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handkerchiefs of all kinds, at more than ten shil.receive, on any terms, or conditions whatever, any lings per dozen; cotton velvets, and all kind o of the goo's enumerated in the second resolution, cotton, or cotton and linen stuffs, bed-bunts, and that shall, or may be imported into this province, bed-ticking of all sorts, colton counterpanes and contrary to the intent and design of these resolucoverlids, British manufactured linens of all kinds tions, by any person whatever, or consigned to any ez cept scal.cloth, Irish and all foreign linens, abov: factor, agent, manager, or storekeeper here, by one shilling and six pence per yard; woolen cloth, any person residing in Great Britain, or elsewbere; above five quarters wide, of more than five sbillings and if any such goods shall be imported, we will per yard; narrow cloths of all sorts, of more tha not, upon any consideration whatever, rent or sell three shillings per yard; worsted stuffs of all sorts, to, or permit any way to be made use of by any above thirteen pence per yard; silk and worsted, such importer, his agent, factor, manager, or store. silk and cotton, silk and hair, and hair and worsted keeper, or any person, on his, or their behalf, any stuffs of all kinds, worsied and hair shags, mourn. store house, or other bouse, or any kind of place ing of all and every kind, stockings, caps, waistcoa: whatever, belonging to us, respectively, for expos. and breeches patterns of all kinds, rugs of all sorts, ing to sale, or even securing any such goods, nor above eight shillings; blankets, above five shillings, will we suffer any such to be put on sbore on our per blanket; mens and womens ready made clothes, respective properties. and wearing apparel of all kinds, bats of all kinds,

SIITELY, That if any person shall import, or of more than two shillings per bat; wigs, gloves, endeavor to import, from Great Britain or any and mits of all kinds, stays and bodices of all sorts, part of Europe, any goods whatever, contrary to boots, suddies, and all manufactures of leather, and the spirit and design of the foregoing resolutions, skins of all kinds, except mens and womens shoes, of or shall sell any goods wbich he has now, or may not more than four shillings per pair, whips, brushes, bereafter have on hand, or may import, on any and brooms of all sorts, gilt, and hair trunks, other terms than are herein expres-ed, we will not, paintings, carpets of all sorts, snuff boxes, snuff, at any time hereafter, deal with any such person, and other manufactured tobacco, soap, starck, his agent, manager, factor, or storekeeper, for any playing cards, dice, English china, English ware, commodity wbatever; and that such of us as are, in imitation of China, delph and stone ware, of all or may be sellers of goods, will not take any ad. sorts, excepi milk.pans, stone bottles, jugs, pitch- vantage of the scarcity of goods, that this agreeers, and chamber pots, marble and wrought stone ment may occasion, but will sell such as we have of any kind, excepi scythe-stones; mill stones, and now on hand, or may hereafter import, or bave for grind-stones, iron castings, ironmongery of all sale, at the respective usual and accustomed rates sorts, except nails; hoes, steel, handicraft and manu. for three years last past. facturers tools, locks, frying-pans, scythes and

SETENTILY, That we will not, during the time sickles, cutlery of all sorts, ercepe knives and forks, aforesaid, import into this province, any of the not exceeding three shillings per dozen; knives, goods above enumerated for non-importation in scissors, sheep shears, needles, pins and thimbles, the second resolution, which have been, or shall be razors, chirurgical instruments and spectacles, imported from Great Britain, or some part of Eu. cordage, or tarred rope of all sorts, seins, ships rope, from any colony, or province, which bath not colors ready made, ivory, korn, and bone ware of entered, or shall not, within two months from the all sorts, except combs.

date bereof, enter into resolutions of non-importaTHINDLY, That we will not, during the time tion, nor will we purchase, take up, or receive, on aforesaid, import any wines, of any kind whatever, any terms, or conditions whatever, any such goods, or purchase the same from any person whatever, from any person or persons, that may import the except such wines as are already imported, or for same; nor will we purchase, take up, or receive, on which orders are already sent.

any terms, or conditions, any of the said goods, FOURTILY, That we will not kill or suffer to be

which may be imported from any province, or co. killed, or sell, or dispose to any person, whom we

lony, which has entered, or may enter into such have reason to believe intends to kill, any ewe.

resolutions, unless a certificate shall accompany lamb that shall be yeaned before the first day of

such goods, under the hands of a committee of May in any year, during the time aforesaid.

merchants (if any) of the place from whence such

goods shall come or if no such committee, then FIFTHLY, That we will not, directly or indirectly, under the bands of at least three of the principal during the time aforesaid, purchase, take up, or i merchants there, who have entered into resolutions

of non importation, that such goods were imported Mr. John Merryman, who then had the carriage before such resolution was entered into in such thereof, (and who is now absent in Lordon) that place. And that we will not purchase, take up, he would not sign, unless he had liberty to send or receive, on any terms, or conditions whatever, off his orders for fall goods, and to import the after the expiration of six months, from the date same: That some few days afterwards Mr. Merryhereof, from any colony, or province aforesaid, any man informed him, that the merchants of the town of the said enumerated articles, which have been, would give leave to send off the orders, and receive or shall be imported from Great Britain. the fall goods; and that, in consequence of this

Eigetely, We, the tradesmen and manufac- information, he signed the agreement, without any furers, do likewise promise, and agree, that we such condition, written or expressed, in the same will not avail ourseives of the scarcity of European pposite to his name. After which the question goods, proceeding from the resolutions for non. was put, whether Mr. Noore should have liberty importation, to raise or enhance the prices of ibe to land and vend his whole cargo? Which was different articles, or commodities, by us wrought determined in the affirmative. up, or manufactured; but that we will sell and dis

For the AFFIRMATIVE.
Thomas E ving,

4 D Gough, pose of the same, at the usual and accustomed rates

Alexander M.Machen, Jonathan Plowman, we have done for these three years past.

Benjamin Rogers,

Richard Moule,

Archibald Buchanan, Lastly, That, if any person, or personis, what. Jonathan Hudson,

Murdock Kennedy, Hercules Courtenay, ever, shall oppose, or contravene the above resolu

Henry Brown,

John Macnabh, tions, or act in opposition to the true spirit and William Hammond, Charles Rogers, design thereof, we will consider him, or them, as

John A. Smith,
Andrew Buchanan,
John Deaver,

Thomas Place. enemies to the liberties of America, and treat them,

For the NEGATIVE on all occasions, with the contempt they deserve; John Moale,

Jolin Smith, provided that these resolutions shall be binding Henry Thompson, William Sinith,

Alexander Lawson, on us, for and during the continuance of the before William Lux, E. R.

Robert Chrisije, Ebenezer Mackie, mentioned act of parliament, unless a general meet. Robert Alexander, William Lux. ing of such persons al Annapolis, as may, at any The committee of enquiry baving also reported time hereafier, be requested by the people of the that Benjamin Howard had imported a cargo of several counties in this province to meet, for the goods, of the value of £1700 sterling, in the Lord purpose of considering the expediency of dispens. Cumbden, captain John Johnston, from London, which ing with the said resolutions, or any of them, not they were in doubt were not within the terms of exceeding four from each county, or a majority of the association of 30th March. Upon which the such of them as shall attend, shall determine other following question was put, whether Benjamin wise.

Iloward be permitted to land and vend the said At a meeting of the merchants, and others, in.

cargo, he having alleged that he never signed habitants of Baltimore county, associators for non libe association of the 30th March, being then an importation of European goods, beld at Mr. Little's, inhabitant of Anne-Arundel couniy, and that he November 14, 1769,

apprehended he was entitled to import within the Joux SMITH, chairman

terms of the general association of the 22d June, The committee of enquiry having reported, that to which he was a subscriber, his orders for the William Moore, jun, had imported a cargo of goods said cargo having been transmitted the 1st of May. in the Lord Cambden, captain John Johnston, from Resolved in the affirmative. London, of the value of £9.0 sterling, which they

For the AFFIRMATIVE. were in doubt were not within the terms of the Thomas Ewing,

H. D. Gough,

Jonathan Plwman, association. The following question was put, whe Alexander M.Machen,

Benjamin Roge: S,

Richard Moale, ther William Moore, jun. bas imported the said Jonathan Hudson, Archibal} Buchanan,

Murdock Kennedy, cargo within the terms mentioned in the agreemeni Thomas Place,

Henry Thompson,

Jashn Moale, of the 30th of March last, to which he was a signer?

Henry Brown,

John Macnabb, Upon which question, the gentlemen present were Villiam Hammond, Charles Rigers,

John A. Smith, unanimously of opinion, that the said cargo was Indrew Buchanan,

Hercules Courtenay. imporied contrary to that agreement: of which, John Deaver,

Fur the NEGATIVE. determination William Moore being informed, ke

John Smith,

Evenez: Mackie, alleged, as a justification of his conduct, that a' Robert Christie, Airxander Lauson,

William Lux. the time he signed the agreement, he objected to. Willian Smiili,

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PHILADELPUJA, January 3, 1774. rica, subject to the payment of duties on its being The unanimity, spirit and zeal, which have here- landed here, is an open attempt to enforce this tofore animated all the colonies, from Boston te ministerial plan, and a violent attack upon the South Carolina, have been so eminently displayed liberties of America. in the opposition to the pernicious project of the

6. That it is the duty of every American to opEast India company, in sending tea to America,

pose this attempt. while it remains subject to a duty, and the Americans at the same time confined by the stronges

7. That whoever shall, directly or indirectly, prohibitory laws to import it only from Great Bri.

countenance this attempt, or in any wise aid or tain, that a particular account of the transactions

abet in unloading, receiving, or vending the tea of this city cannot but be acceptable to all our

sent, or to be sent out by the East-India company,

wbile it remains subject to the payment of a duty readers, and every other friend of American liberty.

here, is an enemy to bis country. Upon the first advice of this measure, a general

8. That a committee be immediately chosen to dissatisfaction was expressed, tbat, at a time when wait on those gentlemen who, it is reported, are we were struggling with this oppressive act, and appointed by the East-India company to receive, an agreement subsisting not to import tea while and sell the said tea, and request them, from a subject to the duty, our fellow subjects in Eng. regard to their own character, and the peace and land should form a measure so directly tending to good order of the city and province, immediately enforce that act, and again embroil us with our to resign their appointment. parent state. When it was also considered, that the proposed mode of disposing of the tea, tended

In consequence of this appointment, the comto a monopoly, ever odious in a free country,

mittee waited upon the gentlemen in this city, who universal disapprobation shewed itself throughout had been appointed consignees of the expected the city. A public meeting of the inhabitants was cargo. They represented to them the detestation beld at the state house on the 18th October, at and abhorrence in which this measure was held which great numbers attended, and the sense of by their fellow-citizens, the danger and difficulties the city was expressed in the following resolves which must attend the execation of so odious e

trust, and expressed the united desire of the city, 1. That the disposal of their own property is the that they would renounce the commission, and inberent rights of freemen; that there can be no engage not to intermeddle with the ship or cargo property in that which another can, of right, take in any shape whatever. Some of the commissioners from us without our consent; that the claim of resigned, in a manner that gave general satisfaction, parliament to tax America is, in other words, a others, in such equivocal terms as required further claim of right to levy contributions on us at plea explanation. However in a few days the resigna.

tion was complete. - In this situation things remain2. That the duty imposed by parliament upon

ed for a few days. In the mean time, the general tea landed in America, is a tax on the Americans,

spirit and indignation rose to such a beighth, that or levying contributions on them without their con

it was thought proper to call another general meet. sent.

ing of the principal citizens to consider and resolver

upon such farther steps as might give weight, and 3. That the express purpose for which the tax insure success to the unanimous opposition now is levyed on the Americans, namely, for the sup- formed. Accordingly a meeting was held, for the port of government, administration of justice, and above purpose, at which a great number of respectdefence of his majesty's dominions in America, has able inbabitants attended; and it appeared to be a direct tendency to render assemblies useless, and the unanimous opinion tbat the entry of the ship to introduce arbitrary government and slavery. at the custom-bouse, or the landing any part of

ther cargo, would be attended with great danger 4. That a virtuous and steady opposition to this

and difficulty, and would directly tend to destroy ministerial plan of governing America, is absolutely that peace and good order which ought to be necessary to preserve even the shadow of liberty

, preserved. -An addition of twelve other gentle and is a duty which every freeman in America owes

men was then made to the former committee, and to bis country, to himself and to his posterity.

the general meeting adjourned till the arrival of 5. That the resolution lately entered into by the the tea ship. Information being given of that, the East.India company to send out their tea to Ame-Iprice of tea wus suddenly advanced, though it was

sure.

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owing to a general scarcity of that article; yet all, a number of persons, where he was soon convinced the possessors of tea, in order to give strength to of the truth and propriety of the representations the opposition, readily agreed to reduce the price, which had been made to bim-and agreed that, and sell what remained in their hands at a reason. upon the desire of the inhabitants being publicly able rate. Nothing now remained, but to keep up expressed, he would conduct himself accordingly. a proper correspondence and connection with the Some small rudeness being offered to the captain other colonies, and to take all prudent and proper afterwards in the street, by some boys, several precautions on the arrival of the tea ship. gentlemen interposed, and suppressed it before he

received the least injury. Upon an hour's notice. It is not easy to describe the anxiety and suspense

on Monday morning, a public meeting was called, of the city in this interval. Sundry reports of her

and the state-house not being sufficient to hold arrival were received, which proved premature.

the numbers assembled, they adjourned into the But on Saturday evening the 25th ult. an express

square. This meeting is allowed by all to be the came up from Chester, to inform the town, that

most respectable, both in the numbers and rank of the tea ship, commanded by captain Ayres, with those who attended it, that has been known in this ber detested cargo, was arrived there, having city. After a short introduction, the following followed another ship up the river so far.

resolutions were not only agreed to, but the public The committee met early the next morning, and approbation testified in the warmast manner. being apprized of the arrival of Mr. Gilbert Barclay,

1. Resolved, That the tea, on board the ship the other consignee, who came passenger in the

Polly, captain Ayres, shall not be landed. sbip, they immediately went in a body to request bis renunciation of the commission. Mr. Barclay 2. That captain Ayres shall neither enter nor politely attended the committee, at the first re. report his vessel at the custom-house. quest; and being made acquainted with the senti.

3. That captain Ayres shall carry back the tea ments of the city, and the danger to which the

immediately. public liberties of America were exposed by this measure, he, after expressing the particular bard. 4. That captain Ayres shall inomediately send a ship of bis situation, also resigned the commission, pilot on board his vessel, with orders to take charge in a manner which affected every one present.

of ber, and proceed to Reedy-island next high

water. The committee then appointed three of their

5. That the captain shall be allowed to stay in members to go to Chester, and two others to

town till to-morrow, to provide necessaries for his Gloucester point, in order to have the earliest opportunity of meeting capt. Ayres, and representing voyage. to bime the sense of the public, respecting his 6. That he shall then be obliged to leave the town voyage and cargo.' The gentlemen who had set and proceed to his vessel, and make the best of his out for Chester, receiving intelligence that the way out of our river and bay. vessel had weighed anchor about 12 o'clock, and

7. That a committee of four gentlemen be approceeded to town, returned. About 2 o'clock she

pointed to see these resolves carried into execuappeared in sight of Gloucester point, where a

tion. number of inhabitants from the town had assembled with the gentlemen from the committee. As she The assembly were then informed of the spirit passed along, she was bailed, and the captain re. and resolution of New.York, Charleston, South quested not to proceed further, but to come on Carolina, and the conduct of the people of Boston, shore. This the captain complied with, and was whereupon it was unanimously resolvedhanded through a lane made by the people, to the

That this assembly highly approve of the congentlemen appointed to confer with him. They duct and spirit of the people of New-York Charrepresented to him the general sentiments, toge: leston, and Boston, and return their hearty thanks ther with the danger and difficulties that would

to the people of Boston for their resolution in attend his refusal to comply with the wishes of

destroying the tei, rather than suffering it to be the inhabitants; and finally desired him to proceed

landed. with them to town, where he would be more fully informed of the temper and resolution of the peo The whole business was conducted with a de. ple. He was accordingly accompanied to town by corum and order worthy the importance of the

cause. Captain Ayres being present at this meet. That all legal and constitutional means ought to ing, solemnly and publicly engaged, that he would be used by all America, for procuring a repeal of literally comply with the sense of the city, as ex. the said act of parliament. pressed in the above resolutions.

That the only effectual means of obtaining such A proper supply of necessaries and fresh pro- repeal, they are at present of opinion, is an associa. visions being then procured, in about two hours tion, under the strongest ties, for breaking off all the tea ship weighed anchor from Gloucester-point, commercial connections with Great Britain, until where she lay within sight of the town, and has the said act of parliament be repealed, and the proceeded, with her whole cargo, on her return to right assumed by parliament for taxing America, the East-India company.

in all cases whatsoever, be given up, and American

freedom ascertained and settled upon a permanent The public think the conduct of those gentle.

constitutional foundation. men, whose goods are returned on board the tea ship, ought not to pass unnoticed, as they have,

That the most practicable mode of forming such upon this occasion, generously sacrificed their

an effectual association, they conceive to be a ge. private interest to the public good.

neral meeting of the gentlemen, who are already Thus this important affair, in which there has or shall be appointed committees, to form an Ame. been so glorious an exertion of public virtue and rican intercourse and correspondence upon this spirii, has been brought to a happy issue; by which most interesting occasion. the force of a law so obstinately persisted in, to the

That in the mean time they will form such par. prejudice of the national commerce, for the sake

licular associations as to them shall seem effectual; of the principle on włicb it is founded, (a right of taxing the Americans without their consent) has yet professing themselves ready to join in any been effectually broken-and the foundations of

reasonable general one that may be devised as

aforesaid. American liberty more deeply laid than ever.

That these sentiments be immediately forwarded

to be printed in the Maryland and Pennsylvania ANNAPOLIS, June 9, 1774

Gazettes. At a meeting of a considerable number of the magistrates, and other the most respectable

That Edward Tilghman, Solomon Wright, Tur. inhabitants of Queen-Anne's county, at Queen's but Wright, John Brown, Richard Tilgh tian town, on the thirtieth day of May, 1774, in or.

Farle, James Hollyday, Thomas Wright, William der to deliberate upon the tendency and effect Hemsley, Adam Gray, Clement Sewell, Richard of the act of parliament for blocking up the port

Tilghman, James Kent, John Kerr, James Bordley,

and William Bruff, be a committee of corresponand barbor of Boston.

dence and intercourse, until some alteration is Duly considering and deeply affected with the made in this appointment by a more general meetprospect of the unhappy situation of Great Britain ing. and British America, under any kind of disunion, Attested by~ this meeting think themselves obliged, by all the

JAMES EARLE, clk. com. ties which ever ought to preserve a firm union amongst Americans, as speedily as possible to Ata general meeting of the freeholders, gentlemen, make known their sentiments to their distressed

merchants, tradesmen, and other inhabitants of brethren of Boston; and therefore publish to the Baltimore county, held at the court house of world,

the said county, on Tuesday the 31st of May, Tbat they look upon the cause of Boston in its

1774, consequences to be the common cause of America.

Captain CHARLES RIDGELY, chairman

I. Resolved, That it is the opinion of this meet. That the act of parliament for blocking up the fing, that the town of Boston is now suffering in. port and harbor of Boston, appears to them a cruel the common cause of America, and that it is the and oppressive invasion of their natural rights, as duty of every colony in America to unite in the men, and constitutional rights as English subjects, most effectual means to obtain a repeal of the late and if not repealed, will be a foundation for the act of parliament for blocking up the harbor of utter destruction of American freedom.

Boston.-Distentient three.

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