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assumed at 300 a section, trapezoidal in figure, would contain 275 square feet. The contents of the dam would be about 26,000 cubic yards. The stone for this work can be conveniently obtained from the quarries and boulders a short distance above the projected work, at and near the Little Falls, and transported from there on barges. An estimate for building the dam is herewith submitted.

Besides the very great advantages which would accrue to Washington and Georgetown by the contemplated improvements in a business and commercial point of view, other most beneficial results will be derived from their execution. The low marshy flats which now line the river front of the city, adding so much to the unhealthy condition of the atmosphere, and presenting so unsightly an appearance, would be reclaimed, and in a short time, it is to be hoped, add greatly to the beauty of the public grounds in that section. Again, by opening a cut for the Tiber to pass into the deep water of the new channel, the sewerage of the city, a subject which should receive the most careful and studied attention on the

part of its inhabitants, would be carried off by the strong currents of the river, instead of spreading over the flats and generating pestilential vapors with which to infect the whole community. These great advantages will certainly deserve the consideration of the reflecting citizen, and compensate for the comparatively small pecuniary expense of the undertaking.

A statement setting forth the amount of tonnage arriving at and departing from both Washington and Georgetown during the last year 1867 is appended.

The following is a list of maps and plans which accompany this report:
1. Map of Potomac river, published in 1792.
2. Map of Potomac river, surveyed in 1857, by Captain Woodruff.
3. Map of Potomac river, surveyed in 1862, by Captain Patterson,
4. Map of Potomac river, surveyed in 1867, by Mr. Fendall.

5. Plan showing the alterations in the channel of the Potomac river, ascertained by surveys in 1792, 1857, 1862, and 1867.

6. Hydrographical map of the Potomac river above the Long bridge, showing the proposed channel and dam for connecting deep water at Georgetown with deep water at the Washington wharves; channel 100 feet wide and 12 feet deep. Also, a plan for connecting the 12-feet water curves in the Virginia channel. Hydrography from soundings made in 1867, and reduced to mean low water. I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

N. MICHLER, Major of Engineers, Brevet Brig. Gen. U. S. A. Brevet Major General A. A. HUMPHREYS, Chief of Engineers,

Headquarters Corps of Engineers, Washington, D. C.

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Total....

10, 191

N. MICHLER, Major of Engineers, Bot. Brig. Gen. U. S. A.

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CUSTOM HOUSE,

Georgetown, D. C., May 16, 1868. Sir: The customs district of Georgetown comprises all of the District of Columbia and the Maryland side of the Potomac river for 30 miles below this, and to the head-waters of the Potomac on the Maryland side.

The tonnage of vessels belonging to this district is 22,455786 tons.

The number of vessels entered for the past year, 373; number of vessels cleared for the same time, 205.

You cannot judge of the amount of business done in this district from the number of vessels entered and cleared, for vessels in the coasting trade are not required to enter or clear at the custom-house unless they have foreign goods or distilled spirits on board.

I suppose at least 20 vessels arrive here which do not enter or clear, for each one that has to do so. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAMES A. MAGRUDER, Collector. General N. MICHLER.

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