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with this kind of verse. The iambic movement, the noble gait of English poetry, rarely interrupted by a brief shifting to the springing foot of the trochee, is, in all its composure and simplicity, the very pace of these two great centuries. Lyrical poetry goes by in procession, from the stanza of Surrey to the ode of Dryden, to that measure. The dramatist in this matter keeps step and time with the lyrist; the numbers are different, the foot is the same. And Shakespeare's rhymes in the plays are, habitually, iambic - heroic couplets. In "Love's Labour's Lost," however, occurs, among the varied short iambic rhymed verses, the altered rhythm of a rough and imperfect anapæstic verse :—

"My lips are no common, though several they be."
Belonging to whom?" "To my fortunes and me."

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And in "The Taming of the Shrew" is this, with — in various places-two or three more couplets like it: —

""T was I won the wager, though you hit the white;
And being the winner, God give you good night."

Nothing sounds stranger than such a movement in Shakespeare's verse, but the strangeness is common with a quite evident identity of lax and careless rhythm -to the two plays.

After all, the value of this comedy is in the "Induction," and the value of the "Induction" is not only in its excellent humour, but in the external incidents-the direct allusion made here by Shakespeare to the daily landscape, the house, the householder of the Warwick

shire village known to him. Only in "The Merry Wives of Windsor" and in the "Second Part of Henry IV' do we come thus near to the roads that Shakespeare walked, the heath he looked upon, the man and woman he watched brawling. "The Taming of the Shrew," if it be of earlier date than the two plays just named, has the first passages of this homely external intimacy, and Kit Sly brings us and the Past acquainted. We let the Shrew go by-the excuse for her story is that it passes; but not so the Tinker.

ALICE MEYNELL.

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW

A Lord.

DRAMATIS PERSONÆ1

CHRISTOPHER SLY, a tinker.

Hostess, Page, Players, Huntsmen, and Servants.
BAPTISTA, a rich gentleman of Padua.

VINCENTIO, an old gentleman of Pisa.

LUCENTIO, Son to Vincentio, in love with Bianca.

Persons in the

Induction.

PETRUCHIO, a gentleman of Verona, a suitor to Katharina.

GREMIO,

HORTENSIO,

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TRANIO,

servants to Lucentio.

BIONDELLO,

GRUMIO,

servants to Petruchio.

CURTIS,

A Pedant.

KATHARINA, the shrew, daughters to Baptista.

BIANCA,

Widow.

Tailor, Haberdasher, and Servants attending on Baptista and
Petruchio.

SCENE-Padua, and Petruchio's country house

1 DRAMATIS PERSONE] This play was printed for the first time in the First Folio of 1623. The piece called The Taming of A Shrew, on which Shakespeare founded his work, was first published anonymously in 1594, and was reissued in 1596 and 1607. In the First Folio version of Shakespeare's play no list of "dramatis persona" appears, and the only divisions noted are the following: "Actus primus, Scæna Prima,” which stands at the head of the "Induction"; "Actus Tertia"; "Actus Quartus, Scena Prima"; and "Actus Quintus." Rowe, in his edition of 1709, first gave a preliminary list of characters. The accepted distribution into Acts and Scenes is due to Steevens.

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SLY

INDUCTION -SCENE I

BEFORE AN ALEHOUSE ON A HEATH

Enter Hostess and SLY

LL PHEEZE YOU, IN faith.

HOST. A pair of stocks, you rogue!

SLY. Y' are a baggage: the Slys are no rogues; look in the chronicles; we came in with Richard Conqueror. Therefore paucas pallabris; let the world slide: sessa!

HOST. You will not pay for the glasses you have burst?

SLY. No, not a denier. Go by, Jeronimy: go to thy cold bed, and warm thee.

HOST. I know my remedy; I must go fetch the thirdborough.

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5 paucas pallabris

[Exit.

.sessa!] "Paucas pallabris" is a corruption of

the Spanish expression "pocas palabras," few words. It appears

10

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