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THE CLASSIC FRENCH READER
FOR ADVANCED STUDENTS;

OR,
BEAUTIES OF THE FRENCH WRITERS, ANCIENT AND MODERN.

BY ADAM DE FIVAS.
With a Vocabulary, French and English, of all the words and Idioms

contained in the Work. By J. L. JEWETT.

One Volume, 12mo of 390 pages. Price, $1. “This work is a continuation of the Series beginning with Ollendorff's French Grammar; and embraces selections from the writings of all the literary periods, and specimens of the various styles of the most distinguished writers. It is a well-digested book, convenient as a manual for students, since it unites the advantages of a reading book, lexicon, and grammar, and will be highly prized by those who are acquainted with the preceding publication of the Series."

NEW ELEMENTARY FRENCH READER.

AN

INTRODUCTION TO THE FRENCH LANGUAGE:

CONTAINING

Fables, Select Tales, Remarkable Facts, Amusing Anecdotes, etc.

WITH

A DICTIONARY
OF ALL THE WORDS, TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH,
By M. DE FIVAS, Member of several Literary Societies.

One neat volume, 12mo. Price 50 cents. This work has passed through five editions in England, and rapidly found its way as a classbook into the most eminent public and private seminaries.

The pieces contained in this volume comprehend a great variety of subjects, and are generally of a lively and familiar style, the phrases will serve as elements of conversation, and enable the student to read with facility other French books.

In the Dictionary at the end, is given the meaning of every word contained in the book.

The explanatory words are placed at the end of the book, instead of at the foot of the page; by this method learners will derive considerable benefit.

Though this work is designedly for the use of schools, the author has borne in mind, that many of the learners of French are adults, therefore, while it is adapted for youthful students, an endeavor has also been made to make it acceptable to those of more advanced age.

GESENIUS' HEBREW GRAMMAR. Fourteenth Edition, as Revised by Dr. E. RODIGER. Translated by T. J. CONANT,

Professor of Hebrew in Madison University, N. Y.
With the Modifications of the Editions subsequent to the Eleventh, by Dr. DAVIES,

of Stepney College, London, To which are added, A COURSE OF EXERCISES IN HEBREW GRAMMAR, and a HEBREW CHRESTOMATHY, prepared by the Translator. One handsomely printed vol. 8vo. Price $2.

Extract from the Translator's Preface. " The fourteenth edition of the Hebrew Grammar of Gesenius is now offered to the public by the translator of the eleventh edition, by whom this work was first made accessible to students in the English language. The conviction expressed in his preface to that edition, that its publication in this country would subserve the interests of Hebrew literature, has been fully sustained by the result. After a full trial of the merits of this work, both in America and in England, its republication is now demanded in its latest and most improved form."

THE

STANDARD PRONOUNCING DICTIONARY

OF THE

IN

FRENCH AND ENGLISH LANGUAGES.

TWO PARTS. PART I. FRENCH ANL ENGLISH.-Part II. ENGLISH AND FRENCH. The First Part comprehending words in common use – Terms connected with ScienceTerms belonging to the Fine Arts—4000 Historical Names—4000 Geographical Names-1100 tərms lately published, with the PRONUNCIATION OF EVERY WORD, according to the French Academy and the most eminent Lexicographers and Grammarians; together with 750 Oritical Remarks, in which the various methods of pronouncing employed by different authors are invest tigated and compared with each other.

The Second Part containing a copivus vocabulary of English words and expressions, with the pronunciation according to Walker.

THE WHOLE PRECEDED BY A Practical and Comprehensive System of French Pronunciation.

By GABRIEL SURENNE, F. A. S. E., French Teacher in Edinburgh; Corresponding Member of the French Grammatical Society

of Paris, &c., &c. Reprinted from a duplicate cast of the stereotype plates of the last Edinburgh edition.

One stout volume, 12mo., of nearly 500 pages. Price $1 50.

A FEW CRITICAMS ON ITS MERITS.

Kinderhook Academy, April 7, 1347. Sur inne's French Dictionary is a many respects superior to those of " Meadow" and Boyer."'. The Proper Names at the bottom of each page, and the method of explaining the prononciation, (by the French sounds of the vowels, with which the pupil has become familias,) ure in my opinion distinguishing excellences.

SILAS METCALF.

Princeton, Dec. 13, 1847. We use habitnally the admirable Dictionary of Surenne.

LYMAN COLEMAN.

National Mayazine. “This work must have been one of very great labour, as it is evidently of deep research. We vave given it a careful examination, and are perfectly safe in saying, we have never before seen any thing of the kind at all to compare with it. Our space will not permit us to give more than this general testimony to its value. Long as the title is, and much as it promises, our examination of the work proves that all the promises are fulfilled, and we think that no student of the French anguage should, for a moment, hesitate to possess himself of it. Nor, indeed, will it be found less useful to the accomplished French scholar, who will find in it a fund of information which can nowhere be met with in any one book. Such a work has for a long time been greatly needed, and Mr. Surenne has supplied the deficiency in a masterly style. We repeat, therefore, our well ligested opinion, that no one in search of a knowledge of the niceties of the French langnage shculd be without it."

New York Observer. “Every student of the French language, and every person of taste who is fond of reading French, and wishes to become proficient in tbat tongue, should possess this comprehensive but complete dictionary. It embraces all the words in common use, and those in science and the fine arts, historical and geographical names, etc., with the pronunciation of every word according to the French Academy, together with such critical remarks as will be useful to every learner. It is published in a form of extreme condensation, and yet contains so full a compilation of words, definitions, etc., as scarcely to leave any thing to be desired.'

Boston Courier. This is, we believe. the first French pronouncing dictionary that has appeared in the English field of French education, and the compiler, Mr. Surenne, may well felicitate himself on the de cided success which has attended his efforts to furnish us with this long expected desideratum Mr. S. has rendered precise what was before uncertain, clear what had hitherto been obscure, in short, put into the hands of both teachers and scholars, an authority in philology and pronun ciation, as good, as correct, as anthoritative as Johnson. Walker, or Webster , in the English tongue. The method adopted for representing the sounds of words, is for the English or Americas eye rnd ear, so that faultless pronunciation may be depended upon. The phraseology is often that of the French Academy, consequently of the highest authority, and is both copious and nractical The English pronuuciation is precisely after the plan of Webster, imitated or followed with the most scrupu,ous accuracy, thus giving two extraordinary aavantages in one work, viz., a diction ary of French pronunciation, with words and meanings, and a standard of English pronunciation We exhort, we entreat teachers, parents, guardians, all interested in the education of youth, te look at this splendid work of industry and ingenuity, and they will see and recognize its sa; riority at a glance.

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OLLENDORFF'S NEW METHOD

OF LEARNING TO READ, WRITE, AND SPEAK

THE ITALIAN LANGUAGE.
With Additions and Corrections by Felix Foresti, Prof. of the Italian Language in Columbia

College, New York City. One volume, 12mo. 81 50.
KEY TO THE EXERCISES.

One vol. 12mo. 75 cts.

United States' Gazette. “ OLLENDORFF'S ITALIAN GRAMMAR.– The system of leaming and teaching the living languages by Ollendorff is so superior to all other modes, that in England and on the continent of Europe, scarcely any other is in use, in well-directed academies and other institutions of learning, To those who feel disposed to cultivate an acquaintance with Italian literature, this work will prove invaluable, abridging, by an immense deal, the period commonly employed in studying the language.”

ACCOMPANIMENT TO OLLENDORFF'S ITALIAN GRAMMAR.
CRESTOMAZIA ITALIANA:

A COLLECTION OF
SELECTED PIECES IN ITALIAN PROSE,

DESIGNED AS A
CLASS READING BOOK FOR BEGINNERS

IN THE STUDY OF
THE ITALIAN LANGUAGE.

BY E, FELIX FORESTI, LL. D.,
PROFESSOR OF THE ITALIAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE IN COLUMBIA COLLEGE
AND IN THE UNIVERSITY OF THE CITY OF NEW-YORK.

One volume, 12mo. Price $1. “ The Italian Reader is compiled by Mr. Foresti, Professor of the Italian Language in the Columbia College and the University of New York. It appears to be designed to follow the study of Ollendorff's Jtalian Grammar, on which work many correct judges have pronounced that no important improvement can well be made. In making selections for the book before us, Mr. Foresti has preferred modern Italian writers to the old school of novelists, historians, and poets. In this he has done a good thing; for the Italian Reader contains the modern language. True. there are some innovations, some changes which many would deem a departure from original purity, but nevertheless it is the language which one finds and hears spoken in Italy. These changes have gone on under the eye and against the stern authority of the Academy della Crusca. and in their magnificent new dictionary, new in process of publication, they have found themselves compelled to insert many words which are the growth not only of modern necessity, but of caprice.

* The selections in the Italian Reader are from popular authors, such as Botta, Manzoni, Machiavelli, Villani, and others. They are so made as not to constitute mere exercises, but contain distinct relations so complete as to gratify the reader and engage his attention while they instruct. This is a marked improvement on that old system which exacted much labor without enlisting the sympathies of the student. The selections from Manzoni, for example, are from the “ Promessi Sposi," one of the noblest works of fiction ever issued from the press-a work so popular as to have gone through an incredible number of editions in Italy, while it has been translated into every language of Europe. There have been, we believe, no less than three distinct English translations made, two of which were done in this country. The Reader contains six extracts from this novel, among which are the beautiful episodes of Father Cristoforo and the Nun of Monza, and a description of the famine and plague of Milan in the year 1630. The account of the plague rivals the celebrated one of Boccacio in his Decameron. The idioms that occur in the selections are explained by a glossary appended to each. The Italian Reader can with confidence be recommended to students in the language as a safe and sure guide. After mastering it, the Italian poets and other classicists may be approached with confidence."... Savan nah Reprblican.

75 cts.

OLLENDORFF'S NEW METHOD OF LEARNING TO READ, WRITE, AND SPEAK

THE GERMAN LANGUAGE. Reprinted from the Frankfort edition, to which is added a Systematic Outline of the different Parts of Speech, their Inflection and Use, with full Paradigms, and a

complete List of the Irregular Verbs.

BY GEORGE J. ADLER, A. B., Professor of German in the University of the City of New-York. One volume, 12mo. $1 50.

I A KEY TO THE EXERCISES, in a separate volume.

“ OLLENDORFF's new method of Learning to Read, Write, and Speak the German Lan. grage, with a systematic outline of German Grammar, by George J. Adler, is one of those rare works which leave nothing to be desired on the subjects of which they treat. The learner's dif. ficulties are so fully and exactly provided for, that a constant sense of satisfaction and progress is felt from the beginning to the end of the book. A bare inspection of one of the lessons will satisiy any one acquainted with the elements of German grammar, that it adapts itself perfectly to his wants. With the systematic outline of grammar by Prof. Adler, the new method is subsantially perfect, and it is probably second in its advantages only to residence and intercourse with educated Germans."

“ The study of the German is becoming so essential a part of an ordinary education, that every work tending to facilitate the acquisition of the language should be welcomed. An American édition of Ollendorff has been much wanted. His system is based upon natural principles. He teaches by leading the student to the acquisition of phrases, from which he deduces the rules of the language. The idioms are also carefully taught, and the entire construction of the system is such that, if adhered to with fidelity and perseverance, it will secure such a practical knowleilge of the German as can be acquired by no other mode, so rapidly and thoroughly. We heartily commend the book to all who really wish to understand a tongue which contains so inany treasures.

A PROGRESSIVE GERMAN READER,

PREPARED WITH REFERENCE TO
OLLENDORFF'S GERMAN GRAMMAR,
WITH COPIOUS NOTES AND A VOCABULARY,

BY G. J. ADLER,
Professor of the German Language and Literature in the University of the City of N. Y.

One volume, 12mo. $1. The favorable reception which Ollendorff's German Grammar has received from the Ameri. can public, has induced the Publishers and the Editor to comply with the very general demand for a German Reader.

The plan of this Reader is as follows, viz. :

1. The pieces are both prose and poetry, selected from the best authors, and are so arranged as to present sufficient variety to keep alive the interest of the scholar.

2. It is progressive in its nature, the pieces being at first very short and easy, and increasing in difficulty and length as the learner advances.

3. At the bottom of the page constant references to the Grammar are made, the difficult passages are explained and rendered. To encourage the first attempt of the learner as much as possible, the twenty-one pieces of the first section are analyzed, and all the necessary words given at the bottom of the page. The notes, which at first are very abundant, diminish as the learner advances.

4. It contains five sections. The first contains easy pieces, chiefly in prose, with all the worde necessary for translating them; the second, short pieces in prose and poetry alternately, with copious notes and renderings; the third, short popular tales of Grimm and others; the fourth select ballads and other poems from BÚERGER, GOETHE, SCHILLER, UHLAND, SCHWER, CHA: MISSO, cc.; the fifth, prose extracts from the first classics.

5. At the end is added a VOCABULARY of all the words occurring in the book.

JUST READY,
THE PRACTICAL GERMAN GRAMMAR;
OR, A NATURAL METHOD OF LEARNING TO READ, WRITE, AND SPEAK

THE GERMAN LANGUAGE.
By CHARLES EICHHORN. One volume, 12mo.

A DICTIONARY GERMAN AND ENGLISH LANGUAGES,

OF THE

INDICATING THE ACCENTUATION OF EVERY GERMAN WORD, CONTAINING SEVERAL HUNDRED GERMAN SYNONYMS, TOGETHER WITH A CLASSIFICATION AND ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE IRREGULAR VERDS, AND A DICTION

ARY OF GERMAN ABBREVIATIONS. COMPILED FROM THE WORKS OF HILPERT, FLÜGEL, GREIB, HEYSE,

AND OTHERS.

IN TWO PARTS:
I. GERMAN AND ENGLISH--II, ENGLISH AND GERMAN.

BY G. J. ADLER, A. M.,
Professor of the German Language and Literature in the University of the

City of Nero-York.

One large volume, 8vo, of 1400 pages. Price $5. Strongly and neatly bound.

Extract from the Preface. In preparing this volume, our principal aim was to offer to the American student of the German a work which would embody all the valuable results of the most recent investigations in German Lexicography, and which might thus become not only a reliable guide for the practical acquisition of that language, but one which would not forsake him in the higher walks of his pursuit, tu which its literary and scientific treasures would naturally invite him. The conviction that such a work was a desideratum, and one which claimed immediate attention, was first occasioned by the steadily increasing interest manifested in the study of the German by such among us as covet a higher intellectual culture. as well as those who are ambitious to be abreast with the times in all that concerns the interests of Learning, Science, Art, and Philosophy.

In comparing the different German-English Dictionaries, it was found that all of them were deticient in their vocabulary of foreign words, which now act so important a part not only in scientific works, but also in the best classics in the reviews, journals, newspapers, and even in conversational language of ordinary life. Hence we have endeavoured to supply the desired words required in Chemistry, Mineralogy, Practical Art, Commerce, Navigation, Rhetoric, Grammar, Mythology, both ancient and modern. The accentuation of the German words, first introduced by Hernsius, and not a little improved by Hilpert and his coadjutors, has also been adopted, and will be regarded as a most desirable and invaluable aid to the student. Another, and it is hoped not the least, valuable addition to the volume, are the synonyms, which we have generally given in an abridged and not unfrequently

in a new form, from Hilpert, whu was the first that offered to the English student a selection from the rich store of Eberhard, Maas, and Gruber. Nearly all the Dictionaries published in Germany having been prepared with special reference to the German student of the English, and being on that account incomplete in the German-English part, it was evidently our vocation to reverse the order for this side of the Atlantic, and to give the utmost possible completeness and perfection to the Gerinan part. This was the proper sphere of our labor.

Morning Courier and New-York Enquirer. The Appletons have just published a Dictionary of the German Language, containing English names of German words, and German translations of English words, by Mr. ADLER, Professor of German in the University of the City of New-York.

In view of the present and rapidly increasing disposition of American students to make themselves familiar with the Language and Literature of Germany, the publication of this work seems especially timely and important. It is in form a large, substantial octavo volume of 1400 pages, beautifully printed in clear and distinct type, and adapted in every way to the constant services for which a lexicon is made. The purpose aimed at by the editor cannot be more distinctly stated than in his own words, quoted from the preface, in which he states that he sought “to embody all the valuable results of the most recent investigations in German Lexicography, so that his work might thus become not only a reliable guide for the practical acquisition of that language, but one which would not forsake him in the higher walks of his pursuits, to which its literary treasures would naturally invite him.” All who are in any degree familiar with German, can bear with ness to the necessity that has long been felt for such a work. It is needed by students of the language at every stage of their progress. None of those hitherto in use have been satisfactory—the best of them, that published in Philadelphia, in 1845, lacking very many of the essentials of a reliable and servicable lexicon. From a somewhat close examine tion of its contents, we are satisfied that Mr. Adler's Dictionary will be universally re garded as the best extant. Its great superiority lies in its completeness, no word in any department of science or literature being omitted. We cannot doubt that it will becomo at once the only German lexicon in use throughout the countrv.

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