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Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1856, by

DIX & EDWARDS, :: I the Clerk's Office of the District Court for the Southern District of New York

MILLER & HOLMAN, Printers and Stereotypers, N. Y.

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A CHRISTMAS CAROL ......

The Ring ......

124

A LEGEND OF ELSINORE-A BALLAD 64 Tue ROMANCE OF CRIMEAN HISTORY. 144

ASPIRATION ......... ...........

143 THE PHILOSOPHY OF PUXXING....... 154

A PLEA FOR QUINCES AND QUINCE THE RANGER—A BALLAD...

174

TREES ........

THE HAUNTED KING AND THE LOADED

A WORD FOR MEN's Riguts ........

Dice .....

177

ABC Hamood's MULE, AND THE CEDARS THE MALAKOFF MARSEILLAISE... 313

OF LEBANON........

264 THE GENTLEMAN'S SHAWL ...

301

ABOUT PEAR-TREES ....

390 TO THE Rev. MR. - LINES com-

A TALK ABOUT POPULAR Songs ...

POSED IN SERMON TIME ....... 346

APRIL ........

THE SKY IS A DRINKING CUP ....... 360

A Child's Wish ......

524 THE RAIN ...

A VISIT TO MY GRANDPARENTS...... 525 The OCEAN DEPTHS--A DIVER'S TALE 386

AN AMERICAN'S ADVENTURE IN Pegu 561 THE SCULPTOR OF ALBANY....... 394

ANNIE AT THE CORNER : THE HISTORY THE REAL QUESTION ........

428

OF A HEART ........

· 629

THE KANE RELIEF EXPEDITION ...... 449

-CALHOUN ON GOVERNMENT .........

THE APPLE-TREE TABLE ; OR, ORIGINAL

CYCLOPÆDIA OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 170 SPIRITUAL MANIFESTATIONS........ 465

CHESTER ......

254 THE IcoxOCLAST .................

CIRCE-A STORY OF PARIS IN THE THE SPIRITS IN 1692, AND WHAT THEY

EIGHTEENTH CENTURY.

284 DID AT SALEM......

505

CHICAGO IN 1856 ....

606 THE DEMON OF MUSIC

DEAD LEAVES ......

574 THE COUNTERFEIT Coin ....

High LIFE-AT TE VORTI POLE... 138 THE RISE OF THE DUTCÁ REPUBLIC.. 592

How I COURTED LULU ..

317 WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE AND HIS PLAYS
HAVE ANIMALS Souls? ..

361 --AY ISQUIRY CONCERNING THEY.. 1.
HIGH LIFE--ON THE MOUNTAINS... 584 Wup-Poor-WILL ..
"I AND MY CHIMNEY ....

269 WASHINGTON AT BOSTON-SIXTY-SIX
KINGSLEY'S POEMS.................
532 YEARS AGO ......

113
Low LIFE-IN THE PAMPAS ........ 55 What THE VOICE SAID TO THE STC-
LIVING IN THE COUNTRY....... 166, 295

DE T ........................... 393

393
LEWES'S LIFE OF GOETHE .......... 192 Young Love.........

.................. 575
LIFE AND CHARACTER OF St. Augus.
TINE.....

......... 225

EDITORIAL Notes, 101, 214, 326, 435, 546,
MR. PREscort's PHILIP THE SECOND. 50

659.
MY WIFE AND I ..................

169

American Literature and Reprints. -Pliny
MACAULAY'S HISTORY OF ENGLAND... 255 Miles's Postal Reform-Wilson's Mexico
MY MISSION....................... 294 and her Religion - The Moral and Intel-
NATHAN HALE—THE MARTYR SPY OF

lectual Diversity of Races, by Gobineau,

THE REVOLUTION................. 476

Hortz, and Dr. Xott-Dr. Hare's Investiga.

NAPOLEON BONAPARTE AS A FAMILY

tion of Spirit Manifestations Lewes's Life

of Goethe--Dr. Griswold's Pets and Poetry

Max ....................... 511, 614

of America-Reed's Lectures on English His.

OWLCOPSE-A STORY OF REFORM AND

tory-Mrs. Sarah J. Hale's Library of Stand-
REFORMERS.............. 80, 125, 240 ard Letters—Talfourd's Life and Works of
ON THE PIER ......

... 283

Charles Lamb-Harper's Classical Library
OUR SEA COAST DEFENSE AND FOR-

--Watson's Xenophon's Anabasis and Me
TIFICATION SYSTEM.............

morabilia, and Edwards's Cicero-Caste, a
ON A PICTURE OF BEATRICE IN PARA-

Story of Republican Equality - Lily--Wood's
DISE..........................

464

Modern Pilgrims--Widow Bedott Papers-
Our RELATIONS WITH ENGLAND .....

Mrs. Wirt's Flora's Dictionary-De Quincy's

OUR LIGHT-HOCSE ESTABLISHMENT.... 644

Klosterheim-Sterling's Onyx Ring-Du-

ganne's Poetical Works--Bayard Taylor's

PROGRESS OF RELIGIOUS IDEAS ...... 76

Poems of Home and Travel -A Batch of
Parsox FIELD'S EXPERIENCE ........ 420

Children's Books--Cranch's Last of the Hug.
· RELIGIOCS FREEDOM IN AMERICA .... 337 germuggers-The Mysterious Story-Book
ROBERT BROWNING..

372 Out of Debt, out of Danger-Bears of Au.
Ruskin's WRITINGS ...

490 gustusburg.
SCAMPAVIAS .......... 73, 382, 483, 600 Publishers and Critics-Allibone's Critical
SOXNET ...............

137 Dictionary of English Literature-Read's
SNIP-SNAP........

House by the Sea-Songs and Ballads of

House by
..................... 304
SOME ORIENTAL ACQUAINTANCE...... 415

the American Revolution-Walter Savage
SCENES IN THE WESTERN DISTRICT ..

Landor's Writings-Cousin Veronica, by
The Rain....

Miss Wormley-Ravelings from the Web
.................

of Life--Blind Girl of Wittenburg--Amy
The GHOST-A CHRISTMAS STORY...

Lee-Lily Hudson-Glances and Glimpses
THE VIRGINIA SPRINGS...

-L fe of St. Bernard-Olmsted's Seaboard
THE FALCON ......

Slave States-Miss Murray's America-

90941

Squier's Central America-Dr. Kane's New
Book-Wells's Year Book of Agriculture
Willis's Church Music--The Criterion-
The Crayon—The Home Journal-Frank
Leslie's Illustrated Paper-Rufini's Dr. An-

tonio.
Novels-Edith; or, The Quaker's Daughter-

Lanmere - Wolfsden - Home - The New
Purchase-Dreams and Realities of a Pastor
and Teacher-Early Greek Romances
Napoleon's Confidential Letters-Life of
Jeffrey, by Lord Cockburn-The Attaché
in Spain-The Day Star-Life of Washing-
ton, by Washington Irving--Grace Green-

wood's New Volume of Tales-Woman's

Faith - Creole Orphans--Lost Hunter-

Natty, & Spirit-Zoe Sumner's Speeches.

Travels.-Ewbank's Sketches of Brazil -
Jarvey's Parisian Sights and French Princi-
ples-The Kansas of Mr. Green-Mrs. Ferris'
Mormons at Ilome. Philosophy.-Schweg.
ler's History of Philosophy-Mr. Tappan's
Elements of Logic. Science.--Elements-
Analytical Mechanics, and the Spherical
Astronomy-Annual of Scientific Discovery
-Gosse on the Ocean, Miscellaneous.
Mackie's Life of Schamyl--Fourth Volume
of Poe's Works—Maginn's Shakespearian
Papers – Dr. Raphall's Jews - Young's
American Statesmen-Barnard's Journal of

Education.

A Perceptible falling off of “Sensation Books"

--What is Likely to take their Place? Our

Young Writers--- A few Words as Hints

Appleton's Cyclopædia of Biography--Liter-

ary Criticism, and other Papers, by the late

Horace Binney Wallace, Dr. Gilman's Con.

tributions to Literature-.At Home and

Abroad, by Margaret Fuller-Liberty and

Slavery, by Professor Bledsoe-List's Na-

tional System of Political Economy-Ida

Pfeiffer's Second Journey-The Madeira of
Mr. March-Lieut. Brewerton's Kansas--
Bohn's Libraries--Sinyth's Lectures on the
French Revolution-Beaumont and Fletch-
er-Defoe's Works-Memoirs of Philip de
Comines--Motley's Dutch Republic--Harp-

er's Classical Library.

European Literature, England.-Burton's

Pilgrimage to El Medineh- Help's Spanish

Conquest of America-Rogers’s Table Talk.

442.

Art Matters.--The End of the Opera-What

Mr. Paine did for Us-The “Italians" at

Paris and at New York--Fiorentini--Pozzi -

Carrion--Evenardi-Angelini--Borghi Ma-

mo-Zucchini-Mme. Lagrange Miss Hen.

slerMlle. Nantier Didiée--Salviani - Brig.

noli--Rovere-Amodio-Rio Janerio robbing

New York-The Ravels–Pantomimes and

Theatricals---- False Pretenses" and our

Best Society - Juvenile Comedians, what

they should do, and what they should not

Christmas Gifts-—- Books of Beauty," and

Beautiful Books-Illustrated Poems--Ten-

nyson-Keats's Eve of St. Agnes--Birket

Foster's “ Allegro," and “Penscroso"--Mr.

Darley's “ Margaret''-A word for Hiawa-
tha-Pictures : Scott and his Contemporaries

-Landseer's "Shepherd's Prayer." . 110

The Opera.-Mr. Paine---Banks and Richard-

son is. Meyerbeer and Rossini-Mr. Paine

in Boston-What Boston did for Mr. Hac-

kett-Of Lagrange, Hensler, Salviani, and

Didiée_Arditi's New Opera, The Gipsy-

Jenny Lind once more in America-Now in
London-Madame La Marquise de Candia
-Drury Lane- Madame Alboni-A New
Opera Buffa--Fiorini-Concerts with Us--
The Philharmonic-Mr. Gottschalk--Rachel
leaving Havana-King Charming and the
Blue Bird-Pocahontas-A New Piece at
the Français-Jaconde--The Varieties--Le
Royaume des Calembours-London, and
the Cloth of Gold-The Theatres--Cold
Terms-Mr. Brougham--Mr. M. Vickar-
Mrs. Bennett--Barrow's Comedies-- A Bur-
lesque on Don Quixote-Blondel-A Child's
Theatre-The French Gymnase des Enfants

-Boston Importation of Sculpture by the

Ton-A Grand Museum of Antiquity at

New York. . . . . . . . . . . 222

The World of New York.-March, a Blusterer
and a Nuisance--A Herald of Spring--The
Cold and the Ills it brings--The Charms of
Winter-A Christmas Dinner-Christmas
Around the Register-A Hole in the Floor
-Lord Palmerston's Definition of Dirt--
Snow in New York and Snow in the Country
-The Stroets, their Appearance-Snow-clad
Roofs-Two Weary Months---Welcome is
March, Harbinger of Spring-Our Opera
House-Madarne Lagrange-Philadelphia
and Boston--Miss Hensler-Brignoli--Ro-
vere and Didiée-Arditi's New Opera-.
Rossini and Meyerbeer-Our Philharmonic

Concerts---Classical Berlin--Old Print of

Albert Dürer's - Mr. Bristow-Gottschalk

-The Varieties - Wallack's--Burton's

The Broadway--Miss Keene--Mr. Lenton

-Duke Humphrey's Dinner-She Stoops

to Conquer-Mr. Walcot-An American

Comedy- Malle. Rachel in America-Pri-

vate Theatricals- Good Pictures in America

---Our Sculptors--Engravings after Cole's

Voyage of Life, by James Smillie. : 331

The Past Winter-Our Highways-Broadway

like the Boulevards, Paris" Was the
Fact"--Our Grandmothers—A New Eng.
land Legend-Winter's Tale-Burton, Miss
Laura Keene, and Wallack-Mr. Walcot-
Knights of the Round Table-Heir-at-Law
-Poor Plays and Poor Actors-Their Fault

- What is Needed--Craving for Amuse-

ment-The Academy-Astor Place-Clin-

ton Hall-Mr Curtis's Lectures-Cordial

Criticisms --- Crawford's Beethoven “Inau.

guration" in the Music Hall of Boston. 445

A Welcome to May-The Ancient Holiday--

Rustic May--May in the City-May-day-

May in the Country and on Broadway-

Winter Gone-The Ball Room-Lord Mel.

bourne–The “Ball for the Nurses'-Our

Opera House-Signor Arditi." The Spy"

-Brignoli--Hensler-Lagrange--Mr. Paine

-Muretzek-The Ravels-Qur Theatre-

The Lecturers-Miss Keene- Mr. Wallack

-Miss Louisa Howard- Mr. Burton That

Blessed Baby-The “Imperial Prince" of

the French-A Layette-The Dramatic

Fund Dinner-Judge Daly-The Academy

of Design. . . . . . . . . . . 553

Summer at last, and a Pleasant City--The
practice of “ Emptying" the Town- A few
Years ago, and those who then“ went into

the Country"-A Change-And is it for

Health?- Monotony is the Mother of all

Manner of Mischiefs--The true Mode of

Summer Enjoyment- To the Few already

Wise- June has Come, etc..... 659

Contents. $.tr' ('retral America-Dr. Kane Vow Iris Year Book of Agriculare

Jenny Lind once more in America-Vie; * Church MuseThe Criterion

Landon-Madame La Marquise de ce The Cratos-The llome Journal-- Frank

-Drury Lane- Madame Alboni-a la Les liustrated Paper-Rutiui Dr. An.

Opera Buffa--Fiorini-Concerts with Cr

The Philharmonic-Mr. Gottschalk-Ram amps-Edith: or, The Quaker's Daughter

leaving Havana-King Charming a

Blue Bird-Pocahontas-- A New Pieces Almere - Wojsden - Home - The New the Français-Jaconde The Varieter's 'ha fet Dreamna and Roalities of a Pastor

Royaume des Calembours--Londen, o li lealer--Early Greek Romance

the Cloth of Gold-The Theatres-. **. * (orbidential Latter-Lte of Terms-Mr. Brougham--Mr. M. Vietor dry. by Card (waburu-The Attaché

Mrs. Bennett-Barrow's Comedier -a Be masin - The Day ser-Life of Washing lesque on Don Quixote--BloudeFACE! by Webinton Irving-race (reen

Theatre-The French Gymnase des Erica mis New Tame of Tales-Womans - Boston Importation of sculpture by de 1.'.-(reve Orbans--Lost Hunter-

Ton- A Grand Museum of Antiquas
"**, art-
Zumner's Speeches.

New York.
i-Ewbank • Sketches of Brazil The World of New York.-March, a Bluser
*** Parisian datis and French Princi. and a Nuisance- A Herald of Spring Tu

-I Karras of Mr Green-Mr Ferris' Cold and the Ills it bring -- The Charter
** alioue. Parlaserphy. --Schweza Winter-A Christmas Dinner-Chrisma
Il s'dury of Philosophy -- Mr. Tappan's Around the Register - A Hole in the the
Of Large Siunc.-Elemente

--Lord Palmerston's Definition of Dita
*** Mechanica, and the Spherical Snow in New York and Snow in the County
is rhy-Annual of Surut fic Discovery -The Streets, their Appearance-Snorth
- the Okan /, «ritaneus. — Roots-Two Weary Montbs-Welcome a
1. Le of stamyl-Fourth Volume March, Harbinger of Spring-Our Ofert
* . WorkMann s Shakeseanan House-Madame Lagrango-Philadelica

- Dr. Raphanis Jens - Evangs and Boston-- Miss Hensler-Brignoli-B
u Yatesiden-Barnard's Jourual of vere and Didiée-Arditi's New Opt"

Rossini and Meyerbeer --Our Philharmonie
Concert - Classical Berlin--Old Print of
Albert Durer's - Mr. Bristow-Gottschalk

The Varieties -- Wallack's-Burton's
The Broadway--Miss Keene--Mr. Lentoa
-Duke Humphrey's Dinner-She Stoops
to Conquer-Mr. Walcot-An Americas
Comedy Malle. Rachel in America-Pri
vate Theatricals, Good Pictures in America
Our Sculptors-Engravings after Colet

Voyage of Life, by James Smillie.
The Past Winter-Our Highways-Broadway

like the Boulevards, Paris--" Was the
Fact"--Our Grandmothers-A New Enz
laud Legend-Winter's Tale-Burton, Min

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*** 11 off of "Senaation Buoky" 9. Ikey to take their Ploe? Our : Wa-A few Wonde as Hirt.

(yclopa dia of Braphy- Liter ! In, and other Papers, by the late Bitwy Waliace-Dr Gilman's Con on to Laterature- At llome and by Margaret Fuller Liberty and by Proteskor Biedeve-List's la **'s mn of Political Economy bla Second Journey--The Madeira of

by Lieut. Brewerton's Kansuribraries-smyth • Lectures on the sivuution-Beaumont and Fletch.

* Works-Memoirs of Philip de 26ey s Dutch Republic-Harp

Laura Ketne, and Wallack-Mr. Walcotiral Library.

Knights of the Round Table-Heir-at-Law

-Poor Plays and Poor Actors--Their Faali Puteratura England. -Burton's -What is Needed -Craving for Amuse I to El Medineh Dep's Spaninh ment-The Academy-Astor Place-Cliu America-Rogers 's Table Talk. ton llall-Mr Curtis's Lectures-Cordial

('riticieme - Crawford's Beethoven "Inau The End of the Opera - What

guration" in the Music Hall of Boston. 445 di for l'e-The Italians at A Welcome to May-The Ancient Holiday

New York Fiorentini- Pozzi - Rustic Hay--Máy in the City---May-dayrepanti-Ingelini--Borglii Ma May in the Country and on Broadway"; - Mine. Lagrange-Miss Hen. Winter Gone~The Ball Room-Lord Meluter Didier-Salviani - Brig. bourneThe “ Ball for the Nurses"-Our

Ano Rio Javerio robbing Opera HouseSignor Arditi-" The Spy" Ile Ravels Pantomimes and

-Brignoli-Hensler-Lagrange-Mr. Paine ** Falao Pretenses" and our Maretzek-The Ravels -- Our Theatres-- Juvenile Comedians, what The Lecturers-Miss Koene--Mr. Wallack w and what they should not - Miss Luisa Howard- Mr. Burton -That

Books of Beauty," and Blessed Baby--The "Imperial Prince" of

Ilustrated Poems --Ten the Freuch--A Layette The Dramatic * Eve of St. Agner-Birket Fund Dinner-Judge DalyThe Academy

553 of Design. me,' and Penseroso"-Mr. intA word for Hiawa

Suminer at last, and a Pleasant City-The vitt And his Contemporaries

practice of Emptying" the Town-A few Stepherd s Prayer."'. 110

Years ago, and those who then “went into

the Country”-A Chango-And is it for Paine-Back and Richard

Health 1-Monotony is the Mother of all
Manner of Mischiets-The true Mode of
Summer Eujoyment- To the Few already

Wise-June has Come, etc.
New Opera, The Gijs-

vr and Rimi- Mr. Paine *** Bumton did for Mr. Hac. lige, liensler, salviani, and

659

PUTNAM'S MONTHLY.

2 Magazine of Literature, Science, and Art

VOL. VII. -JAN., 1856.—NO, XXXVII.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE AND HIS PLAYS;

AN INQUIRY CONCERNING THEM.

HD For the literary miracles of anti

COW can we undertake to account tic characters, which the learned P

cian and Egyptian had brought in quity, while this great myth of the to the singing Greek of the H modern ages still lies at our own door, Ages, began, in the new modifica unquestioned ?

of national life which the later ac This vast, magical, unexplained phe tures of foreign elements createnomenon which our own times have pro length to be put to their true uses, duced under our own eyes, appears to song of the nation, even in its 1 be, indeed, the only thing which our form, was already old on the lips o modern rationalism is not to be per learned, and its origin a tradition. mitted to meddle with. For, here the the history of that wonderful indicritics themselves still veil their faces, ality,wherein the inspirations of so na filling the air with mystic utterances ages were at last united-the circ which seem to say, that to this shrine at stance, the vicissitude, the poetic least, for the footstep of the common rea that had framed that dazzling mirrc son and the common sense,

there is yet no old time, and wrought in it those de admittance. But how can they instruct of clearness—all had gone before th us to take off here the sandals which of writing and memories had foun they themselves have taught us to wear way into Greece, or even the facult into the inmost sekos of the most ancient perceiving the actual had begun to sanctities?

developed there. THE SHAKESPEARE DRAMA-its im And yet are the scholars of our port, its limitations, its object and content to leave this matter here, w sources, its beginning and end for the

they find it! With these poetic modern critic, that is surely now the mains in their hands, the monument question.

a genius whose date is ante-histori What, indeed, should we know of the are they content to know of their or origin of the Homeric poems? Twenty only what Alexander and Plato co five hundred years ago, when those mys know, what Solon and Pisistratus v

In commencing the publication of these bold, original, and most ingenious and interes speculations upon the real authorship of Shakespeare's plays, it is proper for the Edito Putnam's Monthly, in disclaiming all responsibility for their startling view of the question say that they are the result of long and conscientious investigation on the part of the lear and eloquent scholar, their author; and that the Editor has reason to hope that they wil continued through some future numbers of the Magazine.

VOL. VII.1

fain to content themselves with, what ics, when the present discussions in rethe Homerids themselves received of gard to them commenced, not so much, him as their ancestral patron !

-not a hundredth part so much, as we No: with these works in their hands now know of Pharaoh's, who reigned in to-day, reasoning from them alone, the valley of the Nile, ages before the with no collateral aids, with scarce an invasion of the Hyksos. extant monument of the age from which But with these products of the nathey come to us, they are not afraid to tional life in our hands, with all the cofly in the face of all antiquity with their temporary light on their implied condiconclusions.

tions which such an age as that of Have they not settled among them, Elizabeth can furnish, are we going to already, the old dispute of the contend be able to sit still much longer, in a peing cities, the old dispute of the con- riod of historical inquiry and criticism tending ages, too, for the honor of this like this, under the gross impossibilities poet's birth? Do they not take him to which the still accepted theory on this pieces before our eyes, this venerable subject involves ? Homer; and tell us how many old for The age which has put back old gotten poets' ashes went to his forma Homer's eyes, safe, in his head again, tion, and trace in him the mosaic seams after he had gone without them well which eluded the scrutiny of the age nigh three thousand years; the age of Pericles? Even Mr. Grote will tell which has found, and labeled, and sent us now, just where the Iliad “cuts to the museum, the skull in which the me” the fiery Achilles "cranking in ;" pyramid of Cheops was designed, and and what could hinder the learned the lions which "the mighty hunter beSchlegel, years ago, from setting his fore the Lord" ordered for his new chair in the midst of the Delian choirs, palace on the Tigris some millenniums confronting the confounded children of earlier; the age in which we have abIon with his definitions of the term jured our faith in Romulus and Remus, Homeros, and demonstrating, from the is surely one in which we may be perLeipsic Iliad in his hand that the poet's mitted to ask this question. cotemporaries had, in fact, named him Shall this crowning literary product Homer the seer, not Homer the Blind of that great epoch, wherein these new One ?

ages have their beginning, vividly arThe criticism of our age found this rayed in its choicest refinements, flashwhole question where the art of writing ing everywhere on the surface with its found it, two thousand five hundred costliest wit, crowded everywhere with years ago; but, because the Ionian cities, its subtlest scholasticisms, betraying, on and Solon, and Pisistratus, might be pre- every page, its broadest, freshest range sumed, beforehand, to know at least as of experience, its most varied culture, much about it as they, or because the its profoundest insight, its boldest grasp opinions of twenty-five centuries, in such of comprehension shall this crowning a case, might seem to he entitled to result of so many preceding ages of somo reverence, did the critics leave it growth and culture, with its essential, there?

and now palpable connection with the Two hundred and fifty years ago, new scientific movement of the time our poet-our Homer—was alive in the from which it issues, be able to conworld. Two centuries and a half ago, ceal from us, much longer, its hiswhen the art of letters was already mil. tory ?-Shall we be able to acoept in lenniums old in Europe, when the art explanation of it, much longer, the story of printing had already been in use a of the Stratford poacher ? century and a half, in the midst of The popular and traditional theory a cotemporary historical illumination of the origin of these works was rewhich has its equal nowhere in his- ceived and transmitted after the extratory, those works were issued that have ordinary circumstances which led to its given our English life and language first imposition had ceased to exist, betheir imperishable claim in the earth, cause, in fact, no one had any motive that have made the name in which they for taking the trouble to call it in quescomo to us a word by itself, in the hu. tion. The common disposition to receive, man speech; and, to this hour, we know in good faith, a statement of this kind, of their origin hardly so much as we however extraordinary-the natural inknew of the origin of the Homeric ep- tellectual preference of the affirmative

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