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9................ --------- “The whirling wheel.” Cf. Cons., ii. pr. 2, 28-9; tr. 871-2, &c. 15........................ “Contentment commended.” Cf. Cons., ii. pr. 1, 47; tr. 800-1. 17........................ “The heavenly home.” Cf. Cons., i. pr. 5, 9 and 11; tr. 561-2 and 565-6. Cf. Cons., iii. pr. 12, 27; tr. 2911. Cf. Cons., iv. pr. 1, 32 and 35; tr. 3128 and 3132. Cf. Cons., iv. m. 1, 25; tr. 3159 and 3132. Cf. Cons., v. pr. 1, 9 ; tr. 4305. 18........................ “Man addressed as a beast.” Cf. Cons., iii. pr. 3, 1; tr. 1888. Cf. Cons., iv. pr. 3, 66; tr. 3478. Cf. Cons., iv. m. 3, passim. Cf. Cons., iv. pr. 4, 3; tr. 3519. 19........................“The heavenly home.” See above on 1. 17. Ib........................“Look up.”” Cf. Cons., v. m. 5, 10-3; tr. 4968-72.

A BALLADE (p. 296).

For the general idea, and the definition of gentility, cf. Cons., iii. pr.6, 20-7; tr. 2150-63; and m. 6, 1-2 and 6-9; tr. 2164-6 and 2170-5.

AETAS PRIMA.

For the general idea, and the former age, cf. Cons., ii. m. 5.

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Since chapter vi. passed through the press, Professor Skeat has announced his discovery that the originals of the notes and glosses in Chaucer's translation are to be found in the Cambridge MS., Ii. 3, 21. (See ‘The Athenaeum’ of Oct. 24, 1891.

INDEX.

Abelard, 110, 201.
Acacius, 156, 158.
Accidents, the cause of plurality,
111.

Ado of Vienne, 3.

Adunatio, 146, 155.

'Ayamj, 84.

Alain de Lille, 239.

Alberto della Piagentina, 232, 233.

Albinus, 31, 36.

'Alcibiades, Second,' 103, 104.

Alcuin, 2, 109, 169, 242.

Alfred, King, renaissance of letters
under, 170—as a popular educa-
tor, 171, 172—his translation of
the 'Cons.,' 170-178—his genius,
175—his method of translating,
174 — his deviations from the
Latin, 176-178—metrical trans,
attributed to, 175 n.—his anti-
pathy to Theodoric, 173 — the
Saxon chronicle and, 172.

Alphonso de la Torre, 239.

A Iternus amor, 89.

Amalsuntha, 51.

Amat, 236.

'Aineto' of Boccaccio, the, 239.
Andreas, 237.

'Auecdoton Holderi,' the, de-
scribed, 11-13 — its evidential
value, 13, 14—Hodgkin and, 13
—medieval tradition of the tracts
compared with, 109—tracts II.
and III. not mentioned by name
in, 127.

1 Anecdotorum Thesaurus.' See
Pezius.

Angelica virtus, 68, 87.

Anglo-Norman literature, 198.

Anglo-Saxon literature, influence
of Boethius on. See Alfred and
Beowulf.

Anician gens, 27.

Anima natural, 82.

Anima rerum, 82.

Anonymous French translations of
the 'Cons.' (xiii. cent.), 200-206
—(xiv. cent.) 208-213 —(by an
Italian) 213.

'Anonymus Valesii,' the, date
and author of, 30—on the trial
of Boethius and Symmachus, 31,
32—on the mission of Pope John,
33 —evidential value of, 34.

'Apokolakuntosis Claudii,' 74.

Arabic translation of Aristotle,
244, 245.

Archimedes, translated by Boethi-
us, 26.

Argelati, 232, 234.

Arians, the. 111, 113, 120—procla-
mation of Zeno against, 33.

Aristotle, translated by Boethius,
26, 27—his influence on Boethius,
81, 85, 91, 100, 104, 105, 113,
118, 119, 124, 143, 145, 254 —
Boethius at variance with, 122,
155—5at, of, 84, 143—his theory
of the universe, 85—his defini-
tion of chance, 91, of relation,
122—on genera and species, 247,
248,250,251-in the middle ages,
168, 169.

Arnold, G., 4.

Athalaric, 46, 51.

Augustine, St, on God's existence,
86, 87—and sin, 92, 97 n.—and
the resurrection, 99 — and the
doctrine of the Trinity, 110, 120
—Boethius's dependence on, 118,

. 128, 129-treatise on the 'Cate-
gories ' attributed to, 245.

Angustulus, 17.

Avarice condemned, 61.

Averrhocs, 244.

Avicenna, 244.

Basilius the informer, 36, 48, 49.
Baur, G., 8.

Beda's ' Ecclesiastical History,' 172.

Being, essence of, 244.

'Beowulf,' subject of, 163 — pos-
sible author of, 164 n.—philo-
sophical element in, 164, sug-
gested by the 'Cons.,' 167-169.

Bernard Silvester, 239.

Bernard, St, 130, 131.

Berti, P., 7. -

Betant, 235.

Biraghi and the diptvch of Monza,
10,140.

Bird, a symbol for the soul, 187 n.
Boccaccio, and Chaucer, 215, 216—

the 'Ameto' of, 239.
'Boece,' Chaucer's. See Chaucer.
'Boece,' Provencal poem, 178-189

—MS. of, 179—a fragment, 179,

189 — metrical construction of,

189.

Boethius, A. M. S. I. Life and
Character. — Birth and parent-
age, 23—ancestry, 27—his gusrd-
ians, 24—his wife, 24, 60—not
twice married, 24—first acquain-
tance with Theodoric, 25—pat-
rician and senator, 27—consul,

27, 28—consulship of his sons,

28, 60—panegyrist, 29—master
of the offices, 29—trial of, 29, 31,
35 — his apology, 35-41 — im-
prisonment and death, 31, 32,
55; and see ' Anonymus Valesii'
—not a martyr, 2,140—his learn-
ing and accomplishments, 25,
26 — a musician, 26, 28 — a
mechanician, ib.—a mathemati-
cian, ib., 137—a poet, 57 n., 106—
a Christian controversialist, 27;
and see 'Theological Tracts '—his

personal character, 50, 53—his
impatience, 49, 50, 53, 54, 110,
137—a defender of the oppressed,
35 n. — his ambition, 61 — his
qualities as a statesman, 28, 49,
52, 53.

II. Philosophy.— His philoso-
phical system, 81-107—his theol-
ogy, 81-84 — his theory of the
universe, 84-90—his conception
of evil, 91—his psychology, 92-
94—his ethic, 95—his views on
sin, 100—a realist? 93, 249—the
pioneer of the scholastic philoso-
phy, 27—his position with regard
to the scholastic problem, 241-
257 — influenced by Aristotle,
Plato, Augustine, etc., see under
these names —at variance with
Aristotle, 155.

III. Religion.—Question of his
Christianity, 1-14—an outward
adherent to Christianity, 6, 104
—points of contact with Chris-
tianity, 81, 102-104—points of
divergence from Christianity,
54, 81-92, 95-104.

IV. Works, style, influence,
etc.—His literary motive, 26—
his translations of Pythagoras,
Ptolemy, Nicomachus, Euclid,
Archimedes, 26—of Aristotle,
ib., 27—of Porphyry, 94 ; and see
'Isagoge'—Original work; see
'Consolation of Philosophy'—
his theological writings; see
'Theological Tracts'—his style,
74, 76-80, 120, 121, 152 —a
medium for Greek philosophy
in the middle ages, 2, 244, 245
—his influence on medieval
literature, 232-234, 239 ; and see
Alfred, Chaucer, Notker, etc.—
the favourite author of the
middle ages, 160.

Boethius, A. M., father of the

above, 23, 24.
Boethius, African bishop, 5.
1 Boethius und seine Stellung zum

Christenthume.' See Hilde-

brand.
Bosizio, 10.

'Breviarium Chronicon.' See Ado.
Brunet, G., 203 n.
Brunetto Latino, 232, 233.

Bruno of Corvey, S, 109.
Buchon, 208, 209.

Cselestine, 141.
Cally, P., 98.

Cambridge University Library,

MS. in, 140.
Carlsruhe, library at, 11.
Casaubon, on Boethius's style, 78.
Cassiodorus, 'Institutioues' of, 11

—not the writer of 'Aneed.

Hold.,' 14—' Varise Epistola;' of,

41— on the accusers of Boethius,

42- 44, 51, 52—his character, 42,
51—his style, 41, 50, 77—in
early middle ages, 169.

Catholic Faith. I. On the Trinity,
110, 111, 131—formulated by
Augustine, 120, 128, 129.

II. On the nature and person
of Christ, 147, 150, 151.

'Celui qui bien bat les buissons,'
208-212—not by Charles d'Or-
leans, 208 - 210—Toulouse MS.
of, 210.

'Cena Trimalchionis,' 75.

Cethegus, 12,13.

Chalcedon, Council of, 153, 158.

Chance, Aristotle's definition of,
91—a fulfilment of the divine
order, 90.

Charles d'Orlc'ans, 208-210.

Charles the Bald, 255.

Charles the Great, 196, 242.

Charles V., 210.

Charles VI., 210.

Charles VII., 209.

Chaucer, Caxton's praise of, 214—
his first acquaintance with the
works of Boethius, 215 — his
translation of the 'Cons.,' 215,
217-229—its approximate date,
215, 217 — not an early work,
217, 226 — its interest for us,
217—no Latin scholar, 226 —
his method of translation, 217—
his mistranslations, 222-225—
his glosses, 218-221, compared
with Notker's, 218 — his ex-
periments in metre, 228, 229—
his trial of new words, 221, 222
—his prose and verse compared,
227, 228—and Boccaccio, 215, 216
—and Notker, 218—and French
translators, 202-206—his 'Troy-

lus and Cryseyde,' 215-217, 228

—his ' Former Age,' 228.
Christ, nature and person of. See

Catholic Faith, II.
Christianity, question of Boethius's,

see Boethius, III.—traces of in

the ' Cons.' real, 81, 87,102-104,

apparent, 101-103.
Xolpa of Plato, 84.
Cicero, 61, 84—in the early middle

ages, 169.
Clement the Irishman, 243.
Clovis the Frank, 28.
Coburger, 238.
Codex Augiensis, 11.
Coemption, 35 n.—Chaucer on,

219.

Communicatio idiomatum, 150.
Comte, 182.

Conception, false, 252.

'Consolation of Philosophy,' the,
I. Analysis of, 57-72—style of,
73, 74, 76-80—probable motive
of, 105-107—artificial character
of, 56, 106—not a confession of
faith, 56—a completed work, 7,
8, 73—comparative length of the
books in, 73—absence of Chris-
tian characteristics in, 53, 54—
its apparent indifference to
Christianity, 104, 105—Bruno of
Corvey on, 3—Gervaise on, 6—
John of Salisbury on, 4—Glar-
eanus on, 6—Hildebrand on,
9—Gibbon on, 161—reasons for
its popularity in the middle
ages, 86, 161, 162—traces of, in
'Beowulf,' 167-169.

II. Translations and imitations
of, by Alfred, 170-178—by Not-
ker, 190-197 —by Simun de
Fraisne, 198-200—by Jehan de
Meun, 201-206 —by Pierre de
Paris, 206, 207—by Jehan de
Cis, 212, 213—by Frere Renaut
de Louhans, 213, 214—by an-
onymous Provencal poet, 178-
189 ; and see ' Boece'—by anony-
mous French writers, 200-206,
208-212, 213—bv Chaucer, 214-
229—by John the Chaplain, 229-
231—by Alberto delta Piagen-
tina, 232, 233—by Fra Giovanni
da Foligno, 234 — by Messer
Grazia da Siena, 234—by Maxi-
mus Planudes, 235—by Fra An-
tonio Ginebreda, 236, 237—by
Peter of Kastl, 237, 238.

Constantinople, see of, at variance
with Rome, 156, 157.

'Corinthians, Epistle to the,' 99.

Count of the sacred largesses, office
of, 42, 46.

Cousin, V., 241, 246.

Creation, Christian theory of, 100.

Cyprian, 31 — Boethius on, 36—
Cassiodorus on, 42-44—the pro-
bable truth about, 45.

Da-monum sollertia, 68, 87.
Dante, 239, 257—quoted, 60, 200.
'Decline and Fall. See Gibbon.
'De Consolatione Philosophic.'

See 'Consolation of Philosophy.'
Decoratus, 50.

'De Fide,' tract attributed to
Boethius, 10, 138-141—possible
author of, 140.

'De Hebdomalibus.' See 'Quo-
modo substantia? bona? sint.'

De la Rue, on S. de Fraisne, 200.

Delisle, L., on J. de Meun's trans-
lation, 202—on 'Celui qui bien
bat les buissons,' 208-210.

Deltuf, 15.

'De Nuptiis Mercurii et Philo-
logise,' 75.

'De Persona,' Boethius's tract,
analysis of, 142-152—its motive,
142—style, 152—its date, 154.

'De Trinitate,' Boethius's tract,
analysis of, 110-117 — evidence
for, 2, 109, 124-126—objections
to, 117-124—its motive, 119—its
style, 121.

Dietrich of Bern, 22 n.

'Doctrina de Sapientia,' tract at-
tributed to Severinus of Cologne,
141.

Dualism, 84, 100.
Du Roure, 5, 15.

Ealred, 201.

Earle, J., quoted, 164 n.
'Ecclesiastes,' 102.
BipopfMioj, 88.
Eleatics, 246.
Empedocles, 84, 89 n.
"E^, 87.

Ennodius, 15, 50, 77.

Epic, Northern French, 189.
Epicurus, 39 n.
'BravSTM, 40, 218 n., 225.
Eric of Auxerre, 254.
Erigena, 255-257.
Eternity, 71, 89, 124-126.
Euclid, translated by Boethius, 26.
Eutyches. See Eutychianism.
Eutychianism, 142, 147-156.
Evil, Boethius's conception of, 64,
91,92—Plato's conception of, 91.
Ex nihilo nihil, 85, 91.

Fabricius, quoted, 141 n.

Fame, the narrow limits of, 61, 62.

Fate, Neoplatonic doctrine of, 87,

88—Stoic doctrine of, 88—and

Providence, 67-69, 88-90.
Faustus, pretorian prefect, 36 n.
Festus, guardian of Boethius, 24.
'Filostrato,' the, 215.
Foreknowledge and freewill, 70,

71, 81, 82, 96, 97—illustration

of, 71, 96.
Form, 112.

'Former Age,' Chaucer's, 228.

Fortune, 59-62—God's instrument
for man's education, 90.

Fra Antonio Ginebreda, translator
of the 'Cons.,' 236, 237.

Fra Giovanni da Foligno, trans-
lator of the 'Cons.,' 234.

Francheville, 7.

Freewill and predestination, 70,
71, 81, 82, 96, 97—illustration
of, 71, 96.

Frere Renaut de Louhans, trans-
lator of the 'Cons.,' 213, 214.

Frisi and the diptych of Monza, 140.

Furnivall, 214.

Gaudentius the informer, 36.

Gelasius, Pope, 153.

Genera, nature of, 246—Plato on,
247, 253—Aristotle on, 247, 248,
250, 251, 253, 254 —Porphyry
on, 248—Boethius on, 248-254.

Gerbert of Rheims, 245.

German translations of the 'Cons.'
237, 238.

Gervaise, on the ' Cons.,' 6.

Gibbon, 15, 161—on the parentage
of Odovacar, 16 — on Theodoric's
court, 23—on the characters of
Basilius and Opilio, 52.

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