The Annals of London: A Year-by-year Record of a Thousand Years of History

Capa
University of California Press, 2000 - 408 páginas
One of the world's greatest cities, the vast metropolis of twentieth-century London began in ad 43 when Aulius Plautius led the second invasion from Richborough to defeat the local army on the banks of the Thames. The victors then created a Roman settlement and established themselves on the river. They developed the city with a southern defense work (Southwark), and the settlement prospered as the preeminent trading base linking Britain to Europe and the Near East. The city's expansion through the invasions of the Anglo-Saxons and the Vikings serves as a background for the first of the almanac entries, 1065, which sees the consecration of Edward the Confessor's Abbey at Westminster, shortly before the king's own burial in his new church.
The first appearance and gradual evolution of roads, buildings, and landmarks is set in the context of the ebb and flow of history through the capital's streets and rivers: from the local (the 1665 outbreak of plague, where the healthy were incarcerated with the sick to avoid further infection, and the spread of the great fire that decimated much of the city the following year) to the politically significant (the execution of the king in 1649 outside Inigo Jones's banqueting house, whose building in 1619 is also described).
The sweep of this book is vast and its detail magnificent. Disasters, innovations, and everyday events relating to politics, society, pageantry, the arts, religion, and industry are revealed to display the wide spectrum of London life. Year by year, from 1065 to the present day, events that have shaped the London we know are brought vividly to life by John Richardson's informative text, which is supported by an extraordinary and eclectic collection of historical illustrations. One of the world's greatest cities, the vast metropolis of twentieth-century London began in ad 43 when Aulius Plautius led the second invasion from Richborough to defeat the local army on the banks of the Thames. The victors then created a Roman settlement and established themselves on the river. They developed the city with a southern defense work (Southwark), and the settlement prospered as the preeminent trading base linking Britain to Europe and the Near East. The city's expansion through the invasions of the Anglo-Saxons and the Vikings serves as a background for the first of the almanac entries, 1065, which sees the consecration of Edward the Confessor's Abbey at Westminster, shortly before the king's own burial in his new church.
The first appearance and gradual evolution of roads, buildings, and landmarks is set in the context of the ebb and flow of history through the capital's streets and rivers: from the local (the 1665 outbreak of plague, where the healthy were incarcerated with the sick to avoid further infection, and the spread of the great fire that decimated much of the city the following year) to the politically significant (the execution of the king in 1649 outside Inigo Jones's banqueting house, whose building in 1619 is also described).
The sweep of this book is vast and its detail magnificent. Disasters, innovations, and everyday events relating to politics, society, pageantry, the arts, religion, and industry are revealed to display the wide spectrum of London life. Year by year, from 1065 to the present day, events that have shaped the London we know are brought vividly to life by John Richardson's informative text, which is supported by an extraordinary and eclectic collection of historical illustrations.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Procura do Utilizador  - Polaris- - LibraryThing

Lavishly illustrated, this is a great book to pick up and browse randomly, or to search out any particular year. Full of unexpected and quirky nuggets from the past, and really well written. Ler crítica na íntegra

The annals of London: a year-by-year record of a thousand years of history

Procura do Utilizador  - Not Available - Book Verdict

While Samuel Johnson's famous remark that tiring of London means tiring of life is an exaggeration, this chronology provides ample evidence of the city's boundless fascination. A three-page pr cis ... Ler crítica na íntegra

Índice

Secção 1_
5
Secção 2_
61
Secção 3_
70
Secção 4_
74
Secção 5_
75
Secção 6_
95
Secção 7_
96
Secção 8_
98
Secção 16_
182
Secção 17_
204
Secção 18_
218
Secção 19_
236
Secção 20_
274
Secção 21_
275
Secção 22_
295
Secção 23_
308

Secção 9_
104
Secção 10_
108
Secção 11_
114
Secção 12_
137
Secção 13_
146
Secção 14_
147
Secção 15_
159
Secção 24_
310
Secção 25_
334
Secção 26_
353
Secção 27_
354
Secção 28_
355
Secção 29_
395
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Acerca do autor (2000)

John Richardson is the author of London and Its People (1995). He has written histories of Covent Garden, Camden Town, Hampstead, Islington, Highgate, Kentish Town, and Soho.

Informação bibliográfica