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WILLIAM WESLEY & SON,
Scientific Booksellers & Publishers,
28, Essex Street, Strand, LONDON.

Just Published: Parts 1 & 2, 4to, 6 coloured plates, 5s. each part, post free. NORTH AMERICAN BIRDS, by H. Nehrling. To be completed in 12 parts, containing 36 coloured plates, after Water-colour Drawings by Robert Ridgway, A. Goering, and Gustav Muetzel. 1889.

"Your work is far more satisfactory than other works which have come before me professing more than they performed. Your pages bear evidence of careful and enthusiastic observation and study of our birds, and, while containing much having that value to science which always attaches to records of original observation, is, at the same time, by no means too technical for bird lovers who are not ornithologists. There is an out-of-doors' atmosphere to your pen-pictures, a flavour of the woods and fields, which cannot fail to be appreciated by all who appreciate Nature."-E. P. BICKNELL of the American Ornithologists' Union.

Crown 8vo, with one Plate, Cloth (published 3s. 6d.), 2s. 6d.

THE HOUSE SPARROW, by J. H. Gurney, jun., Col. C. Russell, and Dr. Elliott Coues. 1885.

CONTENTS:-The House Sparrow, by an Ornithologist,-J. H. Gurney, jun. The House Sparrow, by a Friend of the Farmers,-Colonel C. Russell. The House Sparrow in Yarrell's British Birds. The Sparrow in our Bill of Fare. The English Sparrow in America, by Dr. Elliott Coues. A Ruffian in Feathers, by Olive Thorne Miller.

Recently published, each post free on receipt of the price.

NATURAL HISTORY & SCIENTIFIC BOOK CIRCULAR:
Containing a priced list of W. WESLEY & SON's stock of Scientific Works.
No. 98. Ornithology, Mammalia, Faunas and Geography. (Over 1,000 works),

price 4d.

W. WESLEY AND SON, 28, ESSEX STREET, STRAND, LONDON.

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MONOGRAPH OF THE BRITISH CICADE OR TETTIGIIDÆ.

(FROGHOPPERS AND GRASSFLIES.)

By GEORGE BOWDLER BUCKTON, F. R.S., Corr. Memb. Acad. Nat. Hist. of Philadelphia,
Memb. de la Soc. Ent. de France. Illustrated by more than 400 Coloured Drawings.
In Eight Parts. Demy 8vo. 8s. a Part. Part IV., completing Vol. I., now ready.

No coloured monograph of the British Cicada exists, and it is even believed that no adequately illustrated monograph exists of European species. Partly to meet this want, it is proposed to publish eight quarterly parts, each containing on an average ten litho-chromo plates and letterpress, illustrating the forms, metamorphoses, general anatomy, and the chief details connected with the life-history of this family of insects. The work will contain also short diagnoses of all the British species, about 230 in number, most of which have come under the author's notice, each species being illustrated by one or more coloured drawings. Some account will be given of the curious myths and tales told by ancient Greek and Latin poets, and descriptions will be appended relating to the curious sound-organs possessed by some species, and other subjects connected with the economy of this interesting but difficult group of Rhynchotous insects. Mr. Buckton's name is well known to entomologists, and this book represents the labour and observation of many years.

LONDON.

MACMILLAN & CO.,

SEELEY & Co., Limited, Essex St., Strand.

THE

PORTFOLIO.

An Artistic Periodical. Edited by P. G. HAMERTON. Published Monthly,
price Half-a-Crown.

the year of its

the

Publishers have decided to take the beginning of the year 1890 as a convenient opportunity for the introduction of several important improvements.

The text will be printed in a larger and handsomer type. The double columns will be abolished, except in the case of the ART CHRONICLE, which will be so paged that when the volume is bound it can be placed consecutively at the end.

The new page will afford opportunities for the introduction of ornamental initial letters (which the narrow column did not admit), headpieces and tailpieces, copied from good examples, or expressly designed. As it will contain somewhat less matter than before, the number of pages will be proportionately increased.

The INDUSTRIAL ARTS of the present day will receive fuller notice than hitherto.

The wrapper will bear a new device, and the cloth binding will be improved in colour and design. These alterations will contribute to the noble appearance of the yearly volume. An illustrated prospectus may be obtained from the publishers.

Now is the time to subscribe.

THE PORTFOLIO VOLUME FOR 1889

IS NOW READY, containing 36 plates and about 150 minor Illustrations. Price 35s., cloth, gilt edges; or 42s., half morocco.

LONDON: SEELEY & CO., LIMITED, ESSEX STREET, STRAND.
READY.

NOW

The Clergy List for 1890

(FORTY-NINTH YEAR),

Containing a Complete List of the Clergy of England, Wales, Ireland, Scotland, and the Colonies.

Fully Corrected and Revised up to the time of going to press.

Price 10s. 6d.

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KELLY & CO., 51, Great Queen Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields, W.C. Nature Notes; the Selborne Society's Magazine.

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Periodicals, and Magazines.

JOHN BALE & SONS, Steam Printers, 87-89, Great Titchfield Street, W.

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Booksellers & Publishers,

INCLUDING

GOULD'S ORNITHOLOGICAL WORKS AND OTHER WORKS IN NATURAL HISTORY.

Second-hand Book

Department.

OLD AND SECOND-HAND BOOKS.The Stock is now, as it has been for many years, of unusual extent and variety, and is receiving constant additions. A Monthly Catalogue has now been issued for over forty years. Specimen Number gratis. Complete General Catalogue, large Svo. (pp. 380), cloth, price 3s. 6d., post free.

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Book Department.

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O EXECUTORS, SOLICITORS, & OTHERS :-The Advertisers, who have the largest Stock of Second-hand Books in London, are at all times prepared to INSPECT, VALUE and PURCHASE LIBRARIES or smaller Collections of BOOKS either in Town or Country, and to give the utmost value in cash. Experienced Valuers promptly sent.

REMOVALS WITHOUT TROUBLE OR EXPENSE TO SELLERS. Telegraphic Address :-Bookmen, London.

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STANDARD BOOKS AND NEW PUBLICATIONS. All the Standard Works, particularly those necessary for an English Library, together with the new books issued by the leading publishers, are kept constantly in stock.

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Mature Notes:

The Selborne Society's Magazine.

No. II.

NOVEMBER 15, 1890.

VOL. I.

THE INFLUENCE OF THE ENVIRONMENT UPON PLANTS.

N the first number of the Selborne Magazine I very briefly sketched a theory of the Evolution of Plants, differing widely from that which is connected with the name of Mr. Darwin. Since that time I have published a volume in the International Scientific Series on the subject, and have secured the adhesion of a large number of naturalists in our own country and abroad. I now lay the following account of my views before the readers of NATURE NOTES with the hope that some of the many Selbornians who are in the habit of carefully studying nature, may be able to supply some facts which will confirm the hypothesis I have suggested. I shall be equally obliged to those who will give an account of observations which appear to contradict it; as my object is not to defend a theory at all hazards, but by continual investigation to ascertain the truth.

Let me first give in a sentence or two the main points on which all evolutionists are agreed; I shall refer only to the vegetable kingdom. Concerning it the evolutionary belief may be briefly summed up as follows: it was thought at one time that all species of plants were fixed entities, and admitted of no, or at least very little change; so that "varieties" were restricted and never transcended the limits of the characters by which the species was recognisable—that the latter were, in fact, specific creations. A more extended study of plant life has shown that these views are quite untenable, and that all plants have descended from pre-existing ones by "descent with modification," as it is called.

Now, if one has become satisfied that evolution is the only interpretation of existing life, the question arises: How have plants become changed? A very obvious phenomenon is that

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