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74. An act to prevent the selling of spirituous liquors to Indians.

75. An act to punish the venders of unwholesome liquors and provisions.

76. An act to prevent private lotteries. 77. An act to prohibit the sale of lottery tickets. 78. An act to regulate general proceedings in criminal cases. 79. An act relative to proceedings in criminal cases. 80. An act for providing and regulating prisons.

81. An act declaring the law concerning the escape of prisoners in certain cases.

82. An act concerning fines, penalties, and forfeitures.

83. An act for the better apprehending of felons and other offenders.

84. An act to provide for the inspection of certain articles therein mentioned.

85. An act to provide for the inspection of leather. 86. An act concerning apprentices and servants. 87. An act to regulate weights and measures. 88. An act to provide a standard for the weight of grain. 89. An act for the regulation of mills and mill ponds. 90. An act fixing the rate of toll for grinding. 91. An act relative to banking institutions. 92. An act to restrain unincorporated banking associations. 93. An act to prevent the vacation of offices in certain cases. 94. An act concerning district surveyors.

95. An act to prescribe the tenure of office of auctioneers, and to levy a duty upon sales at auction in certain cases.

96. An act to provide for the incorporation of religious societies.

97. An act concerning religious societies.

98. An act to protect missionary societies in the territory of Michigan, for the education of Indians, and other persons of Indian habits.

99. An act to incorporate medical societies, for the purpose of regulating the practice of physic and surgery in the territory of Michigan.

100. An act to establish and regulate social libraries.

101. An act to provide for the preservation of the public health in the city of Detroit, and other places in the territory of Michigan.

102. An act for the limitation of suits on pénal statutes, criminal prosecutions, and actions at law.

103. An act relative to oaths and affidavits.

104. An act to enable infants who are seized or possessed of estates in trust, or by way of mortgage, to make conveyances of the same.

105. An act to amend “ An act concerning Bail.”

106. An act to provide for the collection of fees in certain cases.

107. An act to amend an act entitled “ An act to establish circuit courts in certain counties, and to define their powers and duties.”

108. An act to repeal a part of the act entitled “ An act for the punishment of crimes.”

109. An act to lay off and organize the counties west of the Mississippi river.

110. An act to repeal an act giving justices of the peace jurisdiction in criminal cases, approved March 4, 1831.

111. An act to amend an act entitled “ An act to provide for the assessment and collection of territorial taxes.”

112. An act making certificates of the purchase of public lands, evidence of possession.

113. An act to regulate public stages.

114. An act to provide compensation to grand and petit jurors.

115. An act to authorize justices of the peace and notaries public to administer oaths, and declaring certain oaths already taken valid.

116. An act to abolish the office of register of probate, and for other purposes.

117. An act concerning the powers of sheriff and constables in certain cases.

118. An act to prevent the exercise of a foreign jurisdiction within the limits of the territory of Michigan.

119. An act amendatory to an act concerning habitual drunkards, and to protect their estates, approved the 12th of April, 1827.

120. An act to authorize husbands to prosecute and defend suits in certain cases.

121. An act to amend an act entitled “ An act allowing and regulating writs of replevin.

122. An act to continue and enforce certain fines, penalties, and forfeitures.

123. An act to amend an act entitled “ An act to establish circuit courts in certain counties, and to define their powers and duties.

124. An act to regulate the weight of hay.

125. An act in relation to affidavits taken, and other judicial proceedings held in other states and foreign countries.

NO. 9.

EVIDENCE TAKEN BY THE COMMITTEE APPOINT

ED TO INVESTIGATE THE TRUTH OF CHARGES MADE AGAINST A. W. MGREGOR.

Tuesday evening, Dec. 5, 1837. John Wilson, being duly sworn, stated that the affidavit, as exhibited and marked A, was sworn to and subscribed by him ; that it does not contain all facts, but is true as far as stated; that there are other facts not stated in the affidavit connected with the subject. At the time of the conversation before the election, M'Gregor stated, as in the affidavit, that he was a candidate to fill the vacancy, and requested deponent's assistance, which deponent promised, for which M Gregor stated that he would assist deponent in getting a charter for a ferry privilege. Wilson then said if M Gregor would so assist as to get a charter, the said M Gregor should have a hundred dollars, when M'Gregor said he would do his best to secure Wilson a charter; for which deponent also promised to assist him in his election; that he did assist him, and voted for him. They had different conversations respecting the charter--whether it would be best to present by petition or motion, and concluded that it would be best to present it by motion. On the Friday previous to the sitting of the legislature, deponent ascertained that there was a petition in circulation for a charter for a ferry from Stephenson to Davenport; deponent then went to M Gregor and told him of this circumstance, and told him that as this petition was in circulation, it would be best for deponent to have one, to which M'Gregor assented; upon which M Gregor drew a petition and copy, the same as presented to the Council. Deponent then renewed the promise of $100 for M'Gregor's assistance in getting a charter, and M Gregor promised his assistance in getting a charter. M Gregor calculated to start for Burlington on the Saturday or Sunday after, and it was understood that deponent should get there as soon after the Monday or Tuesday following, with the petitions and titles of the ferry privileges, as possible, as it was calculated it would take some few days to organize the legislature. On Thursday after, deponent came to Burlington with the petition and papers, and presented them to M Gregor, who told him that the house had not yet organized so as to proceed to business, some officer not having been elected; but that as soon as the house was organized to do business, he would present deponent's petitions. The promise of the $100 was then again renewed. Deponent then had business at St. Louis and Carrollton, Ill., to which places he calculated to go as soon as possible, and Mr. M Gregor concluded that deponent had better go on-that he would be able to get back before he would be wanted. So deponent starts on the same day, Thursday evening, for the above named places, in the same boat in which he arrived. Deponent got back to Burlington on Tuesday, the 28th ult., went immediately to M Gregor, and inquired about his petition; whether or not it had been presented by him. M Gregor said he had not presented it. Deponent then asked why; and M Gregor stated that a petition had been sent to him during deponent's absence, for a charter for a company, and he said he had not, that he thought he would leave it until deponent's return. Conversation then occurred as to the manner in which deponent should proceed ; whether it would be best for him to have his petitions presented by M‘Gregor, with a statement by the latter to the house of circumstances, or pursue some other course. M'Gregor said it would look awkward in him to present two petitions, one from the company and one from deponent. Deponent then told MʻGregor he expected the latter would attend to it, with the promise again of $100 if the charter was secured. There was other conversation respecting the charter for the company, and he proposed that deponent should take an interest in the company; that it would be easier to get a charter for a company than for an individual. Deponent then

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