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FINE ILLUSTRATED WORKS

ON

NATURAL HISTORY.

Now in progress or recently published.

Details on application.

SHARPE'S HIRUNDINIDÆ, OR FAMILY OF SWALLOWS, coloured plates.

Twelve Parts now ready (complete in 17 or 18) price 10s. 6d. each nett. SANDER'S REICHENBACHIA, OR ORCHIDS ILLUSTRATED AND

DESCRIBED, magnificent coloured plates. Twenty-one Parts now ready (complete in 48)

price 78. 6d. each nett.

NOW COMPLETE: GOULD'S BIRDS OF NEW GUINEA AND THE PAPUAN ISLANDS, with 320 magnificent hand-coloured plates. Twenty-five Parts,

price £3 3s. each nett. JUST PUBLISHED: ASIATIC BIRDS, selected from the “BIRDS OF ASIA of the late John

Gould; Fifty-four magnificently coloured plates, with descriptions, impl. folio, half morocco extra, gilt edges.

price £12 12s. nett.

Complete in one volume, 4to cloth, with numerous woodculs, by

J. G. MILLAIS and others : SEEBOHM'S GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF THE PLOVERS,

SANDPIPERS, SNIPES, AND THEIR ALLIES. price £2 12s. 6d. nett THE SAME, additionally illustrated with COLOURED PLATES by KEULEMANS.

price £5 5s. nett. SEEBOHM'S HISTORY OF BRITISH BIRDS, with COLOURED ILLUSTRATIONS of their EGGS (besides woodcuts). Six Parts royal 8vo.

price £6 6s. nett. BULLER’S BIRDS OF NEW ZEALAND, numerous fine coloured plates. Thirteen Parts 4to.

price £12 12s. nett.

MR, GOULD'S GRAND ORNITHOLOGICAL AND OTHER

WORKS: A complete descriptive Catalogue of this Series (the most remarkable ever produced in the annals of Natural History) consisting of 43 volumes imperial folio, containing 3158 hand

coloured plates, will be sent post free on application.

The Advertisers would also call particular attention to their

SECOND-HAND STOCK as being especially rich in all classes of Works on NATURAL HISTORY.

LIBRARIES PURCHASED.

London : 136, Strand, W.C. and 36, Piccadilly, W.

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ATURE NOTES, the Selborne Society's Magazine, is

intended to be a record of progress-progress in the love of Nature, in the knowledge of natural objects,

and in the war to be waged in defence of the beauties. of Nature against their more or less avowed exterminators.

One main object of the Magazine (which will be kept steadily in view by the Editors) is to establish a connecting link between uninstructed love of Nature and accurate scientific knowledge. Those who know most are not always those who love most; but additional knowledge will certainly increase the pleasure of those who are already Nature-lovers, i.e., Selbornians. Accordingly, the articles in the Magazine will not be of a technically scientific nature, but the writers will seek to combine accuracy of statement with a popular style. Such topics will be chosen as are likely to interest the ordinary reader, who is not a trained botanist or zoologist, but wishes to learn more about the Flowers, Birds, and Insects, which attract his attention in his daily walks, if he lives in the country, or which have caught his eye in his holiday rambles, if he is one who passes most of his time " in populous city pent."

It is believed that a large number of interesting observations, made by those who use their eyes for the purpose of Naturestudy, are lost, because the observers do not think what they have noticed is of sufficient value to be worthy of record in any scientific Journal. We may hope that Nature Notes will do much to utilise such observations and to collate the experience of various observers,

Records of the Earliest Leafing and Flowering of Plants, and the time when the last flowers are seen, will be inserted. A useful little Handbook for those who wish to compile such a calendar is “ The Naturalists' Diary,” by Mr. Roberts.

own.

Careful observations on the Migrations and other Habits of Birds will be given, and authentic records of such habits are invited.

The question of the injurious and beneficial agency of Insects in Field and Garden will be dealt with, and an attempt will be made to discriminate carefully and justly between the friends and foes of mankind.

Not only are animals and piants disappearing from various parts of our land, but the quaint old legends concerning them, the ancient superstitions which throw so much light on Comparative Mythology, the fanciful, and often poetical Local Names—all these, valuable almost as the subjects they commemorate, are rapidly dying out. We shall endeavour to secure what still lingers of this mass of old-world tradition, and shall receive with gratitude communications from those who will note down provincial names of birds and plants and the folk-lore, perpetually vary. ing, and yet essentially the same, which has clustered round the animal and vegetable kingdom. In this connection we shall be led occasionally to refer to the work done by the Folk-lore Society and by the Society for the Preservation of Ancient Monuments. These Societies are in spirit closely akin to our

We have the same foes to contend with, and many tastes in common. The man who loves every stone of the old abbey, beautiful even in its ruins, and reverently garners the legends of its ancient fame, will strive to preserve also the trees and flowers that gather round its walls, and the birds that have found in its desecrated altars " a nest where they may lay their young."

Not only will local English names be examined and their etymology discussed, but articles on the Derivation and Pronunciation of Scientific Names, will be occasionally given. There are few subjects which yield a more abundant crop of popular errors to be eradicated and replaced by correct information.

Biographies of Naturalists will be introduced now and again, and it is not unlikely that some of our members may supply valuable information concerning the lives of half-forgotten worthies of time past.

At the suggestion of Prof. Flower (Director of the Natural History Department, British Museum), a series of short papers is projected on "How to use the Natural History Museum for NatureStudy.” In these papers there will be a full description of the various type collections and of several other additions recently made to the Museum for the purpose of facilitating elementary study. Similar aids to the use of the Museums at Kew are hoped for, from Mr. J. R. Jackson, the Curator of the Museums.

The Allusions to Plants and Flowers which occur in our great Poets will be noticed ; and a series of articles is planned dealing with some of those masters of song who have found their highest inspiration in the reverent study of natural beauty, “knowing that Nature never did betray the heart that loved her."

“Young Selborne" will certainly not be forgotten, and a

OUR PROGRAMME.

3

Children's Column will be devoted to the instruction of juvenile Selbornians. Their queries will obtain special attention, and plain directions will be given by which they may gather knowledge, as well as amusement, from every hedgerow and wayside pond.

Reviews of Books which bear on the various branches of Natural History will appear, and the Editors will always be glad to give information as to books suitable for any particular study.

If funds permit, suitable Illustrations will occasionally be given. In this matter we have been promised the advice and assistance of Mr. G. C. Haité, the well-known artist, and author of “ Plant-studies,” to whom we owe the appropriate design on the cover of the magazine.

In addition to the various departments enumerated above, NATURE Notes, as the Official Organ of the Selborne Society, will give authentic accounts of the proceedings of the Central Council, as well as reports of any meetings of the Branches to which exceptional interest is attached.

Notices of Work done and work which requires to be doneof destruction threatened to some beautiful spot, of destruction happily averted by energetic Selbornians, or devastation most unhappily effected by ruthless evictors of Nature from her ancient seats—all these things will be recorded for the encouragement or admonition of those who have the interests of the Society at heart.

Abstracts of Scientific Reports bearing on the destruction of the fauna or flora of certain districts, or on the ravages wrought by too fertile foreign weeds, will find a place in our pages.

It will be part of our duty to keep an eye on Legislative Measures which affect the objects that we are pledged to support. NATURE Notes will be a medium by which supporters may be rallied for the advancement of good measures and stout resistance offered to bad ones.

Correspondence on all matters which lie within the scope of the Selborne Society's Programme will be inserted. A free expression of opinion is invited, but it is hardly necessary to remind our readers that no personalities or remarks reflecting upon individuals can be admitted.

If funds are available, Prizes will be offered for the best Coloured Sketches of Plants or Birds in situ, and also to the winners in other competitions which may be arranged by the Council.

Answers to Queries on all subjects which can fairly be considered to come within our province will be given, and practical suggestions afforded to those who are desirous of engaging in the pursuit of any branch of Natural History.

In the accomplishment of the various objects which have been detailed, the Editors have been promised the assistance of writers of eminence in every department of Natural History,

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including some of the best authorities on the Botany, Entomo-
logy and Ornithology of the British Isles. The gentlemen who
are connected with the Natural History Department of the
British Museum, and with the Royal Gardens, Kew, have been
especially kind in their readiness to help. Communications
are expected in early numbers from some of the following: -
EDMUND J. BAILLIE, F.L.S.; Rev. D. W. BARRETT, M.A.;
ANTHONY BELT; Hon. Mrs. R. C. BOYLE; Miss A. M. BUCKTON;
G. B. BUCKTON, F.R.S., F.L.S.; Sir MOUNTSTUART E. GRANT
DUFF, G.C.S.I., F.R.S.; ALFRED EAST, R.I.; Prof. FLOWER,
C.B., F.R.S., LL.D.; Rev. H. D. GORDON, M.A.; G. C. Haité,
F.L.S.; G. HARLEY, M.D., F.R.S.; FRANCIS GEORGE HEATH;
W. B. HEMSLEY, F.R.S., A.L.S.; Walter E. P. Hogg ; Prof. F.
E. Hulme, F.L.S., F.S.A.; Robert HUNTER; J. R. JACKSON,
A.L.S.; EDWARD KING; W. F. KIRBY, F.Z.S.; Rev. C. T.
MILLARD, M.A.; G. R. M. MURRAY, F.L.S.; G. A. MUSGRAVE,
F.Z.S., F R.G.S.; GEO. NICHOLSON, A.L.S.; J. L. OTTER; Rev.
H. RAWNSLEY, M.A.; R. BowDLER SHARPE, F.L.S.; H. J.
Slack, F.R.M.S.; WORTHINGTON G. SMITH, F.L.S.; HENRY
Smith; G. B. SOWERBY, F.L.S.; Prof. Trail, M.A., M.D.,
F.L.S.; T. F. WAKEFIELD; Miss ANNIE WALLIS; Rev. H. C.
WHITE, B.A.; F. N. WILLIAMS, F.L.S.

Enough has been said to show that much thought has been taken how best to meet the wants and wishes of Selbornians. But after all, it is upon the Members of the Society that the success of the undertaking depends; and to them we confidently appeal to give every aid in their power to secure a wide circulation and high position for NATURE Notes, the Selborne Society's. Magazine.

THE INTRODUCTION OF FOREIGN WEEDS.

BY GEORGE NICHOLSON, A.L.S.

Curator of the Royal Gardens, Kew.
HE paragraph from Herschell, which Mr. Hewett Cottrell

Watson chose as the motto for his famous 66 Cybele
Britannica," indicates, with characteristic clearness,

the spirit in which he himself worked, and might well be taken as a guiding principle by those who wish to follow in the footsteps of that eminent observer of nature. ro? here is scarcely any well-informed person who, if he has but the will, has not also the power, to add something essential to the general stock of knowledge, if he will only observe regularly and methodically some particular class of facts which may excite his attention.or which his situation may best enable him to study with effect.” Another writer, a well-known local botanist, Mr. T. R. Archer Briggs, of Plymouth, in a paper entitled

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