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Mr. Bloomfield offered a resolution in the words following: Resolved, That Henry Witbeck, Jr., be and he hereby is, elected assistant sergeant-at-arms of the Senate for the year 1921.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Baumes offered a resolution in the words following: Resolved, That Lee V. Gardner be, and he hereby is, elected principal doorkeeper of the Senate for the year 1921.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Gibbs offered a resolution in the words following: Resolved, That Frank Heilbron be, and he hereby is, elected first assistant doorkeeper of the Senate for the year 1921.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Meyer offered a resolution in the words following: Resolved, That John K. Marshall be, and he hereby is, elected stenographer of the Senate for the year 1921.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Walton offered a resolution in the words following:

Resolved, That a committee of two be appointed to inform the Governor that the Senate is organized and ready to proceed to business.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

The President appointed as such committee Messrs. Walton and Walker.

Mr. Fearon offered a resolution in the words following:

Resolved, That a committee of two be appointed to inform the Assembly that the Senate is organized and ready to proceed to business.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

The President appointed as such committee Messrs. Fearon and Boylan.

The above-named committees returned and reported that they had performed their respective duties.

Mr. Mullan offered a resolution in the words following:

Resolved, That Clayton R. Lusk be, and he hereby is, elected Temporary President of the Senate for the years 1921 and 1922. Mr. Boylan offered a substitute resolution in the words following:

Resolved, That James J. Walker be, and he hereby is, elected Temporary President of the Senate for the years 1921 and 1922. Mr. Mullan moved that the roll be called and that each Senator, as his name is called, rise and announce his choice.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

By direction of the President the Clerk called the roll and the several Senators responded, as follows:

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The President declared Clayton R. Lusk duly elected Temporary President for the years 1921 and 1922.

Mr. Burlingame offered a resolution in the words following: Resolved, That a committee of two be appointed to wait upon the Governor to inform him of the election of Clayton R. Lusk as Temporary President of the Senate.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative. The President appointed as such committee Messrs. Burlingame and Downing.

Mr. Robinson offered a resolution in the words following: Resolved, That a committee of two be appointed to wait upon the Assembly and inform that body of the election of Clayton R. Lusk as Temporary President of the Senate.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

The President appointed as such committee Messrs. Robinson and Cotillo.

The above committees returned and reported that they had performed their respective duties.

Messrs. Martin and Taylor, a committee from the Assembly, appeared in the Senate Chamber and announced that the Assembly is organized and ready to proceed to business.

Mr. Lusk moved the adoption of the following rules of the Senate for the years 1921 and 1922:

ORDER OF BUSINESS

1. The President shall take the chair at the hour to which the Senate shall have adjourned, and a quorum being present, the Journal of the preceding day shall be read, to the end that any mistakes therein may be corrected. After the reading and approving of the Journal the order of business shall be as follows: 1. The presentation of petitions.

2. Introduction of bills.

3. Messages from the Assembly.

4. Messages from the Governor.
5. Reports of standing committees.
6. Reports of select committees.

7. Communications and reports from State officers.
8. Third reading of bills.

9. Motions and resolutions. 10. Special orders.

11. General orders.

Messages from the Governor and Assembly, communications and reports from State officers, reports from the Committee on Privileges and Elections involving the right of a Senator to his seat, and reports from the Committee on Engrossed Bills, on Revision and on Rules shall be received at any time.

The Committee on Rules may sit at any time; the reception and consideration of its report shall always be in order, debate on its adoption shall not exceed one hour, one-half hour for and. one-half hour against, such time to be allotted by the Temporary

President and minority leader, and no other motion, except a motion by the Temporary President for a call of the Senate, to adjourn or to recess, shall be in order until the vote of the Senate is had thereon.

OF THE PRESIDENT

2. (1) The President shall preserve order and decorum; in case of disturbance or disorderly conduct in the lobby or galleries, he may cause the same to be cleared; he shall decide all questions of order, subject to appeal to the Senate. On every appeal he shall have the right, in his place, to assign his reasons for his decision. When the Senate shall be ready to go into committee of the whole, he shall name a chairman to preside therein.

(2) He shall assign to the doorkeepers their respective duties and stations.

(3) Immediately upon the final passage of any bill by the Senate, he shall certify that the same has been duly passed, with the date thereof, together with the fact whether passed as a majority, three-fifths or two-thirds bill, as required by the Constitution and Laws of the State, and deliver said bill to the Clerk.

OF THE TEMPORARY PRESIDENT.

3. The Temporary President, when acting as President, shall be invested with all the powers and duties conferred by these rules upon the President.

He shall appoint all committees except when the Senate shall otherwise order.

OF THE CLERK

4. (1) It shall be the duty of the Clerk to have the Journal of each day's proceedings printed, and copies thereof placed on the files of the President, Senators and reporters within three days after approval by the Senate.

(2) He shall also furnish each Senator daily with a printed list of the general orders, which shall be kept on file by the Superintendent of Documents, in the same manner as other documents. and he shall also prepare a daily calendar of all bills, engrossed or printed, for a final reading, and place and keep the same, together with printed copies of such bills, on the desks of each Senator; he shall see that all bills shall be acted upon by the Senate [SENATE JOURNAL]

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in the order in which they are reported and stand upon the calendar, unless otherwise ordered by two-thirds of the Senate.

(3) He shall present to the Governor, and enter upon the Journals, such bills as shall have originated in the Senate and been passed by both Houses. He shall, subject to the rules of the Senate, transmit to the Assembly all bills or concurrent resolutions. which have passed the Senate.

(4) He shall designate the persons entitled to admission to the floor as reporters for the public press, not exceeding thirty-five in number, and may revoke any such designations, but no person shall be entitled to the privileges of the floor of the Senate as a legislative reporter of a newspaper who is interested in pending or contemplated legislation, or who is employed or receives compensation for influencing legislation.

OF THE SERGEANT-AT-ARMS

5. The Sergeant-at-Arms, except when absent in the discharge of his duties, shall be in constant attendance upon the sessions of the Senate, and, under the direction of the President, aid in enforcing order on the floor of the Senate, in the lobbies, and in the rooms adjoining the Senate Chamber, and also see that no person remains on the floor unless entitled to the privileges of the

same.

OF THE RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF SENATORS

6. (1) Immediately after the announcement of committees, seats shall be assigned to Senators as follows: The majority shall occupy the seats at the right hand of the President, and the minority at the left hand of the President beginning at the center aisle. The Temporary President of the Senate shall occupy the middle seat on the aisle, and the minority leader the middle seat opposite. Members of the majority who cannot be seated to the right of the center aisle shall occupy seats on the last row to the left of the center aisle beginning with the seat on the aisle, and if more seats are required for the majority, then on the next to the last row commencing at the seat on the east aisle. The chairman of Finance, Judiciary and Cities shall be assigned seats on the center aisle. Senators who occupied seats at the preceding session may occupy the same seats if they desire, or exchange their seats to any seat

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