenant Governor of the State of South Carolina.

The Bill received its first reading, was ordered for a second reading and consideration to-morrow, and to be printed.

On motion of Mr. MYERS, at 1:35 P. M., the Senate adjourned.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1876.

The Senate assembled at 12 M., and was called to order by the PRESIDENT.

The roll was called, and, a quorum answering to their names, the PRESIDENT announced the Senate ready to proceed to business.

On motion of Mr. TAFT, the members of the Committee appointed by the United States House of Representatives to visit and investigate affairs in South Carolina, were invited to seats on the floor of the Senate.

On motion of Mr. CORWIN, the reading of the Journal of yesterday was dispensed with.

The Senator from Barnwell asked and obtained leave of absence until Tuesday next, on account of sickness in bis family.

Mr. TAFT announced that in all votes in the Senate on any matter until Tuesday next he had agreed to pair with the Senator from Barnwell.

Mr. CORWIN moved that the oath of office be administered to Hon. M. W. Gary, and that he be admitted to a seat in the Senate as Sepator elect from Edgefield County.

The PRESIDENT ruled the motion out of order, as the matter was now before the Committee on Privileges and Elections.

PAPERS FROM THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

The House sent to the Senate the following message:

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

COLUMBIA, S. C., December 7, 1876. Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate :

The House of Representatives respectfully informs your honorable body that Messrs. Holland, F. A. Palmer, Brown, Straker and Gaither have been appointed Committee on the part of the House, to join such Committee as may be appointed on the part of your bonorable body, to investigate the Hamburg, Rouse's Bridge and Ellenton riots.

Very respectfully, &c.

E. W. M. MACKEY, Speaker House of Representatives.

Messrs. Myers, Duncan, Corwin, were appointed Committee on the part of the Senate, and a message sent to the House of Representatives accordingly.

The House also sent to the Senate,

Concurrent resolution for the appointment of a Special Joint Committee to confer with the Congressional Committee.

Ordered for consideration to-morrow.

NOTICES OF BILLS.

Mr. MYERS gave notice that he will on to-morrow, or some subsequent day, ask leave to introduce:

Bill repealing the law empowering the City Council of Charleston to elect an Inspector General of timber and lumber;

Bill to better define the duties of the Board of Directors and Superiotendent of the South Carolina Penitentiary.

Mr. NASH gave notice that he will on to-morrow, or some subsequent day, ask leave to introduce

Bill to amend the law in relation to the appointment of Engrossing and Enrolling Clerks in the office of the Secretary of State.

Mr. TAFT gave notice that he will on tomorrow, or some subsequent day, ask leave to introduce

Joint Resolution relative to the election of Circuit Judges.

BILLS INTRODUCED. Mr. COCHRAN, pursuant to notice, introduced:

Bill to reduce and regulate the pay of officers, attachees, clerks and laborers of the General Assembly, and to provide the manner of electing, appointing and paying the same;

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