Imagens das páginas
PDF
[graphic]

a COMMERCE. HOME.

Tu rias't' oanrsanr isaxmio or us Gritxaar. Cassi-i- AND Funnel Conrarn' was held on Monday, Mr S. Laing in the chair, when a dividend was declared at the rate of 10 per cent. per annum (3s. per share) for the six months, as recommended in the directors' report, which was adopted. '1 he chairman remarked that the profit of the last half-year was made almost exclusively from ordinary every ~day business, and not by forming either English or foreign companies. The Land Mortgage Bank of India is the only company which the board has yet brought out. It has been considered desirable to bring out only companies which were likely to prove successful, and a considerable amount of caution and discretion is requisite for that purpose. In re ly to complaints from several shareholders as to the manner in whic the shares in the Land Mortgage Bank were allotted, the chairman said that the General Credit Company, in bringing out a new company on commission, could not control the allotment of shares, and he defended generally the course taken by the directors.

Tux riasr onnnuur stun-rise or run Losnos FINANCIAL Assocnt'rios took place on Monday. The accounts show a clear profit of 28,7651, out of which a dividend and bonus equal to 15 per cent. per annum (18s. per share) were declared, free of income tax, leaving 10,2401. to be carried forward. The chairman, Mr Hackblock, remarked that the chief feature was that the profit earned was made week by week by sound, legitimate, and every-day business, and not by adventitious and extraordinary circumstances, and there was every reason to expect its continuance. The new issue of shares (20,000) will be distributed pro rafa amongst the existing shareholders at 41.

remium per share. The amount of premium (80,0001.) so realised is to be set aside to form the nucleus of a reserve fund. From the 1st of October next, when there will be 151. per share paid up on each class, the two issues will rank equally. Mr J. E. C. Koch, hithcrto the general manager of the company, relinquishes that position to take his seat at the board as a director.

Ar rue ates:er or run Ocean MARINE Issuance Conrartr on Monday, a dividend and bonus, amounting together to 15s. per share, were declared. The result of the accounts is that this company, for the first two years of its operations, after paying all expenses of salaries and management, and writing off its preliminary expenses, was enabled to secure a profit in 1860 of about 20,0001, and in 1861 of 5,500L, sddcd to which the interest in 1863 was l7,0001.—making 42,5001, of which the directors, as above stated, recommend a division of 80,0001, in a bonus of 105. and 5s. per share dividend. The most satisfactory feature is, that on the 1862 account there remained on 31st December last a surplus of 58,5001, and against this there is only a liability of 330,0001., which has since been reduced to 290,000!., and which could be rte-insured for less than 3,0001. Looking, therefore, to the balance of 12.5001, and to an assumed profit on 1862 of 50,0001, it is reasonable to inter that, together with the interest to be earned in 1864, an increased dividend will then be paid, the company securing besides the formation of a good reserve fund.

’lnn Wasr Curronn Tm sun COPPER MINING Couras'v (Limited) is announced. This undertaking possesses a ver respectable direction, including three directors of the St. Just nited Mines. The aetts to be worked are known as the Ting 'l'ang, the West'l‘ing Tang, South Ting Tang, and thal Moyle, and are situated in the centre of a group of the most productive copper mines in Cornwall. The eastern boundary is the celebrated Clifford Amalgamated Mine. A vast amount of mineral wealth has been derived from the district. The present property is known to contain man productive lodes, and it is anticipated that important discoveries wi I soon be made. The mine possesses the advantage of economical transport, as a railway

es through it. It is also pointed out that “the late proprietors eft the works in good condition, with the surface buildings in their proper places; this will be a saving of man thousands of pounds and much valuable time to the company." he purchase money is to be 10,0001., half in cash and half in shares—a twenty-one ycars' lease, the work already done, the engine and other machinery upon the mine, the plant-houses, materials, 850., being included in the agreement. The capital is 80,0001., in 6,000 shares of 51. each, a In e number of which have already been applied for.

us Wannscuiart Personnel 0014qu is announced, with a capital of 120,000!., in shares of f01., to dcvelope the supply of oil from a locality in Wallachia of which certain grants have been obtained. The qualit and cost are stated to have been already satisfactorily tested by the Earth Oil Import Company, with whom lmngements have been made for the purchase of their plant, kc.

A'r mense'rrso or run THAMES TUNNEL Couramr on Wednesday,

[graphic]

In agreement with the promoters of the East London Railway for'

the sale of the Tunnel was' provisionally sp roved. The terms are that the railway company shall pay to the unnel Compan a sum rather above 173,0001., of which 100,0001. will be receive by the Treasury in discharge of the national claim, and the balance, subject to a charge of 4,0001. to the Waterman‘s Company, will be divided amongst the shareholders. The latter will still retain the adjoining propert in Rotherhithe, which realises 6601. per annum.

Tun NDOK, Biauusoirau, ann Sonru STAYPOBDBHIBI Barr: held their first ordinary meeting on Tuesday. The directors' report, which was adopted, stated the net profit on the operations of the seven months at 1,2111, which it was recommended should be carried forward to profit and loss new account. The directors look upon the progress made by the bank as highly satisfactory, es ecially conlidering that no business has been purchased, and that the capital of

the undertaking during the first two or three months was compara- i

tively small. They consider that the future profits will be larger, in

proportion to the increase of capital and to the extension of business,

while the expenses will be at a greatly reduced ratio. Tux Pnosri-zcrus or run TlTAXs'IC Srsiu. ann Iiiox Coxraxx (Limited) is in circulation, with a proposed capital of 350,0001. This

project has been organised under respectable provincial auspices, for i

the purchase and working of certain patented processes for im rovements in the manufacture of steel and iron, as invented by Mr lobert lfushet, of Coleford, Gloucestershire. The Works now in extensive

operation at that place have likewise been purchased by the company. i

It is affirmed that Mr Mushet's processes, “ cspccially when in comhinstion with the Bessemer process, will produce, from materials which will cost about 61. per ton, steel in no way inferior to that produced from the best Swedish iron." It is a favourable feature that for the letters patent, the goodwill of the business, dun, Messrs Hushet and Co. have agreed to accept paid-up shares; which they have agreed shall not be entitled to any dividend except when the other shares receive dividends at the rate of 61. per cent. per annum. The directors and their friends have hitherto, by a total subscription of 50,000!., put the works into operation. They desire now to extend the basis and enlarge the operations of the concern, and with that view they offer the remaining 5,000 101. shares to the public.

Tun Loxnoir into Covnrx Baax held their annual meeting on Thursday, when the directors' report was adopted. It stated the net profit for the six months at 84,3251, making a total of 98,6681., inclusive of 14,8431. brought forward. The usual dividend 0t 6 per cent, together with a bonus of 6 per cent., was declared for the six months, making a total distribution of 18 per cent. for the year. After the transfer of 10,0001. to the reserve fund, increasing it to 100,0001, there is a balance of 16,6681. to be carried forward to profit and loss new account. Owing to the great in~ crease in the business of the bank, the directors have reached

offered pm rota amongst the proprietors at 401. each, or 20!. premium ‘ per share. 0f the 300.0001. which this operation will produce' 150,0001. will be added to the capital of the com any, and 150,0001. ‘ ——the premium on the shares—to the reserve fun . The former will . then stand at 750,0001. and the latter at 250,000!., making a total of 1,000,000!. The report was unanimously adopted, and much satisfaction was expressed at the very favourable position of the company's affairs.

The Gnu-r East-sax Nonrussn JUNCTION RAILWAY is an, undertaking introduced by the General Credit Company. The lins,l of 108'} miles and 21} branches or connections, will run from Aakern and Doncsster, where it joins lines connecting it with Yorkshire and Lancashire, through Lincolnahire and Northamptonshire, to the Great Eastern near St Ives, opening up a new and cheaper route,l especially for goods, coals, and minerals, between the above districts and the metropolis. Half the capital of 1,500,000l. is taken by the, Great Eastern Company, six of whose directors are on the board. The line will also be worked by that Company at 45 per cent, and the shareholders are practically guaranteed 5 per cent.. minimum dividend out of the rest of the earnings, as well as those from the running on the Great Eastern from Stanton to London. |

Tue Guxonoan Inou Oas Coxraa'r (Limited), capital 40,0001, in 8,000 shares of 51. each, has issued its prospectus. This company has been formed for the purpose of purchasing a long lease of and working a deposit of argi laceous iron ore, in the parish of M ichaelston-super-Afon, in the county of Glamorgan. The estate consists of more than 1,000 acres, and is within five miles and a half from Britton Ferry Docks and the important iron works in this neighbourhood. The iron ore from which the greater part of the iron medal in this country is obtained, is found in the coal formations in regular, strata or pins of a few inches in thickness, and in “ balls ” or; “ nodules ” vary in in size, imbedded in shale, which moulders away i when exposed to t a air. The shale either scales off the ore, or isl easily detached from it. In this property there are twenty-three‘ inches of iron in six feet of ground. l

hftsanL/imtocs.—The Bank of England have notified that on and after the 2nd of March the New 171m per Centr., Reduced Tliree per Cents. Annuities for terms of years, and India Four per Cents. will be ‘ transferable without the dividend due on the 5th of April. The transfer books of Bank Stock are to close on the 16th of March and to open on the 6th of April.-—Tlie dividend declared at the meeting of the Telegraph to India Company was at the rate of 5 per cent. per annum for the six months—The London and Coledoninn Marine Insurance Company have appointed Mr E. England their underwriter.—At the annual meeting of the York City and Counly Bank the profits for the past year were stated at 18,7901. The usual dividend of 8 per cent., with a bonus of 5 per cent., was declared, and 5,7001. was added to the reserve, which was thus raised to 55,46OI.-—Tbo Continental Company for Boalbui'lrliny by Machinery (Thompson's patents) have made a distribution at the rate of 10 per cent. out of the deposit received from the purchasers of the French patents recently disposed of. -—Mr P. Vanderbyl, of the firm of Redfern, Alexander, and Co., ofl Great Winchester street, has joined the direction of the Financial Corporation (Limited).—-A call of 105. is to be paid on the shares in tho Malia and Mediterranean Gas Company (Limited) by the 25th Fob., and a call of 10s. on the shares in tlie Suburban 110ch Company (Limited) by the 22nd of Feb—An instalment of 11. on the second issue of shares (on which 11. has been deposited) is to be paid by the shareholders of the Indian Brandt Railway Company by the 15th March—1t is officially announced that the pro osed dividend on Great Northern Railway stock is at the rate of 8; per cent. per annnm, against 8% for the corresponding period of 186' , and that on Midland Railway stock at the rate of 7 per cent. per annum against 6§.—1\lr C. Gllpin, M.P., has been elected chairman of the Metropolitan and Provincial Bank, in the place of Lord Fermoy, M.P.—At the meeting of the Australian Agricultural Company on Tuesday, a dividend of 7s. 6d. per share was declared—The dissolution of the Oil Wells Company of Canada was confirmed at a meeting of the directors and shareholders on Tuesday. Mr J. II. Doyle was appointed oflicial liquidator, but his office will be a siiiecure, as be announced to the meeting that the capital has been returned in full to the members, and that every liability has been discharged—The directors of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company have declared a dividend at the rate of 4} per ccnt. per annum, and those of the Great Southern and Western of Ireland a dividend' at the rate of 4 per cent. per annum. In the former case the distribution for t e corresponding period of 1862 was at the rate of 4 per cent. per annuml and in the latter 5 per cent.-—-The directors of i the Thames and Mersey Marine Insurance Company have determined to lpropose to the shareholders at the forthcoming meeting a dividend at )tho rate of 10 per cent. per annum.——The half-yearly meeting of the _London, Chat/ram, and Dover Railway Com an is called for the 26th

inst.—A call of 2!. 10s. is to be paid on t e g shares of the Crystal lPalnce and South London Junction Railway Company by the 1st of I March—The receipts of the Grand Trunk Railway of Canada for the 1 week ending the 16th of January were 18,0451. sterling, being 1,8561.

less than in the corresponding week of last yen—The first ordinary meeting of the National Bank of Liverpool (Limited) is called for the ‘ 18th inst.-The directors of the South Italian Railway Company have ’announccd a third call of 21. per share, payable by the 5th of March. l-The Master of the Rolls proposes on the 8th inst. to order a further return of lOs. per share to the contributories of the Newcastle, Shields, , ‘ and Sunder-land Joint-Stock Ban/ting Company.—lt was formally noti- ‘ , fied on Wednesday that Mr Harris Cliubb, sea-elary to {lie Suml/rc and Manse and West Flanders Railway Companies, has abscondcd.

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic][graphic][ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic][graphic][graphic]

to augment the capital by the issue of 7,500 new shares, to be,

CORN MARKET, FRIDAY.-1Ironranoirs

Into London from the lat of February to the 4th of February, 1864, both inclusive.

[graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][merged small][merged small][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]
[graphic][graphic][graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]
[graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

HOUSE OF LORDS.

Tnnasnsr, Feb.4.—Tbis afternoon the Imperial Parliament was opened by Royal Commission. The ceremony was a very simple one. A few ladies assembled in the House of Lords, and occupied the back seats usually taken by the peers. In the galleries there were also a few ladies. As soon as the Royal Commissioners entered, the Lord Chancellor directed the Usher of the Black Rod to summon the House of Commons, and in a few moments afterwards the Speaker, in his State robes, and accompanied by a few members of the House of Commons, appeared at the bar. The Loan CHANCELLOB then rose, and read, in the following terms,

THE QUEEN‘S MESSAGE.

Mr Loans arm Gnsrtastnii,

We are commanded to assure you that her Majesty has great satisfaction in recurring again to the advice and assistance of her Parliament. Her Majesty is confident that you will share her feeling of gratitude to Almighty God on account of the Princess of Wales having given birth to a son ; an event which has called forth from her faithful people renewed demonstrations of devoted loyalty and attachment to her person and family. The state of affairs on the Continent of Europe has been the cause of great anxiety to her Majesty. The death of the late King of Denmark brought into immediate application the stipulations of the Treaty of May, 1852, concluded by her Majesty, the Emperor of Austria, the Emperor of the French, the King of Prussia, the Emperor of Russia, the King of Sweden, and afterwards acceded to by the King of Hanover, the King of Saxony, the King of Wurtemberg, the Kingof the Belgians, the King of the Netherlands, the Queen of Spain, the King of Portugal, and the King of Italy. That treaty declared that it is conducive to the preservation of the balance of power, and of the peace of Europe, that the integrity of the Danish monarchy should be maintained, and, that the several territories which have hitherto been under the sway ofthe King of Denmark should continue so to remain ; and for this purpose it was agreed that upon the death of the late King and of his uncle Prince Frederick without issue, his present Majesty King Christian IX. should be acknowledged as succeeding to all the dominions then united under the sceptre of his Majesty the King of Denmark. Her Majesty, actuated by the same desire to preserve the peace of Europe which was one of the declared objects of all the Powers who were parties to that treaty, has been unremitting in her endeavours to bring about a peaceful settlement of the differences which on this matter have nrisen between Germany and Donmark, and to ward off the dangers which might follow lrnm'a beginning of warfare in the north of Europe; and her Majesty will continue her efforts in the interost of peace. The barbarous murders and cruel assaults committed in Japan upon subjects of her Majesty rendered it neccssury thatdeinands should be made upon the Japanese Government, and upon the Daiinio by whose retainers some of those outrages were coininitti d.' The Government of the Tycoon complied with the demand made upon them by her Majesty's Government, and full satisfaction having been made, the friendly relations batman the two Governments have continued » unbroken. But the Daimio Prince of Satzumii refused to comply with‘the just and moderate demands which were made upon him. His refusal rendered measures of coercion necessary, and her Majesty regrets that while those measurgs have brought this Unimio to ‘an agreement for coinpliuncr, they led incidentally to the destructiou of} considerable portion ofthe town of Kagosimn. Papers on this subject will be laid before you. The iusnr-' rection which broke outlast year: among some portion of tho nativb inhabitants of vNew Zenlnnd still unfortunately continuos, but there is reason to hope that it will, before long, be put down. Her Majesty commands us to inform you that she has concluded a treaty with the Emperor of Austria,.tba Emperor of the French, the King of Prussia, and the Emperor of Russia, by which her Majesty consents to give up the protectorate of the Ionian Islands. and also agrees to the annexation of those Islands to the Kingdom of Greece. This treaty shall be laid before you. Her Majesty is also negotiating a treaty with the King of the l-lellenes for regulating the arrangements connected with the union of the Ionian Islands with the Kingdom of Greece. A

[graphic]

Gnmnxim or run Housn or Commas, ’ .“N

Her Majesty has desired the Estimates for the ensuing year to be

laid before you. They have been prepared with every attention to

economy, and with a due regard to the efficiency of the public servicot Mr Loans sun Gamzunn, ' '

Her Majesty commands us to inform you that the' condition of the country is, on the whole, satisfactory. The revenue has fully realised its expected amount; the commerce of the United Kingdom is increasing; and while the distress in the main tnriug districts has been in some degree lessened, there is reason to lop ' forward to an increased supply of cotton from various countries which have hitherto but scantily furnished our manufacturers with ths' material for their industry. Her Majesty has directed theta Commission shall be issued for the purpose ol revising the various forms of subscription and declaration required to be made by the clergy of the Established Church. A copy of that Commission will be laid before you. Various measures of public usefulness will'bo submitted to your consideration. Her Majesty commits, with confidence, the great interests’of the country to your wisdom and onto; she fervently prays that the blessing of Almighty God may attend your iii/eJibei-utions and prosper your Councils for the advancement oftho we fare and happiness of her loyal and faithful people. \ _

After the usual adjournment, the Marquis of Sucio moved the Address, and the motion was briefly seconded by Lord ABEBCROMBIB. —Lord DERBY, alter alluding to the birth of a son to the Prince of Wales as an event of happy promise for the future, referred with satisfaction to the general prosperity of the country, notwithstanding the interruption of the supply of cotton and the consequent distress in the manufacturing districts. He hoped, however, that the heaviest pressure of suffering was at an end, and stated the grounds on which be based his hopes of improvement. Passing to the other topics of her Majesty’s Speech, he referred to the Commission to be appointed to inquire into the subject of subscription by the clergy of the Church of England. He feared that the result of such an inquiry would not be proportionate to the magnitude of the machinery employed in it. He then called the _attention of the House to the portion of the Speech relating to foreign affairs. Her Majesty‘s Government had for two or three years past inainly rested their claim to public confidence on their foreign policy. They had abandoned tho question of Parliamentary Reform the moment it had served the purpose of placing them in oflice. The fulfilment of the promises they had made was defeated by Lord Russell, and when he was transferred to the more serene atmosphere of the House of Lords he pronounced the funeral oration of Reform. He had told them to “rest and be thankful ;" and from that time their foreign policy had been the groundwork of the claim of her Majesty's Government to public confidence. This policy be examined and criticised. Its chief principles were stated to be the maintenance ofa good understanding with France, nnd non-intervention with the internal affairs of other countries. As to non-intervention, it would be difficult to mention a country with whose affairs Lord Russell had not interfered. In fact, his main principle seemed to have been to meddle and to muddle. With great or small States his course was lecturing, blustcring, arid retreating. Like Bottom, the weaver, he wished to plnv _every part, but, above all, that of the Lion. He could roar tliiit it " would do any man's heart good to hear him," though he also

[graphic]

knew how to “ aggravate his voice, like any sucking dove! " But, seriously, he believed that England had been lowered and humiliated in the eyes of Europe by the foreign policy of the Government. England had not a single friend on the Continent, and its remonstrnnces were treated with contempt, both by the larger and smaller States. As to keeping up a good understanding with the Government of France, there was hardly a single question on which her Majesty's Ministers had not thwarted its policy. From the Mexican expedition England had withdrawn, and it had not supported the Emperor’s policy in relation to the Confederate States of America. It had also declined the Emperor's proposition of a Congress. He admitted the difficulties that would have been encountered, but if any country was lessjustified than another in meeting the suggestion with a blunt refusal it was England. This country had no interests that could have been afl'ected by the Congress. The proper course would have been to recognize the benevolent intentions of the Emperor, and, stating that England had no interest that could prevent her taking part in the Congress, to have expressed a readiness to co-operate in such a laudable design, provided we received assurances that other States would submit to such an arbitration. Then, if the plan failed, the failure would have, caused no ill-feeling between England and France. It must have been

known that the Danish and German question was pending, and if thel proposition of holding a Congress could have postponed but for a short time the extreme steps that had been taken, there would be now al better prospect of restoring the peace it was too late to preserve. As ‘ to the points in dispute between Germany and Denmark, it ought not‘ to have been difficult to settle them without an appeal to arms. iliid

England possessed the influence it ought to exercise, it could have‘ played the part of mediator, and the dificnlties that threatened the! peace of Europe might have been adjusted. But F rauce had bccu‘ alienated, Russia offended; they could not look to any European

Power for support. He hoped England was not committed to a

conflict with Germany on a question on which the Germans felt so strongly. Such a war would be a great disaster. He hoped Lord Russell would be able to assure them 'that the country was not com

mitied by any act of the Government either to a conflict with Ger

many or to the abandonment of an ally who had trusted to their protection. He pointed out the many dangers Germany incurred by

war. Any contest with England would give France the opportunity

of acting on any umbitious designs with regard to Germany if she

entertained them. In every case of' Lord Russell‘s interference he had

offended, not one side only, but both. He had oli'euded the Confe

derates, and from the Federals he had been met by ademand that out

blustarsd Lord Russell himself. -- The Federal- Government-held this country responsible for all the damage the commerce of the North had

suffered from tho Alabama. He hoped the 'despatch had been answered in a manner that would put an end to all such demands. In conclusion,

he recapitulatcd the existing difi'erencea between her Majesty's Government and most of the European Powers, and denounced the policy that had produced such embarrassments as a source of national danger.— Lord Russcti. defended the course he had taken on the ground that intervention gruerally failed of its object, and aggravated the evils it sought to prevent. He did not admit Lord Derby's principle, that England was bound to accept whatever Franco proposed. As to Mexico, hcr Majesty's Government had stated from the beginning that England had no intention of regulating the internal affairs of that country, We acted to obtain redress of our own grievances, not to not up any particular form of government. As to the French proposal in reference to the States of the American Confederacy, it would have irriiated the people of the North, and failed to attain its purpose. He believed the general policy of England fully approved the resolution of the Government to remain neutral in the conflict. As to the plan of a Congress, the Polish and Italian questions at once prevented Austria and Russia from taking any part in the proceeding, and without the co-operatiou of the great Powers the scheme must have failed. Her Majesty's Government had given the Emperor of the French every credit for his motives, but England was quitcjustilicd in considering whether the Congress was likely to promote the peace of Europe or not. In this question, as well as on the war in America, England had a right to pursue its own policy and consider its own interests. Having minutely described the reasons for negotiating the Treaty of 1852, to settle the succession of the Danish Crown, and sketched the present state of the dispute between Germany and Denmark, be characterised the anxiety of Austria and Prussia to rush into war as something inexplicable and melancholy. It was the wish of forty millions of Germans to be a great and united nation. But this they believed they could not become without attacking Denmark. The position of that kingdom was most unhappy. Whatever might be the form of the German Governments, whether the Conservative or the Democratic principle was in the ascendancy, the German mind

[graphic]

,segmed bent on the destruction of Denmark. Prussia and Austria had

not repudiated the Treaty of l852. To prove they had not he read the lust despatcli received from Berlin, containing the" reply of the Government of Prussia to a distinct question on the subject. Other expressions of the despatch, in reference to the future, he would not then examine. The Government had not advised Denmark to give up anything it was notright she should yield; nor was any materialaidcxpected from this country. Both France and England earnestly desired to maintain peace, and that being the case the war could not be of long duration. Her Majesty‘s Government had not committed itself to any policy likely to bring calamities on this country. He admitted it was the duty of the Government not to seek a policy from Parliament, but seriously to consider the situation of the country, and, having made up their minds as to the policy to be adopted, to lay it before Parliament, and to stand or fallby‘thc silent—Lord Gnnr thought England mighthave created an impression in Denmark that aid would be furnished to that country. If so, with the force at their command, more might have been done without difliculty, though he did not say that such a course ought to have been taken. He regretted the events that had involved this country in such difficulties in Japan, China, and New Zeuland.—Lord GRANVILLE denied that the Government was bound to interfere in the German and

Danish conflict, merely because it had a large force, without reference

to the interests of this country. The course the Government had laid down was thejust line of policy to pursue—to hold out no hope it could not realise, and to avoid any language tending to encourage those from whom the Government differed in supposing they could act with perfect impunity.—Thc motion for an Address was then agreed to.

F moan—In reply to a question from Earl Povvis as to the course the Government intended to pursue with respect to the Projected Railways within the Metropolis, Earl GRANVILLE said that the best way of dealing with the subject would be found in the recommendation of the committee which was appointed by their lordships' last year. One of those recommendations was that the Board of Trade should report on the subject, which had been done, and another was that a committee should be appointed by Parliament to further consider the subject. In accordance with that recommendation it was proposed to move for a committee in the other House, and in the event of its being done, then he proposed to move for a similar committee in their lordships' House; and supposing there should be no objection, the two committees would act as.onc.—-The Archbishop of YORK moved for copies of two reports of committees of tlic Ecclesiastical Commission. His object was to remove from their lordships’ mind the impression that the Commission was receiving much and doing little.—The Earl of Ravanswort'rn complained that the right rev. prelate had altogether omitted all reference to a large item set down as the cost of management, which he believe amounted to something little short of 60,0001 per annum. He thought the time had now arrived when it should be fully considered whether the Ecclesiastical Commission, as at present constructed, was

[graphic]

_ the best body for dealing with such large sums of money as came under

[graphic]

their control—The Archbishop of Csutaanunr defended the committee from the charge of extravagance. There was the cost of three large establishments included in the charge for management, and he did not think their lordships would consider 60,0001. too much, when it was considered that they had to deal with property valued at 30,000,000L —The Earl of Povvls objected to the large amount charged for management.—The Bishop of LONDON said the ecclesiastical members of the Commission were not responsible for the financial arrangements of the Commission. They were conducted by that portion of it which was presided over by the noble earl (Chichester), who he sswin his place, which was termed the “ estates committee."—Tho Earl of Cuicirns'rita defended the course taken by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners.

HOUSE OF COMMONS.

THURSDAT.—NEW Waits having been moved for Durham, Tewkelbury, and Winchester, various notices q/‘mols'on were given, and then the Address was moved by Lord R. Gnosvanoa and seconded by Mr Gammon—The debate was opened by Mr DXSBAELI, who began by complaining ofthe deficiencies in the Speech. No notice was taken, he observed, of the condition of Ireland. It would have been wise and politic, be thought, to acknowledge not only the existence ofdistress in Ireland, but the manner in which it had been borne. He should like, he said, to have seen some reference to America in the Speech, the omission of which he considered strange. It would have been satisfactory to know whether the principle of neutrality was still recognized, and whether, during the Recess, it had been impartially observed and strictly enforced. Nothing was said about China, or of the diplomatic action regarding Poland, or of the proposal of the Emperor of the French for a Congress. There was a still more remarkable and a significant omission, which the House could not allow to pass unnoticed. Parliament was not congratulated, as usual, upon the friendly relations between this country and foreign Powers. Reviewing the diplomatic action of the Government in relation to Russia, Greece, and France, he censured the mode and manner in which the proposal of the French Emperor for a Congress had been met by the Foreign Secretary. Although it could not be said that the affair of Slesvig-Holstein was not noticed in the Speech of the Royal Commissioners, he complained of the manner in which the question had been put before the House of Commons, showing that her Majesty‘s Government avoided giving an opinion upon it. The paragraphs in the Speech appeared to him to be drawn up to prepare the Home for what were considered the logical conscquenccs of Lord Palmerston's speech of last year. He objected to this mode of treating the House. if we went to war, let the House be sure of the policy cfthe Government; and if war was necessary, that it might not have been preventéd. He had suggested reasons, he said, why 1h. House should look with some suspicion upon the foreign policy of the Government. He protested against their coming to Parliament without a policy. They were bound to tell the country what policy they recommended, and, if the cause were just, the country would support them.--Lord PALMERSTON observed that the objections of Mr Disraeli related not to what the Speech of the Royal Commissioners contained, but to what it did not contain; and be briefly eXplaincd the reasons for the omissions complained of. As to the manner in which the proposal of the Emperor of the French had been received and answered, he denied that there was anything unconrteoiis in the despatchcs of Earl Russell. The habits ot~ this country were more plain and simple than those of other countries; but there was nothing on our part that could bejustly called uncourteous or unfriendly, and our relations with France were as cordial as before. With respect to the Slesvig-Holstein question, Mr Disraeli complained that the Government came down to the House without a policy. He denied it. The policy of the Government was to endeavour to bring the question toa friendly settlement, in connexion with the Treaty of 1852. He was happy to say that, within the last few hours, he llld received information that Austria and Prussia were prepared to declare their readiness to abide by the Treaty. and to maintain the integrity of the Danish monarchy. He proceeded to explain the course of action adopted by the Diet and by Austria and Prussia, its objects, and the causes which had rendered the Government of Denmark backward in fulfilling what he considered to be its obligations. The required concessions, however, had been virtually made by Denmark; but, unfortunately, Austria and Prussia, in spite of the urgent suggestions and offers of a guarantee by the British Government, had determined to take possession of Slesvig as a material guarantee,—a principle which had been counted when acted on by Russia. They had, however, renounccd any intention to dismember the Danish monarchy. In conclusion, he observed that the policy of the Government was. in short, a policy of peace, its object being to prevent quarrels and dii~i~ sions in Europe, and that policy they would continue to pursue as long as it received the a probation of the couutry.-—Mr S. Firzoaitann contended that Lord Pa merston had not answered the objections of Mr Disraeli, who had complained that the past policy of the Government had been confused, vacillating, and contradictory, and he pointed out indications of these characteristics of their policy in their diplomatic communications with the Danish Government in relation to the Duchies. Having brought matters to a dangerous crisis, he wanted to know what the Government proposed to do, in order, in furtherance of their peace policy, to secure the peace of Europe. If we were to stand by and see'concessiou made after concession, our policy would bejustly stigmatised as an iguominious policy.—-Mr Haunssr adverted to a declaration by Earl Russell, that, by the violation of the Treaty of Vienna, Russia had forfeited a' title to Poland, and asked why that declaration had been withdrawn from a despatcli. He complained of the policy of the Government in relation to Poland, and accused the Emperor of Russia of being the real author of the severities exercised towards the Poles. With regard to the Danish question, he examined the history of the Treaty of London, and denied its validity. The question, he said, was one in which we ought not to have interfered. Denmark was actually dismembered, and Lord Russell was responsible for it.-—The CHANCELLOR of the Excunouan denied that there was any division in the Cabinet on the Slesvig-Holstcin question, and said the sum and substance of the advice which the Government had given to Denmark was, that she should fulfil her engagements.—Lord J. hlANNEBS asked what was the real worth of the (It'clmllon of Austria and Prussia spoken of by Lord Palmerston, Lord Russell having stated that he could place no reliance on it, and could scarcely understand it. -Mr PEACOCKE and Mr H. Barnum condemned the Govemmeut for its too great deference to the United States.-—Sir J. PAKINGTON said he understood the despatch stating that Austria and Prussia would enter into a formal declaration of adherence to the Treaty of 1852 was accompanied with conditions which deprived it of all value.—.\Ir LAYARD read the dcspatcb, which elicited derisive cheers from tho Opposition—Mr Kmonsxn hoped that Government would not incur the danger of war from any fear that the balance of power in Europe would be lost—After a few observations from Mr annisos'rs, the Address was agreed to.

FRlDAY.-—Mt‘ Foas'nscnn asked the Under-Secretary of State for Warwhether he would lay upon the table of the House the proceedings of the late Courtdltsrli'al on Colonel Crawlcg, together with the plans referred to in the evidence: and whether, with a view to the elucidation of such plans. an opportunity would be afforded to members of the House of inspecting the models produced before the Court-Martial.—The Marquis of HARTINGTON said it was not desirable generally to lay proceedings of Courts-Martial bell-re the House, but under the peculiar circumstances of the present case, if the lion. member would move for the production of the documents in question, they as Well as the plans would be laid on the table—Lord R. GROBVENOB brought up the report on the Address to the Royal S , which was reach—Mr Wins-zero: objected to that portion 0 the secondor's speech which spoke of the internal prosperity of the empire, although be here testimony to his high ability. How c0uld that apply to Ireland? The emigration from Ireland between the years 1841 and 1863 was 2,718,000, and that emigration was increasing. He thought that. there should have been some expression of sympathy for the sufferers in Ireland, similar to that with respect to Manchester. He had no hope of improvement from the efforts of the local government in Ireland.

[graphic]
[graphic][graphic][ocr errors]

Navar. Ourselves—A paper was read on Monday night at the United Service Institution, by Capt. E. Gardner Fishbourne, R.N., C 15., on the subject of Naval Ordnance. The great interest felt in the question was manifested by an unusually numerous attendance, including many officers and gentlemen whose names are associated with recent improvements in the science of gunnery. Suspended on the walla were large size drawings of Armstrong guns, both muzzle and breech loading, to illustrate the various phases of manufacture which that system has undergone ; and cross sections and models, to show the different plans of riding which have been adopted, such as tho multigruovo and shunt system of Armstrong, Whitworth’s hexagonal. Commander Scott's centrical system, and various English and American plans. On the table were models of Armstrong's Dahlgren'a, \Vhitworth'e, Parrott's, and various kinds of projectiles, including the GOO—poundcr, and the famous polished steel spherical shot which has lately made such havoc with the 4! and 5} inch armour plating. Though ostensibly on the subjr-ct of naval ordnance, the greater portion of the gallant officer’s paper was devoted to demonstrating the defects of the Armstrong system, the subject being illustrated by numerous and elaborate drawings, models, and tabular statements. In unequivocal terms he stated his opinion that the Armstrong gun and projectile were both failures, and that they having been officially retained, the country had been prevented from having guns and projectiles on a right principle, and put to an useless expenditure of two and a half millions. Most practical artillcrists now, he said, were of opinion that the Armstrong multigrcove system had failed. That had been conclusively shown by the performance of those guns at iron plates at short distances. The shunt system was a little, and not much better, and even in the opinion of those who admired genius, was not what was required for a naval gun. That being so, it. was important to raise adiscussion on the question, with a view to determine on a better description of gun and projectile. This was the more necessary, as the violation of the principles of gunnery and mechanics in thc Armalrong system could not fail rapidly to destroy gunsso constructed. Naval guns required to be used at distances uncertain in amount, but generally much within 2,000 yards. They required weight and strength to enable a high velocity to be imparted to the shot, and should be rifled so that a spherical shot could be used, as well as an elongated projectile, without injury to the grooves. If a correct mode of procedure were adopted, these necessary eonditiuns were easy of attainment. The more slowly motion was first communicated to a projectile, and the less obstruction it met with afterwards, the less would be the tension upon the gun. If, therefore, matters could be so arranged as to burn a little powder at first, a little more afterwards. and so on, so that the greatest amount of gas should be generated when the projectile was in motion, the greatest amount of force would be applied to its propulsion, and the lowest tension would be brought upon the gun. That principle had been most approximated to in the old smooth-bore gun. Referring to a table of the initial velocities of difl‘r-rent guns, with their weight of projectile and powder-charge, he proceeded to demonstrate from the low initial velocity of the Armstrong, as compared with others, that in that gun the projectile did not move untrltbe whole charge was exploded, and then proceeded to show the enormous tensile strain which was thus caused, and described the injuries which resulted to Armstrong guns from this cause. It had been found from experiment that to force an Armstrong projectile slowly through the bore required a force of forty tons. He calculated that the tension on these guns was eighteen tons to the square inch. The lead-coated projectile being made larger than the bore, and retained so long exposed to the heat of the ignited charge, the lead was melted. This fouled the grooves, and destroyed the accuracy of the fire. The melting of the lead was much facilitated by the lubricator, which the construction of the gun required. He condemned the squeeze given at the muzzle, both in - the multigroove and shunt gun, and

[graphic]

pointed out that it checked the projectile where it ought to be allowed to travel most freely. It also caused the shells to burst near the muzzle, and sometimes even within the gun, which was frequently split and destro ed. He mentioned several instances in which Armstrong gune ha been so disabled or destroyed, and pointed out how much guns having this squeeze at the muzzle had been improved by being shortened in front. He condemned the comparative trials which have taken place at difl'erent times between the Armstrong and smooth-bore, as not having given full development to the capebilities of the latter. Exhibiting a model of tho shunt gun, he pointed out the tendency of the change in the direction of the projectile within the bore to destroy the studs; described the ill consequence of this and of the subsequent squeeze at the muzzle, contrasting it. with the form of grooving adopted by Commander Scott for large guns, and by General Boileeu for small arms, showing how readily and easily in these the shot was centred, going out smoothly without interruption or check. He read some extracts from naval ofiicers engaged recently in Japan, all of whom described the Armstrongs, especially the larger calibres, as failures in action, and inferior to the 68-pounder smooth-bores. Summing up the results of his observations, he came to the conclusion that the projectile and the multigroove system of riding were most erroneous in principle; that the shunt gun, though decidedly better, was far below many other systems. Nothing would compensate for the want of high velocity. Smooth-bores were found up to certain distances to give the highest velocities. So that they must have either smoothborc guns, or, better still, rifled guns which would admit of using spherical shot as well as elongated iron projectiles and molten iron shells. The only two guns at present that fulfilled any of these conditions were those of Mr \Vhitworth and Commander Scott. The former, however, could not fire spherical shot or molten iron shells, so that no choicr-zivas left but the gun of Commander Scott. Pointing out the importance of determining what ought to be the proper amount of windage in guns, be next went into the question of the best material for their construction, expressing an opinion of the superiority of cast-iron over wrought, on account of the greater hardness of the former, but stating that Bessemer steel ought to be adopted. That metal, which would hear a strain offorty~flve tons to the square inch, had been recommended for adoption by Colonel Wilmot, when he was superseded by Sir William Armstrong. If that recommendation had been adopted, the country would have bcen spared the two and a half millions spent in the production of the costly and inefficient Armstrong gun.

[graphic][graphic][ocr errors]

Tun Duchess 0? Paula died at Venice on the 1st inst. Louise Marie Therese dc Bourbon, daughter of the late Duke de llcrri, was born on the 21st Sept., 1919, and married in November, 1845, Prince Ferdinand Charles Ill, of Bourbon, Duke of Forms, who succeeded to the Dukedom of Parma, Piacenza, and the States annexed, on the abdication of his father, Charles Louis, in March, 1849. He did not long reign over llisduchy, nor was his short reign by any means peaceful or happy. His career was cut short by an'nssassin. who stabbed him in the abdomen with a dagger in the streets of l’arrna, on the afternoon of March 26, 1854, and after lingering for two days he expired. Immediately on his death the late duchoss, his consort, was proclaimed regent during the minority of her son, Prince Robert; the Ministry of Parma was dissolved, and Baron Ward, a prote'ge' of the Austrian Government, was ordered to leave the country, never to return. One of the results of the late war in Italy was that the duchess-regent found it necessary to quit her States, which were annexed to Piedmont. at the end of the year, notwithstanding a protest sent by her from Zurich, and the clauses in her favour inserted in the Treaty of Villnfranca. The young duke, Robert 1, the present claimant to the duchy, who was born in Jul , 1848, and was consequently six years old at the death of his fat ler, has been living in retirement with his mother since their withdrawal from Parma in 1860. He has one brother and two sisters, viz., the Princess Marguerite, born in 1847; the Princess Alice, born in 1849; and Prince Henri, born in 1851.

The DUCHESB or Gonnorr died at Huntly Lodge, Aberdecnshirc, on Sunday evening, the immediate cause of death being gout in the stomach. She was in her seventieth year. She was the daughter of Mr Brodie, of the Burn, Kincardincshiro, and was married to the late Duke of Gordon in 1813. The duke died in 1836, And as he left no issue the title became extinct. 1' The Duke of Richmond now succeeds to the Aberdesnshire estates; The Duchess of Gordon has for some years past. lived in a very retired manner at Huntly Dodge, doing a

[graphic]

great deal of good among the poor, promoting education, and otherwise working for the good of the district. She was the main founder and a great suppoer of the outdoor religious meetings that have taken place during the last few years at Huntly.

LIEUT.~GINERAL Sla Aanxaunsn Kaxnnnr CLanx-Kzannnr, K.C.B., and K.H., of Knookgray, Kirkcndbrightshiro, Colonel of the Scots Greys, died on Saturday at his residence, Oxford terrace, l'lvde park, aged eighty-one. He entered the army in 1802, and served in the Peninsula with the Royal Dragoons from September, 1809. to October, 1813. At the battle of Fuentes d’Onor he had 1111 horse struck down by a shell, and he was selected to command a party of cavalry advanced to watch and report the enemy’s movements during the siege of lladejos; he was thanked for his services by Lord Lyncrlocb. He served also in the campaign of 1815, and at the battle of Waterloo had two horses killed under him. besides himself receiving two severe wounds. While leading his squadron in a successful charge against Count d'Erlon's corps at Waterloo, perceiving an eagle to the left, he changed the direction of his squadron, ran the officer through the body who carried it, and captured the eagle, which belongvd to the 105th French Regiment of Infantry, and is new in Chelsea Hospital.

Miss Annulna Ana's: Paoc'rrn, the eldest daughter of the poet “Barry Cornwall," died prematurely and unexpectedly on the 2nd inst., having herself already achieved a high reputation as a poct and woman of lettcrs. Miss Procter first became known to the public by ‘ Lyrics and chends,’ published 1858431, and by ‘ A Chnpletol' chs' (1862). In her poems there is much of her father’s tenderness and grace, and note little of his vigour. In 1861 she undertook the editorship of a volume called ‘The Victoria Regia,’ consisting of poetry from all sorts of contributors, from Alfred Tennyson to Isa Craig.

M. Favanns: nu L'ANoLeua, died at La Guaiane Francoise on the 12th December, 1863. He had been for twenty-two years Deputy from the French Colonies, and for the last ten years Governor of Cayenne, where his loss will be much felt and deplored.

Enaarure.—In our last week's Obituary Notice of the late Mr Woods, 6th line from the bottom of the first column, for “ Gender in his Modern Parables," read " in his Modern Traveller."

Tire nearns ls' Loxnorr LAST wens: were 1,749; in the previous week the number was 2,180. The average corrected for increase of population is 1,529. It appears, therefore, that the modality of last week, although much less than any the returns have yielded since the cold weather set in, was more by 220 than it would have been if the average rate had prevailed. 01 the deaths registered last week from diseases of the organs of respiration 339 occurred from bronchitis, which in its slighth form is commonly designated as a “ cold on the chest," and arises in the majority of cases from exposure to a low temperature. Pneumonia carried off 184 persons, asthma 38, lnryngitis eight. Phthisis, or consumption, was fatal in 170 cases. In the epidemic class of diseases 12 deaths are ascribed to smallpox, 23 to measles, 53 to ecarlatina, 11 to diphtheria, 82 to whooping-cough, 63 to typhus, 14 to croup, and 20 to diarrth 744 persons died under twenty years of age, 484 were twenty and under sixty years, and 486 were sixty years and upwards. The deaths of 15 nonngenariaua are recorded, the oldest of whom was a chimney-sweeper, who had attained the age of ninety-nine years and eleven months.

[graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

triumphant and enthusiastic success of the great Tragic Artiste, Miss Batcmln, on her first appearance in the character of LEAH, in the new five-act Drama of that title, having been nightly repeatede even exeeedetl,during the last nineteen weelle amidst the applause and; tears at rrowded audiences, and the profound impression treated upon all who have witnessed the touching impersonation by Miss Bateman of the heart-broken Jewish maiden, bcin confirmed by the unanimous verdict and critical a rave of the entire

real. the Manager of the NEW ADELPHI THEATI'LE _ as the honour to announce that Miss Batemen will appear in the New Drama of LEAH EVERY EVENING, till further_notice; and, in order to meet as far as pusaible the increasingdeniand for stalls, has eddul two more rows to those previously existing.

[graphic][merged small][graphic]
[ocr errors]

increased. During

[graphic]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small]

has been, during twenty-five years, emphatically sanctioned by the Medical Profession. and universally accepted by the Public, as the best Remedy for AClDl'l‘X of the STOMACll, HkiAlt'I‘llU-BN, HEADACHE, GOUT, and INDIGBSI'IUN, and as a nuld Apericnt for delicate constitutions, more apt» cislly for Ladies and Children. When combined with the ACIDULA'I‘EDLEMON SYRUP, it forms an agreeable Efl'crveecsng Draught, in which its Aperient qualities are much Hot Seasons and in Hot Climates the noun/la use of this aim 1e and elegant remedy has been found highly beneficial. tie prepared iina state of perfect arm and of uniform strength) by DINNIILI'OltD and Co., 72 New Bond street, London; and sold by all respectable Chemists throughout the World.

[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]

'3 I-Iomtto ethic Practitioners, and the ladies! Prefeuion eneraly recommend C as as beingshe most of all beverages. \ hen the doctrine of, honitnopethy was first introduced Into this country, there weraJe he obtained as preparalloaeol Cocoa either attractive to the tensor acceptableto the stomach '. the nutwaa elthsr supplied in its' crude state or so. unekilfully manufactured as to obtain llrtle no'lce. J. KPPS. at London, Homopathlc Chemist; was

i induced in the year 1839 to sun his attention to'thiasnb

feel, and at length succeeded, with the assistance olelaborate machinery, in belng the first to produce an article run: in its ccmposiliun. and so ratified by the perfect triluratlan it receives In the leeit passes through. as to be

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][merged small]

Burton; Secretary, 11. Boolean.

Sold in bottles 2s. 611. each, wholesale, A. Slclgh, 13 mm
Drltsla, and all I'atcnt Medicine Vendors.

J. HcCALL and 00..
PROVISION STORES, 187 ROUNDSDI'I'CH, NIB.
'.' Prise Medal for Patent Process of Preserving Pro-

vislous without overcooking. whereby freshness and flavour are retained.

[graphic][graphic]

WINES—PURE AN D CHEAP.
' IKE IHYEBIAL WINE COMPANY,
Consisting of leading Growers of Clutch, Parts, Sherri“, he,
Imports the choicest Wines,
And sells tothe Public at reasonable prices.-
Cattens—Marylebone Court House, w.
Sroals alrn Onions—314 Oxford street, W.
Earner arm nor-rune Vanna-15 John street, Crutcbed
Friars, 5.0., Inudon.

[graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]

l 6 Edwards street, Portmau square. London, W.

[ocr errors]
[graphic][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][merged small][merged small][graphic][ocr errors]
[graphic]

- l MOSES and SON respectfully call . attention to their large and_well-assortod Stock of Juvenile Clothing. The newest fabrics are. combined with the latest and most fashionable designs, and the best workmanship. D. Moses and Son give particular attention to this important branch of their business, and they can with confidence afllrm that the rim are such us must satisfy the most economical. This epartment is in a distinct part of the premises, which will be found a great convenience for Ladies and Children.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][subsumed][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]

THE GREAT NORTHERNARAILWAY . COMPANY. .

The Directors entertain APPLICATIONS for ALLOTMENTS of GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY DEBENTUltE STOCK, which has been created under the ‘ powers of the Company's Act of 1858, for the purpose of paying off and extinguishing the mortgage debt of the Company.

The Stock has a fixed and perpetual yearly dividend or interest, at the rate off per cenr. per annum; and such dividend or interest is the first charge upon the tolls and , undertaking, and lands, tenements, and herediinments of the Company, and has priority of payment over all other dividends on any other siock or shares, whether Ordinary, Preference, or Guaranised.

Any amount of stock not being a fraction of a pound can i be subscribed for.

interest will commence from the date of the receipt of the money by the Company, und will be paid half-yearly, on the 1511i January and léih July, by warrants on the Company's Bankers, which will be sent to the address of each registered proprietor. '

Communications on the subject to be addressed to l

HENRY OAKLEY, Secretary.

Secretary's Ofiice. King’s-cross Station, London, l

November, 1863. | l

[graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][graphic]
[graphic]

until Saturday evening at sunset, when ‘ is i

. until Eleven o'clock.

All Articles are marked the lowest prices in plain figures.

Any article not approved of will be exchanged, or the money returned. ‘ :

List of Prices, with Rules for Self-measurement, Fashion Card, and our new pamphlet “ On Modern Costume" (a sequel to " Gossip on Dress“), gratis and post free.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][ocr errors][merged small][graphic][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small][merged small]

OLLOWAY’S OINTMEN'I‘

and HHS—DANGEROUS CHEST COMPLAINTS. 'l he enumeration of theses discuss is scarcely necessary. as unfoitnnutely rnost Englishmen know them to their cost. Whooping-cough, croup, common colds, influenza, bronchitis, a-tlima. pleurisy, inflammation if ilie lungs, and even consumption in its earlicr singes, are best treated by rubbing Holloway‘s Ointment on the chest, and upon ibo back between iho shoulders. It penetrates Internally, checks the cold shiverings, relieves the over-gorgcd lungs, gradually removes the oppression from the chest, and restores the obstructed respiration Illthtl‘lo so distrestlngly dhlurecuble and highly dangerous In treating this cluls ofidisesilsesbillolloway‘sll’ills shurald always be taken while us no t o ntmout; iiey purl y ihs blood, romot 01'splrltlon, sod sllsy dangerous irritations, p g ‘1

[graphic]
[graphic]

ADVA men s w OFFICE RS and‘ OTllElt PERSONS IN ENGLAND are made by the Directors of the SOVEREIGN LIFE OFFICE ut 5_pCr ecnt. interest, and a policy of Assurance. _ .

Every information will ,be given on application at the Ofllces, 48 St Jorncs's street, Piccadilly, SM.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]

. i _ ' II Ladies“ or Gentleman's Gold English Lever do. 18 ,, Strong Silver Lever Watches - - - - 5 ,, Genilenieii's Gold Compensation Balance Watches - - - - - - ' '40 ,, Silver do. do. - - 2'5 ,, Murine Cbronomeicrs - - 35

.I - ll

Gold and Silver Pocket Clironoinetcrs, Astronomical, l'urret, and Bracket Clocks of every description. An elegant assortment of London-unide l-‘ine Gold Albert and Guard Chains, kc.

Den-r, 61 Strand (adjoining Couits‘s Bank) ; 34 and 35 Royal Lxchiinge, and at the Clock and Marine Compass Factory, Somerset Wharf, Strand. London.

\HANDELIERS in BRONZE and ORMOLU for DINING-ROOM and LIBRART. Candelabra, Moderator Lumps, in llronze, Ormoiu, China, and Glass. Statucttes in I'm-inn, Vases and other Ornaments, in a Show Room erected expressly for these articles. OSLEII, 45 Oxford street, W.

[ocr errors]

UPERIOR DIN IN G-ltOOM h URN I

TO BIL—Fifty sets of Dining Tables, and Sixty Sideboards, of elegant dos" s; also, an immense variety of Diningroom Uhairs,wit the prices marked in plain figures, are now on View in the Show-Rooms of Messrs DRUCE and 00.. 68, 69. and 68 Baker street. I

NIL—NO Easy Chairs and Settees, and 100 Fashionable

Wardrobes, to select from. A Warranty for Twelve Mouths is given. Down Quilts, 0s. 6d. each.

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]

CO N STI PATION. D E ii I LITY, NEIWOUSNESS, DTSPEPSIA, COUGll, ASTHMA, CA'l‘AltlIll. CONSU MPTION, DlAllltllCEA, nll NERVOUS, BILIOUS, LlVlilt, and STOMACH COMPLAINTS, in every stage, are only aggravated and acceleratedby drugs of every description, but perfectly curable by

U BARRYS HEALTH-RESTORING
REVALBNTA ARABICA FOOD, as proved by thou-

sands of cases which had been considered hopeless. We note a few: Cure No. 58,216 of the Marchioncss do Brchau, aris, of a fearful liver com laint wasting away, with a nervous palpitatiou all over, ad digestion, constant sleeplessness, low spirits, and the most intolerable nervous agitation, which prevented even her sitting down for hours together, and which for seven years had resisted the careful treatment of the best French and English medical men.—

Cure No. 1,771. Lord Stuart de Decies, Lord-Lieutenant of

Waterford, of many years' dyspc 'a.—Cure No. 49,8“.

“Yilty ears“ indescribable agony rom dyspepsia, nervous

ness,ast inn, cough, constipation, flatulency, spasms, sick

ness. and vomiting. Marin Joly-"-Uure No. 46,270. Mr

James lioborts, of h‘ranrley, Surrey, of thirty years' diseased

lungs, spitting of blood liver derangement, and artial

deainese—Cure No. 47, 21. Miss Elizabeth Jaco s, or extreme nervousness, indigistion, gatherings, low spirits,

and nervous fancies.—Cure o. 54,8111. The ltev. James '1‘.

Cam bell, Pakenbam, Norfolk, “of indigestion and torpidiiy

of t e liver, which had resisted all medical treatment."—

In tins, Ilb. 2s.9d.' 211)., 4s. 6d.; 51b., 11s.; 121b., 225.;

24112., {On—dsrry du'Bai-r and Co., No. 77 Regent street.

Inndou- also at 01 Graccc urch street; 4 Cheapsidc; 63 and

150 Oxford street; 64 Upper Baker street.

[graphic][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]

The quantities above specified of each urilcle of suppfy are only approximate estimates of what may probably be requlrcd within the period oi the Contract. but the Couliscior will be held liable to dl'llVCf such qusniiiies as may be

. demanded under competent authority, whether more or less

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]

“UN LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY, Til READN l-LBDLE STREET. LONDON.

l‘be Premiums re uircd by this Society for insuring young lives are lower than i use of many other old-cstablishcd Offices, and insurers are fully protected from all risk by an ample

usriintee fund in addition to the accumulated funds derived From the investments of Premiums.

Policies effected now will participate in four-fifths, or 80 per cent , of the profits, according to the conditions con. tinned in the Society's t‘rospcctus.

l‘he Profits of "11’ Society are divided every five years, and Policies effected before Midsummer, 1865, Will participate at the next division.

No charge for service in the Militia or in any Icomanry or Volunteer Corps in the United kingdom.

Policy Stamps paid by the Office. _

Prospectuses may be obtained at the Ofiice in Threadneedle street, London, or of any of the Agents of the Society,

[merged small][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]
[graphic]

THE PERFECT SUBSTITUTE FOB.
SILVER.

The real Nickel Silver, Introduced more than thirty years ago by WILLIAM S. BURTON, when plstedb the patent process of Messrs lllkingtou and Co., is beyond alIcompan'sou he very best article next to sterling silver that can be employed as such, either usefully or ornamentslly, as by no possible test can it be distinguished from real sdvei'.

A small useful set, guaranteed of first quality for finish and durability, as follows;

[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]

Any article to be had singly at the siimc prices. All 01! chest to contain the above, and a relative number of knives, to, 21.15s. Tea and coffee sets, dish covers, and corner dishes, crucv. and liqueur frames, Ac, at proportionate prices. All kinds of re-plsting done by the patent process.

[merged small][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][merged small]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]

SLACK'S SILVER ELECTED PLATE

Is a coating of pure Silvcr over SLscit’s NICKEL, a metal amalgamated, on chemical and scientific principles, almost to the only and whiteness of Silver, which renders it, as a basis for 'lectro Silveriug, the best article that can be produced, while the fact of twenty years” wear is ample proof of its durability.

[merged small][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][graphic]
[ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]
[merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small][merged small]
[graphic]
[graphic]

HE GENERAL CREDIT and nuance murmur of 1.0sz (Limited) are prepared to RECEIVE SUBSCRIPTIONS for the CAPITAL of the cacsr assrsan NORTHERN JUNCTION RAILWAY.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
[graphic]

Directors of the Great Eastern Railway.

[graphic][merged small]

In presenting this prospectus to the public, the General Credit and Finance Company 0t London beg to state that:

The Great Eastern Northern Junction Rai'wa Company is formed for the purpose of connecting London wit the northern coalflclds, and connecting the Eastern Counties and London with the manufacturing districts of Yorkshire and Lancashirs by a trunk line of practically level gradients for the cheaper transit of goods and minerals, and to give to the central parts of Lincolnshire railway accommodation. placing Bonnie, Sleaford, Lincoln. and Gainsborough and the intervening towns upon a trunk line of railway.

The Country extending from the east side of London. through Cambridge, l'etcrboroiigh. Lincoln, and Gainsbomugh to Doncaster, is one peculiarly ado tl-d for attaining easy 'rradients r and the existing Great Eastern main line. to ‘ambridge towards St Ives, it' continued by that route, would 0 n to the northern coalficlds of South Yorkshire, the West Ruling, and Durham, a highly improved means of transit for coal, While it would also give, by its councition with the manufacturing dist'icts of' Lancoshirc and Cheshire, through the Manchester, Shcmeld, and Lincolnsliire Railway, at Lincoln, and with the manufacturing districts of the Wcst Riding, by its connexion With the West Riding and Grimsby Railway leading to Wakefield, a cheaper transit for goods. and a more direct mass to the Victoria (London? Docks, and other places of transhipment, for ex oi'ts an imports through the port of London than is now urnislicd by the existing railways.

The Great Eastern Company have established a line of packets to the Continent, startin from Ilurwich to Rotterdarls daily, and by means of t lis service assengcrs and

s from the West Riding and from Lancas tire may reach tterdnm within the twenty-four hours

The resent Companv is formed to make a trunk line in extension of the Great Elstcrn main line through Cilllllll’itlitt, from Stanton, near St Ives, and proposes to pass through Ramsey, Pctcrborough, Dccpiug, Bourne, Polkinghlim, Sleaford, LIIICOID, and Gainsborough, to Done-aster and Askcrn, communicating at I’ctcrborongh, through the Great Eastern station, with the London and North Western, the \lidland and Great Northern Railways, l'ormingjunctions at Lincoln with the Great Northern, the Midland, the Manchester, Sheflield, and Linoolnshire, and at Gainsborough with the two latter companies, and forming junctions near Doncastcr and Asher-n with the West Riding and Grlmsby Railway, through which it will reach Wakefield, with the South Yorkshire. gaining access to the Great South Yorkshire coal field, with the Great Northern at. the Doncaster station, with the Lancashire and Yorkshire at Askern, and with the North Eastern for Hull, throuin the South Yorkshire Railway ut Thorne.

The line runs almost wholly through a level country, where the gtasients Will be quite flat, and iii the small portion where it encounters higher grounds the gradient Will be ltcpt within I to 400, so as to be practically level, and attain the object above alluded to of clrryirig, compared with other railways, double the present load of goods and minerals With the same tractive power.

The Compan has made arrangements for the interchange of traffic to on from the West Riding of Yorkshire with the West Riding and Grimsby Railway Company.

The length of the line from Stanton, near St Ives, to Askcm Will be 108} miles.

, The several branches and connexions with existing lines on the route, and at the Northern termini, will require the construction of 2|} further miles.

The Company has made arrangements with the Great Eastern Railway Company. under which the Great Eastern agree to find halfthe capital, and to work and maintain and pay all revenue expenses of the line, when made, upon receiving as per cent, for working expenses.

The Great Eastern also agree to pay to a common fund 55 per cent. ofthc gross tram.- of the new line, and the same proportion of the gross amount earned up or the Gi'c.i' Eastern trunk line, between Stanton and London, from any trathc passing to or from the new railway.

Ont oi this fund the capital of the new Company Is to receive a minimum dividend of 5 per cent., without any limit as to IDSX‘IIIIIIII; but, subject to the payment of5 per cent., the earnings upon borli new and old hncs are to be divided upon a mileage.

The total costl-fthc new line between St Ives and Askern. with the c nnectinir branches, will be 1,500,0001.

The effect of lltt'SO arrangements with the Great Eastern will be that a truflic of 161. per mile pcr‘ chlt \vill tarnish an amount equal to the payment of the minimum dividend of 3 per cenL; u mileage receipt so small as to be absolutely certain.

Thus, practically, the shareholders are guaranteed a minimum dividend of bl. per cent. Without any limit as to the maximum.

The actual earnings upon the new line may be well calculated from the fact that the Great Northern system, comprisin'g 35I miles, of which orin one-half in trunk line, furnishes from all sources a Wart'ltly average of' upwards of £90, and the Great Eastern system of 663 miles, of which less than one-third is trunk line, furnishes upwards of fill per mile per week, and that no one of the trunk lines of thc kingdom running from the metropolis is. apart from the coflnteral and branch lines, earning less than £I00 per mile per week.

If the proposed trunk line only earned one-lialf'of the present average carnlngs of the whole Great Northern system, vis., £45 per mile per Week, it Would pay a dividend of above II percent. upon its capital. leaving a not profit to the Great Eastern of more than £84,000 a year from new tralllc passing over their existing line from Stanton Junction to London.

The annexed tables show the rapid increase of the dividends of the proposed Company, and of the profit to the Great Eastern Railway Company. on the expansion of the name, under the arrangement with that Company,

I

Result of the Working on £1,600,000 Expenditure.

Tradic per mile Dividend per Profit to Great Eastern per week. cent. Railway Company. .016 . .... ' £5 £15,000 '20 ....... .. 5 ......... 38,000 24 ....... .. 6 .......... .. 45.000 28 ....... .. 1 ......... 53,000 3‘) ....... .. 8 .......... .. 61,000 40 ....... .. IO 76.000 4‘ ....... .. II .......... .. 84.000

Suppose that ultimately the development of the trntilc re quires the expenditure of £2,000,000, viz—Share capitol, £1,500 00), and debentures, £500,000, the lollowinc table shows the result, calculating the interest on debentures at 4} per cent.;

Result of the Working on £2,000,000 Expenditure.

Dividend per Traffic per mile cent..(after Profit to Great Eastern per week. paying 4} er Railway Company. cent. on dcbcn ures). £16 ....... .. £4} ...... .. -— 20 ....... .. 5 .......... .. £15,000 21 ....... .. 5 .......... .. 33.000 2s ....... .. a} .......... .. 53.000 32 .... .. 6} .......... .. 01,000 86 ....... .. 7 .......... .. 69.000 40 ....... .. a} ...... 70,000 44 ....... .. 0y ......... 04,000

The public advantaccs resulting from the line maybe estimated fiom the fact that urc'luctlon of 2s. p_-r ton in "J" Price. of coal in Imndon involves a saving ofhiilf a million annually; that the saving In the tonnage ol goods will be at ltmat equil In amomit; that the whole of the Eastern Countles of England will be put In dirt-ct and unbroken communicallon with the northern coaltlelds and manufacturing districts; that those manufclurlog dlstrlcis will have opened to them a new and unbroken route to the continent, and that the main towns of the great county of Lincoln sell! be placed U‘I‘tn a through route, Its vast flurlcnltural produce carried direct to the northern and solillicrn markets at a reduced cost, and its passenger intercourse relieVed of the present delays and embarrassments.

Applications for shares to be made In the annexed form, which mint be left at the Oltlces of the General Credit and Finance Company of Landon (Limited), or at the B lIIkCI'\', Wllh Bdcriosit of 10s. per share on the number of shares applied for. No other payment will be required until nfltl' the [ltllsiI‘IK of the act, and the deposit. will be returned, after deducting expanses (not exceeding 55. per share), in the event of the failure of the bill.

Detailed prospectuses and plum. wth forms ofoppllcatlon for shares, may be obtained at the UlIlCt'll of the General Credltand Finance Company, 7 Lothbury, l£.C.i or of the Secretary of the Railway Company, at lin Great George street, Westminster.

[blocks in formation]

To the Directors of the General Credit and Finance Corn. patty 0! London (Limited), 7 Lollibury. Gentlemen,—-lluvingpald the sum of £-—-, being IOs. per share on shares, I request that shoes of £20 each in the. Great Eastern Northern Junction Railway Company may be allotted to me, and I hereby agree to acceptsuclt shares, or any le>s number that may llt‘ allotted to the, and to sign the subscription contract when required. I am, Gentlemen, your obedient Servant, Name in full ................. Alldrees . . . . . ... ............... Description .............. .... .. Uilltl .- s s s . . . s . s . s s - s s s s cellos sssssssss NOT£.—Tlll8 form of' application to be left at tl-e Bankers, or at the Offices of the General Credit and Finance Conipany,who will give a receipt for the deposit, to be alterwards exchanged for scrip.

[ocr errors]
[blocks in formation]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors]
[graphic]

slid other vetsions. By Jtssrrr IIAMBLETUN.
London : Trnbner and C0., 60 Paternoster row.

) IMMEL’S NEIV PERFUMED

t. VALENTINES.

S'I‘ VALENTINE'S I’ERFUMED GLOVES.

ltIiIMEl/S SACHE VALENTINE of the Language of Flowers, illustrating different flowers and sentiments, with appropriate quotations from Shukspcre and otltcr poets. Price ls.; sent by post for H SIRIIII'S.

RI MMEL, Perfumer by appointment to II.R.II. the Princess of Wales, 97 Strand, and 2H Cornhill, London.

[graphic]
[graphic][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

II. Bourne, after

[graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][graphic][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][graphic][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][graphic][merged small][merged small]
[ocr errors]

CLAVIS GYMNASII. Seventh Edition, adapted

[ocr errors]

THE .ETYMOLOGY and SYNTAX of the ENGLISH LANl-UAGE Explained and Illustrated. 8th Edition. Svo, 7s. 6d. cloth.

London: Simpkln, Marshall, and Co.

[graphic]

MIDDLE CLASS AND CIVIL SERVICE
EXAMINATIONS.

' TEIV and APPROVED TEXT-BOOKS I, on ENGLISH HISTORY, constructed specially for [he use of Pupils preparing for Public Examinations, with copl~u~~ Biogi-ilphlcal and Constitutional Notes, Examination Questions, .tc., Determier for Examinees, but- not to be f and In any other School Histories. By llr ltosxa'r Ross, Lecturer on Iltsiory, Normal College, Cheltenharn.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]

Just published, 8m, cloth, price 7s. , MANUAL of RELIGIOUS INSTRUC

i TION. Ily Annnur Revues, D.D., Pastor at Rot

mutant, and Author of ‘Crilical Studies on the Gospel

according to Saint Motthew,‘ a work crowned by " The

Hague Society for the Deli-nee of the Christian Religion.‘ London : Sintpkin, Marshall, and Co.

[graphic][ocr errors]

HE YOUNG HOUSLVVIFE'S DAILY ASSIS'I‘AN I on all Matters relating to Cookery and Housekeeping: COfltrtlltlltg Bills of Family Fare for Every Day in the Year; which include Breakfast and Dinner for a butt!“ Family, and Dinner for Two Servants. Also, Twelve Bills ot I-‘are for Dinner Parties, and Two for Evenin; Entertainments, with the Cost annexed. By Cal

[graphic]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

Iron.
London; Simpkin, Marshall, and Co.

[graphic]

Now ready at all the Libraries, crown Svo, price 10s. 6d.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][graphic][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]
[graphic]

of ENGLISH

[graphic]

Now Ready, One Shilling, ( No. 50) the

ORNHILL MAGAZINE for FEBRUARY. With Illustrations by J. E. Mtntars, R.A., and It. BAIIII. In Memoriam.

[ocr errors]
[ocr errors]

HE QUARTERLY RE VIEW,
No. CCXXIX, is published THIS DAY.

COSTA-LIFTS; China. New Euglanders, and the Old Home. l'orsyth's Life of Cicero. IV. Guns and Plates. V. Spi-ke's 'I‘ruvels on the Nile. VI. Eels. VII. Home in the Middle Ages. VIII. The Danish Duchics.

John Murray, Albemarle street.

(With an Illustra

[graphic]

I. II. III.

[graphic]
[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
« AnteriorContinuar »