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THE

BRITISH PULPIT;

A COLLECTION OP

THREE HUNDRED AND FIFTY ORIGINAL

SERMONS,

THE MOST EMINENT DIVINES

OF THE PRESENT DAY.

IN SIX VOLUMES.

VOL. III.

LONDON:

PUBLISHED BY G. WIGHTMAN, 24, PATERNOSTER ROW;

AND

i. NISBET, 21, BERNERS' STREET.

H. KNIGHT, PRINTER, ANOFT. COURT, SKINNER STREET.

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The Proprietors of the British Pulpit, after an interval of six months, present themselves again at the bar of the public with a Third Volume of original and cotemporary Sermons; and they do it is ;t« well-grounded hope and confidence that what they now oiler will be found, upon examination, not only to maintain the respectable character which the two former Volumes had merited, but also to advance its reputation in the religious world, and procure it additional friends and patronage.

In the Preface to the Second Volume, it may be recollected, that soir.t suggestions were offered on the importance of Public Preaching, and also on the style of Sermonizing; with an intimation that, should the hints then tendered meet with a favourable acceptance, the subject might be resumed on a future occasion, and discussed in a more ample manner; and to this object we now address ourselves.

The ministration of the Divine Word by Public Preaching, aims at nothing less than the moral regeneration of a lost and fallen world; and it was on contemplating this grand end that an Apostle was led to exclaim, "Who is sufficient for these things V It is by what men are pleased to call "the foolishness of preaching," that God hath chosen to save thetn that believe. He hath, in his infinite wisdom, been pleased to employ not angels, but men, in the work of regenerating the world. Men have written, printed, and published the Gospel for nearly two thousand years. They have perpetuated it from generation to generation. They have translated it from language to language, and carried it from country to country. They have preached it in word and in deed, and thus it has come down to our days.

In offering a few observations on the present stySe jf preacmng in this country, we begin with that class which may not improperly be designated the declaimers; by which is intended, not those only who restrict themselves to eulogize virtue and reprobate vice, but that large and respectable class who address themselves to the passions, to the hopes and fears of

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