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INDEX II.

MISCELLANEOUS SUBJECTS.

A.

ACT of Parliament to prevent abuses in Plays, 25, 224.
Addison, his opinion of the Stage, 105. His wit, 198, 205.
Adulteress, how far it is right to restore her to her husband and to

society, on her repentance, 244.
Æschylus, 102.
Aldborough, a Play represented there, 151.
Amusements, should tend to promote the glory of God, 4. Of the

lower ranks, should be open to the higher, 187.
Andrews, Bishop, his opinion of the abuses of the Stage, and of the

Pulpit, 103.
Angels, invoked in Plays, 25, 127. Represented on the Stage, 27,

138. Invoked on Mrs. Unwin's monument, 128. In the

Christiad, 129.
Anti-Jacobin, Poetry of, 198.
Aristophanes, a favourite author with St. Chrysostom, 104. Cora

ruption of the Stage in his time, 221.
Aristotle, his opinion of the Stage, 107.
Audience, Duties of in a Theatre, 92. Proper interference, 216,

223.
Authors, See Writers for the Stage.

B.,

Bacon, Lord, on works of imagination, 220.
Bates, Ely, Esq. his Rural Philosophy, quoted, 217, 248.
Barker, the Painter, his Paintings of humble life, 188.
Barrow, Dr. Isaac, his Sermon on Wit, quoted, 46, 63, 65.

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Barrow, Dr. William, his opinion of the Stage, and of players, 1181
Barruel, Abbé, his Memoirs of Jacobinism, quoted, 215.
Bath Guide, 198.
Bedford, Arthur, his Serious Remonstrance against the Stage, quoted,

26, 35, 156, 221, 261. Objects only to the abuse of it, 107.
Behn, Mrs, immorality of her Plays, 257.
Bellerose, the Player, good consequences of his seriousness in speak-

ing religious sentiments, 230.
Berquin, Monsieur, his Dramas, 115.
Bigg, the Painter, his paintings of humble life, 188.
Biographia Britannica, quoted, 174.
Biographia Dramatica, quoted, 4, 72, 99, 175, 212.
Blackmore, Sir Richard, his opinion of the Stage, 105. His Essays,

quoted, 105, 213.
Blackwall's Sacred Classics, quoted, 102.
Blair, Hugh, D. D. his opinion of the Stage, 112. Lectures, quoted,

193, 214. Character of Voltaire's Plays, ditto.""
Boerhaave, his opinion of wit, 197.
Bowdler, Thomas, Esq. Editor of the Family Shakspeare, 222.
British Critic, quoted, 215.
Budgel, Eustace, his suicide attributed to the principles he imbibed

from Addison's Cato, 35, 167. probable solution of it, 167.
Budruorth, Captain, his Ramble to the Lakes, quoted,"189.
Bulstrode, Judge, his Charge to the Grand Jury of Middlesex,

quoted, 259.
Burder, Rev. G. his Village Sermons, quoted; 259.
Byrom, his character as a Poet, 217,

C.

Cambridge Chronicle, quoted, 146
Chamberlain, Lord, his important duties, 83, 222, 261. Yet rarely

interferes, except on political grounds, 83, 221, 261. Interferes

at the Opera, 222.
Cheap Repository Tracts, 183, 189, 190, 238.
Chorus, the Greek, origin of it, 9, the use of it, 176.
Christian Observer, quoted, 142, 145, 227.
Christian Religion, doctrines and duties of it, may be mentioned

with propriety on the Stage, 41, 190, &c. Examples in
opposition to it, 168. Ought to appear in the writings of
poets, 75, &c. Spoken of profanely, 132–135.

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Chrysostom,,St. his fondness for the writings of Aristophanes, 104.
Collier, Jeremy, bis short view of the Immorality, &c. of the Stage,

quoted, 35, 36, 37, 92, 144, 164, 221, 259, 261. The effect
of his book on the public, 97, 224. His objections only to the
abuses of the Stage, 106, 107. His Defence of the Short
View, 211. Answer to The ancient and modern Stages sur-

veyed, 221, 230.
Colman, George, the younger, 257. See Inkle and Yarico, Battle of

Hexham, Surrender of Calais, Mountaineers, Poor Gentleman,

and John Bull.
Comedy, whether a lawful species of drama, 45, 66. Middle, 221.

Some good ones noticed, 199.
Congreve, 164, 235, 240, 244, 257. Character of his writings, by

Lord Kaims, 214.
Conjurers, exhibited on the Stage, 28. Prosecution of one, 145.
Courier, Newspaper, quoted, 146, 216, 223, 262.
Covent Garden Theatre, hint respecting the Plays on the opening the

New Theatre, 224.
Cowper, William, his opinion of Dr. Hurdis's Play, 117.

His wit,
198. Remarks on ditto, 202. Character of Voltaire, 215.

His character as a Poet, 217. His Task, quoted, 247.
Creation, improper use of the word, 157.
Cumberland, Richard, Esq. his Rise and Progress of the English Stage,

quoted, 103, 107, 224, 227. A Dramatic writer, 117.
Calvary, invocations in, 131. Observer, referred to, 181..

Pieces refused licence by the Lord Chamberlain, 222.
Cursing and Swearing, on the Stage, 25, 30, 148, 155. Palliated by
Sterne in his story of Le Fevre, 172.

D.

Davenant, Sir William, first introduced female performers on the

Stage, 237.
Davis's Life of Garrick, quoted, 97, 173, 210, 227, 229.
*Deaths improperly represented on the Stage, 35, 172, 173. Properly,

172.
Dibdin, Charles, his History of the Stage, quoted, 106, 213, 224,

228, 229, 230, 235, 237. Professional Life, 106. Opinion
of the Stage, 117. His Songs, quoted, 154. Sailors' Songs,

181, Note.
Dodd, Dr. William, his Thoughts in Prison, 136, 143.

Doddridge, Dr. his Family Expositor, quoted, 13, 55.
Dodsley, R. Commendable instance of amending faults in a play, 216,
Doggett, the player, his character, 235.
Donne, Dr. his Satires, 198,
Douglas, Mrs. her opinion of the Stage, 113.
Drama. See Stage. The most natural mode of imitation, 101. '
Dramatic Censor, 261.
Press, to be subject to the laws of God, and tend to promote his

glory, 3.
Dryden, his repentance for his profligate writings, 213. Mentioned,

240, 257.
Duelling taught on the Stage, 34, Lesson against it, 166.
Dunlop, Rev.-His Sermons, quoted, 207, 234.
Durham, (Barrington) Bishop of, interferes respecting the Opera,

222.

E.

Eating and drinking, to be subject to the laws of God, and tend to

promote his glory, 2, 15.
Encyclopedia Britannica, quoted, 197, 213.
Euripides, 102, his idea of the duties of an author, 221.
Eurqatisa, the meaning of it, 54.

F.

Fairies, 142. Christian Observer on them, ditto. Jones, 143,
Farquhar, 164, 223.
Fate, one of the deities of the Stage, 27, 135.
Fennel, 11r. his Theatrical Guardian, 261.
Fielding, Sir John, requests Garrick not to have the Beggar's Opera

performed, 174,
Fletcher, Andrew, 109.
Fontaine, his repentance for his immoral writings, 213,
Foote, Samuel, his wit, 204.
Forbes, Sir William, his Life of Dr. Beattie, referred to, 143, 228.
Fortune, one of the deities of the Stage, 27, 136.
Fortune-Tellers, 145.
Foster, John, his Essay on Evangelical Religion, being unacceptable

to Persons of Taste, quoted, 75, &c. 123, 145, 172, 176,
205, 217.

G.

Gainsborough, the Painter, his paintings of humble life, 188.
Garrick, David, 174, 234, 236. Improved the Stage, 209, 223,

227. His Character, 226.
Gay, his Beggar's Opera, 174, 235.
Gellert, Professor, his opinion of the Stage, 113, writes moral plays,

ditto.
Genlis, Madame, her Dramas, 113.
Ghosts, or departed Spirits, represented on the Stage, 27, 143,

Invok'd by Poets, 128. Belief in them kept up, in some

measure, by Ossian, and other Poems, 144.
Gilpin, Rev. William, his Exposition of the New Testament, quoted,

102. His opinion of the Stage, 113. Dialogues, 183. Pro-

poses to have Theatres for different classes of persons, 187.
Gisborne, Rev. Thomas. His Duties of Women, quoted on the sub-
ject of the Stage, 83, 118, 174, 216.

His character as a
Poet, 217.
God, the name of, profanely introduced on the Stage, 26. Intro

duced with propriety, 26.
Gray's Key to the Old Testament, quoted, 10, 11.
Gregory, Dr. his opinion of the Stage, 112.
Griffith, Mrs. her Morality of Shakspeare's Drama Illustrated, 223.

H.

Hall, Bishop, his Satires, 198.
Hamilton, Miss, her Memoirs of Agrippina, 176.
Hamond's Precepts, quoted, 200.
Handel, Commemoration of, in Westminster Abbey, 185, 186.
Hanway, Jonas, his opinion of the Stage, 109, 249.
Heathenism, introduced in Plays, 25, 122, 138. and elsewhere, 77,

123. Remarks on, 218.
Heaven, represented on the Stage, 27, 144.
Hell, represented on the Stage, 27, 144.
Henry, Matthew, his Exposition of the Bible, quoted on the subject

of Wit, 55. Opinion of the Stage, 101.
Herbert, George, his opinion respecting Sermons, 103.
Hey, Dr. John, paper on Patronage attributed to him, quoted, 21,

His hypothesis respecting Ridicule, 48, &c. His Lectures

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