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“ Thou art no judge how well I know my trade, proud Lord ! but some day or other perhaps thou mayest remember Lushee's words; there are many ways of deceiving—thou'lt learn that to thy cost.” Away with

you,

child !" cried Lord Mowbray peevishly, as he threw her another crown;

begone."

“ She is an amusing little black-eyed thing," said Colonel Pennington ; “ it is quite pitiable to see such a child in the ways of destruction.”

“ Puir bit lassie!” said Miss Macalpine, " it makes me wae to see sic an a bonnie bairn sae ill guided; she'll no be a weel doing ; I fear, you

“ Guided !” repeated - Lord Mowbray, who misunderstood her Scotch dialect : “ I should never have imagined she was guided at all."

Gereral Montgomery now approached the group; and Lu hee Lovel ran to her grandfather, and appeared to be whispering in his ear an account of her proceedings with Lady Emily, and her warning to Lord Mowbray, The old man broke off from her, saying with an air of command, " Tshib, Tshib !” and, approaching within a respectful distance, seemed to wish to speak again with the General.

“Well, have you any thing more to say ?" asked General Montgomery, as he observed him still lingering ere he departed !-" what is it?"

“ Honoured Sir! in the press of other matters, I had forgotten a boon I would fain ask: there are certain sheep of your's have died in the western pasture, there; and your people know not what to make of them. Eat them they will not, and to bury them they are afraid, for the dogs will harrow them up again. Give them, General, if it please you, to Corrie ; they'll serve him and his people for a feast. I might have taken them, or have bought them for the carrying them away, but Corrie knows his duty too well to touch aught of your's save with especial leave ; not a bit of wool would be disturbed from off their backs, but with your consent, honoured General, by me or mine.”

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Corrie Lovel waited for his answer, while General Montgomery looked around with astonishment.—“Why, Lovel, the sheep, if dead, as you say, are your's; and I shall thank you, as my people will too, for their removal; but in truth we ourselves are fearful in such cases how to dispose of them, lest their disease should spread. But are you in earnest, man? You will not eat of them, surely, unless you lack other food indeed, and then

6 We think not that which God kills is un. clean," replied Lovel," and we love the flesh that bleeds not by the knife.” A feeling of horror appeared to pervade the whole party as Corrie Lovel urged his request; and General Montgomery, putting a piece of gold into his hand as he ascended the steps, recommended him to provide a festival for his people with it, rather than from that which he proposed.

Lady Emily, as she re-entered the hall, felt her spirits depressed ; and though her natural good sense rejected the idea of attaching importance to any mysterious words that had

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fallen from Lushee, yet their import left an uncomfortable impression on her mind, and she wished more than once that she had remained with Frances in the library. The idea of Rose, and the misery of her family, again recurred to her; and she determined to visit their cottage, though with faint hopes of finding its inmates more at peace than she had left them.

With this intention, instead of following the party back to the library, Emily equipped herself for her walk ; and hastening through the garden, and across the chase, soon reached the objects of her anxiety. Her worst fears were but confirmed by what she learnt from the Delvins ; Rose was not at home; but her wretched parents represented her as remaining still the same unmoved and hard creature that she had shown herself since the first of this miserable affair ; and the old couple assured Lady Emily that it required their utmost forbearance, and the strongest recollection that she was their child, to withhold them from turning her into the street.

Their agony of tears, when speaking of the

rebellious and ungrateful Rose, was more than Emily could bear; and taking the old woman's hand and pressing it kindly, she rushed from their cottage little less agitated than themselves. “ Tell Rose,” she said as she left them,

-“ tell Rose, I desire her to come to me at the hall to-morrow morning at ten o'clock: I must

see her.”

With a slow and pensive step, and a heavy heart, Lady Emily trod her way home. For the heart of Emily was sensibly alive to the joys or the sorrows of humanity; the tenderness of her nature, unseared and uncontaminated by the world, led her readily to participate in the weal, or to sympathise in the woe of her fellow creatures, and she could become the ministering angel, or the blithe companion, as occasion demanded :-ever prompt to dispense comfort or promote happiness in others, herself the happiest, in proportion as she was the means of diffusing contentment around her.

As she ascended the terrace-steps, she observed General Montgomery in close conversation with Mr. Aldget; and her own anxiety

VOL. I.

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