Old Wine in New Bottles; Or, Spare Hours of a Student in Paris

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J. M'Glashan, 1849 - 332 páginas
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Índice

XVIII
108
XIX
117
XXI
130
XXII
136
XXIV
146
XXV
152
XXVI
161
XL
276
XLI
283
XLII
289
XLV
310
XLVI
318
XLVII
324

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Palavras e frases frequentes

Passagens conhecidas

Página 103 - I found not Cassio's kisses on her lips : He that is robb'd, not wanting what is stolen, Let him not know it, and he's not robb'd at all.
Página 245 - Baulk'd are the courts, and contest is no more. Despairing quacks with curses fled the place, And vile attorneys, now a useless race.
Página 113 - Tis thou, thrice sweet and gracious goddess, addressing myself to LIBERTY, whom all in public or in private worship, whose taste is grateful, and ever will be so, till NATURE herself shall change no tint of words can spot thy snowy mantle...
Página v - The use of travelling is to regulate imagination by reality, and instead of thinking how things may be, to see them as they are.
Página 98 - ... of his woollen or silken thread to that part of the picture he is copying. The object of the process being to present as smooth and delicate a surface as possible, all cuttings and fastenings are performed at the back. Hence the necessity of his working on the wrong side.
Página 224 - Here the o'erloaded slave flings down his burden From his gall'd shoulders; and, when the stern tyrant, With all his guards and tools of power about him, Is meditating new unheard-of hardships, Mocks his short arm, and quick as thought escapes, Where tyrants vex not, and the weary rest.
Página 234 - Nor number, nor example with him wrought To swerve from truth, or change his constant mind Though single.
Página 45 - France, there is a market, whither young girls resort, and stand hour after hour, with their flowing hair, rich and glossy, deriving additional lustre from the contrast with their naked shoulders. This is the resort of the merchant barbers, some of whom come even from England. The merchants pass along among them, examine the color, texture, evenness, and other qualities of the beautiful fleece, haggle for a sou, and finally buy.
Página 53 - When a guinguette adds an orchestra and a ball-room to its other attractions, it is called a bastringue.

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