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ACT....III. SCENE I.

Olivia's Garden.

Enter VIOLA, and Clown, with a tabor.

Vio. Save thee, friend, and thy music: Dost thou live by thy tabor?

Clo. No, sir, I live by the church."
Vio. Art thou a churchman?

Clo. No such matter, sir; I do live by the church: for I do live at my house, and my house doth stand by the church.

Vio. So thou may’st say, the king lies by a beggar, 8 if a beggar dwell near him: or, the church stands by thy tabor, if thy tabor stand by the church.

Clo. You have said, sir,--To see this age!-A sentence is but a cheveril glove to a good wit; How quickly the wrong side may be turned outward !

Vio. Nay, that's certain; they, that dally nicely with words, may quickly make them wanton.

Clo. I would therefore, my sister had had no name, sir.

Vio. Why, man?

Clo. Why, sir, her name 's a word; and to dally with that word, might make my sister wantón: But indeed, words are very rascals, since bonds disgraced them.

by tby tabor ? Clo. No, sir, I live by tive church.] Tive Clown, I suppose, wilfully mistakes Viola's meaning, and answers, as if he had been asked whether he lived by the sign of the tabor, the ancient designation of a music shop. Sreevens.

It was likewise the sign of an cating-honse kept by Tarleton, the celebrated clown or fool of the theatre before our author's time, who is exhibited in a print prefixed to his Fests, quarto, 1611, with a tabor. Perhaps in imitation of him the subsequent stage-clowns usually appeared with one. Malone.

the king lies by a beggar,] Lies, here, as in many other places in old books, signifies-dwells, sojourns. See King Henry IV, P. II, Act, III, sc. ii Malone.

9- a cheveril gloves) i. e. a glove made of kid leather chevreau, Fr. So, in Romeo and Juliet: “--a wit of cheveril" Again, in a proverb in Ray's Collection: “He hath a conscience Like a cheverel's skin.” Steerens.

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Sir To. Shall this fellow live?

Fab. Though our silence be drawn from us with cars, yet peace.

knyfe, and spone afore hym, then kneel on your knee,” &c. These directions are to male servants. Lord Herbert of Cher. tury, in his life, speaking of dancing, recommends that accom. plishment to youth, " that he may know how to come in and go out of a room where company is, how to make courtesies Randsomely, according to the several degrees of persons he shall Cacounter." Eeed.

* Törugb our silence be drawn from us with cars,] i. e. though iz is tile greatest pain ta us to keep silence. Warburton.

I believe the true reading is: “ Tbougb our silence be drawn prom us with carts, yet peace. In The Two Gentlemen of Verona, one of the clowns says. I have a mistress, but who that is, e form of borses shall not pluck from 2:16." So, in this play; "Oxen and wainropes will not bring thcın together." Johnson.

The old reaching is cars, as I have printed it. It is well known 1. cats and carıs have the same meaning.

A. somewliat similar passage occurs in the cld play of King I ear, 1605: “

ten teame of borses shall not draw me away, 2.!! I have full and whole possession." Aing. I, but one teame and a cart will serve the turne,"

Steevens, li I were to suggest a word in the place of cars, which I think is a corruption, it should be cables. It may be worth remarking, :crl:aps, that the leading ideas of Malvolio, in his bumour of stare, bear a strong resemblance to those of Alnaschar, in The Arritian Nights" Entertainments. Somc of the expressions too are very similar. Tiro:bitt.

Mary Arabian fictions had found their way into obscure Latin and French books, and from thence into English ones, lorg before any professed version of The Arabian Nigbts' Entertain. mients had appeared. I meet with a story siinilar to that of Alnaschar, in The Dialoges of Creatures Moralysed, bl. 1. no date, Lut probably printed abroad: “It is but foly to hope to moche of vanyteys. Whereof it is tolde in fablys that a lady uppon a tyme delruered to her mayden a galon of inylke to sell at a cite, And by the waye as she sate and restid her by a dyche side, she .began to thinke ye with yt money of the mylke she volde bye an lenne, the which shulde bring forth chekyns, and whan they vere growyn to hennys she wolde sell them and by piggis, and cschaunge them into shepe, and the shepe into usen; and so whan she was come to richesse she sholde be maricd right worshipfully vnto some worthy man, and thus she reioycid. And whan she was thus meruelously comfortid, and rauished inwarde, ly in her secrete solace thinkyng with howe great ioyé she shruld be ledde towarde the churche with her husbond on horsebacke, she sayde to her self, Goo sce, goo wee, sodayneple she smote

Mal. I extend my hand to him thus, quenching my familiar smile with an austere regard of controul:

Sir To. And does not Toby take you a blow o' the lips then ?

Mal. Saying, Cousin Toby, my fortunes havirg cast me on your niece, give me this prerogative of speech:

Sir To. What, What?
Mal. You must amend your drunkenness.
Sir To. Out, scab!

Fab. Nay, patience, or we break the sinews of our plot.

Mal. Besides, you waste the treasure of your time with a foolish knight ;

Sir And. That 's me, I warrant you.
Mal. One Sir Andrew:
Sir And. I knew t’was I; for many do call me fool.
Mal. What employment have we here ?5

[Taking up the letter. Fab. Now is the woodcock near the gin.

Sir To. O peace! and the spirit of humours intimate reading aloud to him !

Mal. By my life this is my lady's hand: these be her very C's her U's and her Tos; and thus makes she her great P's. It is in contempt of question, her hand.

Sir And. Her C's her U's and her T's: Why that?

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the grounde with her fote, myndlynge to spurre the horse; but her fote slypped and she fell in the dych, and there lave all hur mylke; and so she was faire from her purpose, and neuer had that she hopid to haue.” Dial. 100, LL. ii, b. Stectens.

$ What employment have we bere.?] A phrase of that time, equivalent to our common specch--What's to do Lere.

Warburton. ber great P's.] In the direction of the letter which Malvolio reads, there is neither a C, nor a P, to be found.

Steevens. I am afraid some very coarse and valgar appellations are meant to be alkuded to by these capital letters. Blackstone.

This was perhaps ap oversight in Shakspeare; or rather, for the sake of the allusion hinted at in the preceding note, he chose not to attend to the words of the direction. It is remarkable, that in the repetition of the passages in letters, which have! been produced in a former part of a play, he very often makes! his characters deviate from the words before 'used, though they kare the paper,itscif in their hands, and though they appear to

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- Mal. I extend my hand to him thus, quenching my familiar smile with an austere regard of controul:

Sir To. And does not Toby take you a blow o' the lips then ?

Mal. Saying, Cousin Toby, my fortunes havirg cast me on your niece, give me this prerogative of speech:

Sir To. What, What ?
Mal. You musi amend your

drunkenness.
Sir To. Out, scab!

Fab. Nay, patience, or we break the sinews of our plot.

Mal. Besides, you waste the treasure of your time with a foolish knight;

Sir And. That's me, I warrant you.
Mal. One Sir Andrew:
Sir And. I knew t'was I; for

many

do call fool. Mal. What employment have we here ?5

[Taking up the letter. Fab. Now is the woodcock near the gin.

Sir To. O peace! and the spirit of humours intimate reading aloud to him!

Mal. By my life this is my lady's hand: these be her very C's her U's and her T's; and thus makes she her great P's. It is in contempt of question, her hand.

Sir And. Her C's her U's and her T's: Why that?

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the grounde with her fote, myndynge to spurre the horse; but her kote slypped and she fell in the dych, and there laye all h«r mylke; and so she was farre from her purpose, and neuer had that she hopid to haue.” Dial. 100, LL. ii, b. Steevens.

9 9 What employment bave we bere?] A phrase of that time, equivalent to our common speech--What's to do Lere.

Warburton, ber great P's.] In the direction of the letter which Malvolio reads, there is neither a C, nor a P, to be found.

Steevens. I am afraid some very coarse and rulgar appellations are meant to be alkuded to by these capital letters. Blackstone.

This was perhaps an oversight in Shakspeare; or rather, for the sake of the allusion hinted at in the preceding note, he chosc not to attend to the words of the direction. It is remarkable, that in the repetirion of the passages in letters, which have) been produced in a former part of a play, he very often makes! his characters deviate from the words before used, though ther? have the paper itself in their hands, and though they appear tor

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