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temper, and killed rats and mice like winking! But about this time a young gentleman came up to her, and she said, 'Charles, here's a beautiful Skye, isn't it? He wants three pounds for it.' On which he asked the man how he had come by me? And he told the gentleman the same fibs he had told the lady. when he said I was only three years But old, the gentleman stooped down, opened my mouth, and looking at my teeth, said, laughing, Why, you scamp, he's ten or eleven years old, if he is a week. Come away, ma'am,'

and they left us.

He offered me to thought the price too high, and others a good many people, but some whispered that I might have been stolen; and several looked in my breed, but very old: so about seven mouth, and said I was of the true o'clock, much tired, and greatly cellar, and placed in my old quarters, disgusted, I was taken back to the when the first thing I did was, to drain every drop of water that was in my can soon after which my supper it, I fell asleep." was brought, and after hastily eating

TALK AMONG THE DOGS.

"I suppose you had a good deal of conversation with the other dogs, Tickler?"

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Yes, sir-a good deal, and some of them were very intelligent and

well bred."

"Were any of them communicative? Did they tell you their history, or adventures ?"

"Oh, yes, sir.'

"I should like to hear."

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Why no, sir; the real truth is, that so many of them talked to me, and told me what had happened, and where they belonged to, that it got all mixed into one in my mind, and I could never recollect what was said by any particular dog. But I knew some of them had been stolen as I was, others had been enticed away by other dogs, some by nice food, and others had run away of themselves, and then been caught up, and brought to the old gentleman's.

times to different parts of the town, but "I was taken out seven or eight never near our own neighbourhood, other no one would buy me; and I in this way, but for some reason or long walks, for I did not feel so strong began to get very tired with these as before. Also, I used to sleep a great deal more in my cellar than at first, and I felt less and less pleasure in collect one of them saying he belong talking to the other dogs: but I reed to a lady at whose house he had had heard you mention me with once seen you at dinner, and that he great respect."

Tickler-I daresay I spoke kindly "Respect is hardly the word, of you; but who was the lady?"

sighing; "it is all confusion; in fact, I cannot recollect, sir," said he, I used often to fall asleep while they were talking to me.

TICKLER'S RETURN.

"At length, one Saturday evening, the old gentleman came down into the cellar, and brought me up into the room behind the shop, and told Billy to wash the dye off my mouth (he had put it on every day that I went out), and soon afterwards the man came in that had so often tried to sell me.

"Well-think of this here brute's

being kept here a whole month, eating his head off, and giving us so much trouble to get rid on him, all for one poor suvrein!'

"I told you, from what I'd heard, the people meant it, old feller-it

knowed it was.' was all my eye about the £5-I

better-a suvrein isn't to be sneezed "Well the sooner he's off the here 'ard times-but in coorse, you'll at on a Saturday night, in these let Briggs take the dog to the gent's house they don't know him, and you'll stand a few doors off.'

"He's promised to do the job for half-a-crown, and the chance of anything else he can get from the people there so now I'm off.'

"This was, I am confident, the happiest moment that I had ever known up to that time; I felt new

life in me, indeed, sir, every step I went. The man called at two or three public-houses with me, to drink with his friends. At length another man came, and took me into a little room, where I recollect there were two cats, and also two youths. I was so overcome with joy, that I could hardly move towards them; and when they called me by my name, I felt quite confused. I saw one of them give a sovereign and a five-shilling piece to the man, while the other took me up under his arm, and carried me nearly all the way home. I felt weak and hungry, for I had had nothing to eat all day; and when I first got into this room again, that I had thought of and dreamed about so often, I believed, for a good while, that I was only dreaming once more, especially when I heard you all calling me by my name, so kindly and gently, and when you gave me those charming chicken-bones. O how nice they were! And the carpet so smooth and everything so nice and fresh, but who was Snap? Is he to stay suppose that well-picked mutton-chop bone under the sofa was his."

"Never fear, dear Tickler; your rival has marching orders. To-mor

row he goes."+ Tickler's eyes glittered with pleasure.

"Well, sir, home is home, for man and dog, and I hope to spend the rest of my days under your protection."

'Ay, my dear dog, and you shall always have Lynx's eyes upon you for the future: and Jiggins is discharged —whether it was his fault or his misfortune."

Poor Tickler had spoken his last, and resumed his nature-indicated by his springing out of his chair and barking with great vigour, as he always did when he heard the sound of mice scrambling in the wainscot because long experience had taught him that that everlasting mouse was invisible, and inaccessible. Then he suddenly bethought himself of his long-neglected supper, to which he directed his attention with the utmost energy. Having drunk plentifully of water, and rubbed his mouth well on the carpet, he jumped again on my wife's easy-chair, a dog, and nothing more, but a very sagacious and affectionate one; and turning himself round five or six times, as if desirous of circumventing himself,though for what precise purpose is to me a mystery, unless it were to settle himself into a perfectly comfortable position,-by-and-by he was asleep.

FINE CONCLUDING REFLECTIONS.

But many things that he had said made a deep impression on me, indicating, as they did, the existence of so many scenes and characters more than one comes into contact with. And, moreover, I began to reflect on the strangeness of a dog's being invested with human attributes, for a time, without forgetting his own; a point, then, however, at which my thoughts began to get into a splendid confusion. I tried to imagine a dog's nature, in like manner, superinduced upon, not absorbed into, mine. I dare say my thoughts were wonderfully sublime and profound, for with all my efforts and (inter nos) a modest

inclination to believe myself capable of anything, even I could not understand them. In that confounded condition I choose to leave them, a lustrous mass of nothing. And if any reader choose to say fine things, with a confident air, about Instinct and Reason, I answer finally, Pho! Pshaw! But surely that will furnish something for The Essence of Everything.

Heigh, ho! (I yawn, then I wind up my watch.) `Ah, Tickler, what a difference between a man and a dog! Tickler. Bow WOW WOW! Bow-wow!

* See the February Number, pp. 204, 208.

+ And he did so. The outer door was opened; he went out, and never returned.

temper, and killed rats and mice like winking! But about this time a young gentleman came up to her, and she said, 'Charles, here's a beautiful Skye, isn't it? He wants three pounds for it.' On which he asked the man how he had come by me? And he told the gentleman the same fibs he had told the lady. But when he said I was only three years old, the gentleman stooped down, opened my mouth, and looking at my teeth, said, laughing, Why, you scamp, he's ten or eleven years old, if he is a week. Come away, ma'am,'

and they left us. He offered me to a good many people, but some thought the price too high, and others whispered that I might have been stolen; and several looked in my mouth, and said I was of the true breed, but very old so about seven o'clock, much tired, and greatly disgusted, I was taken back to the cellar, and placed in my old quarters, when the first thing I did was, to drain every drop of water that was in my can soon after which my supper was brought, and after hastily eating it, I fell asleep."

TALK AMONG THE DOGS.

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Why no, sir; the real truth is, that so many of them talked to me, and told me what had happened, and where they belonged to, that it got all mixed into one in my mind, and I could never recollect what was said by any particular dog. But I knew some of them had been stolen as I was, others had been enticed away by other dogs, some by nice food, and others had run away of themselves, and then been caught up, and brought to the old gentleman's.

"I was taken out seven or eight times to different parts of the town, but never near our own neighbourhood, in this way, but for some reason or other no one would buy me; and I began to get very tired with these long walks, for I did not feel so strong as before. Also, I used to sleep a great deal more in my cellar than at first, and I felt less and less pleasure in talking to the other dogs: but I recollect one of them saying he belonged to a lady at whose house he had once seen you at dinner, and that he had heard you mention me with great respect."

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Respect is hardly the word, Tickler-I daresay I spoke kindly of you; but who was the lady?"

I cannot recollect, sir," said he, sighing; "it is all confusion; in fact, used often to fall asleep while they were talking to me.

TICKLER'S RETURN.

"At length, one Saturday evening, the old gentleman came down into the cellar, and brought me up into the room behind the shop, and told Billy to wash the dye off my mouth (he had put it on every day that I went out), and soon afterwards the man came in that had so often tried to sell me.

"Well-think of this here brute's being kept here a whole month, eating his head off, and giving us so much trouble to get rid on him, all for one poor suvrein !'

"I told you, from what I'd heard, the people meant it, old feller-it

was all my eye about the £5-I knowed it was.

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'Well-the sooner he's off the better-a suvrein isn't to be sneezed at on a Saturday night, in these here 'ard times--but in coorse, you'll let Briggs take the dog to the gent's house-they don't know him, and you'll stand a few doors off.'

"He's promised to do the job for half-a-crown, and the chance of anything else he can get from the people there so now I'm off.'

"This was, I am confident, the happiest moment that I had 'ever known up to that time; I felt new

life in me, indeed, sir, every step I went. The man called at two or three public-houses with me, to drink with his friends. At length another man came, and took me into a little room, where I recollect there were two cats, and also two youths. I was so overcome with joy, that I could hardly move towards them; and when they called me by my name, I felt quite confused. I saw one of them give a sovereign and a five-shilling piece to the man, while the other took me up under his arm, and carried me nearly all the way home. I felt weak and hungry, för I had had nothing to eat all day; and when I first got into this room again, that I had thought of and dreamed about so often, I believed, for a good while, that I was only dreaming once more, especially when I heard you all calling me by my name, so kindly and gently, and when you gave me those charming chicken-bones. O how nice they were! And the carpet so smooth and everything so nice and fresh, but who was Snap * Is he to stay here? I suppose that well-picked mutton-chop bone under the sofa was

his."

"Never fear, dear Tickler; your rival has marching orders. To-mor

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because long experts had to him that that everlasting invisible, and suddenly bethod looptagested spOL, V directed tis attented with the most energy. Having truck por fully of water, and rettet de toata well on the carpet, he jumped agai on my wide's carpemain, a se mi nothing more, but a very saculous and affectionate cor: abi turning himself rousive or six times 200 desirous of reverting though for what precise perpose ja to

himself into a perfenly medicine position,-by-anu'y he was wing

me a mystery, unless it were to write

FINE CONCLUDING REFLECTIONS.

But many things that he had said made a deep impression on me, indicating, as they did, the existence of so many scenes and characters more than one comes into contact with. And, moreover, I began to reflect on the strangeness of a dog's being invested with human attributes, for a time, without forgetting his own; a point, then, however, at which my thoughts began to get into a splendid confusion. I tried to imagine a dog's nature, in like manner, superinduced upon, not absorbed into, mine. I dare say my thoughts were wonderfully sublime and profound, for with all my efforts and (inter nos) a modest

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inclination to believe Irweld mapabue of anything, even I could not tha stand them.

condition I choose to leave LAFIL In that confirm and a lustrous mass of nothing Abiff with a confident air, about Ing any reader choose to say the thin and Reason, I answer finally, P50! something for The Essence of EveryPshaw But surely that will furnich thing.

up my watch. Ah, Tickler, what a Heigh, ho-1 yawn, then I wind difference between a man and a dog! Tickler. Bow WOW WOW Bow-wow!

See the February Number, pp. 204, 208.

And he did so. The outer door was opened; he went out, and never returned.

AYTOUN'S BOTHWELL.

It is well known to all intelligent persons in these realms that Maga edits herself. Floods of splendid talent, of middling ability, and, we are sorry to add, of lamentable nonsense, pour incessantly towards 45 George Street, Edinburgh, where the tributary currents unite and disappear behind the shrine of the divinity, like the rill that murmured by the oracle of Dodona. By some singular and inscrutable refining process, never perhaps to be revealed to humanity, all muddy particles and gross impurities are separated in that great unseen, unerring alembic; and with the first of each month comes forth the limpid, sparkling, and inspiriting result, which has for so many years unfailingly excited the world's admiration and applause.

This miracle, though of regular monthly recurrence, is so little understood by the blind multitude, that, notwithstanding frequent disclaimers, a vast number of the public, and of would-be contributors, persist in ascribing to Professor Aytoun* the editorship of the fresh, fragrant, blooming, and perennial Magazine. This mistake, however honourable to the Professor in its origin, is extremely troublesome to him in its results. The expense he is put to for the postage of the dreary weary packets of those unprincipled idiots who neglect to prepay their offences against grammar, sense, and propriety, would alone be a severe tax on any moderate income, and forms of itself a serious and extremely appreciable drawback on the ill-concealed but very pardonable exultation which the glorious imputation excites in the Professor. It is in vain that he endeavours to evade an infliction, compared with which the income-tax is a mild and beneficent dispensation. At one time he laboured under the delusion that he

could tell a contribution by the handwriting or external appearance; but, after declining to receive, at different times, several sheets of impassioned admiration from a woman of rank, an important brief from a rich client, and the title-deeds of an estate, which a discriminating old lady, whose last moments had been cheered by the Lays of the Scottish Cavaliers, had bequeathed to him, in token of her gratitude, with many others of less consequence, he wisely gave up the attempt, and now opens these frequent and liberal communications with feelings only partially appeased by thrusting the papers into the fire, deeper than did ever poker sound, the instant he discovers their nature.

This is bad enough; but another villanous nuisance is the constant receipt of abuse, complaint, and remonstrance, from those unhappy persons whose literary misdeeds have exposed them to the just punishment with which Maga occasionally regrets to find herself compelled to visit aggravated offences. Tom Noddy requests to be informed what Professor Aytoun means by permitting reflections on his (Tom's) respected grandfather's celebrated work to be published a work which, he begs leave to tell the Professor, in all calmness and courtesy, will be read and admired long after the Ballads of Bon Gaultier and the "Burial March of Dundee" have been smothered beneath the kindred rubbish of ages. Mr Mormon, whose style is compounded of Monk Lewis and Eugene Sue, sneeringly conveys his regret at the antiquated, and, he had hoped, exploded prejudices, which appear to have prompted the remarks of Maga on his lucubrations. Rosa Matilda (who stands in the relation of soul's wife to the aforesaid Mr Mormon, he being previously married in the flesh),

Bothwell: a Poem. In Six Parts. By W. EDMONDSTOUNE AYTOUN, D.C.L., Author of "Lays of the Scottish Cavaliers," &c.

Our pleasant contributor here alludes to a prevailing popular delusion that Professor Aytoun is Editor of the Magazine.

A much-esteemed contributor he has long been-and long may he be so-but he is not, and never was in any degree, Editor.-Ed. B. M.

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