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CATALOGUE

OF

SCHOOL AND COLLEGE

TEXT-BOOKS.

COMPRISING

I. GREEK, LATIN, &c. II. FRENCH, GERMAN, SPANISH, AND ITALIAN.

III. ENGLISH (HISTORIES AND MISCELLANEOUS).

PUBLISHED BY

D. APPLETON & COMPANY,

200 BROADWAY, NEW-YORK,

AND

GEORGE S. APPLETON,

164 CHESNUT-ST., PHILA.

ARNOLD'S CLASSICAL SERIES.

I.

A FIRST AND SECOND LATIN BOOK AND PRACTICAL GRAMMAR. By Thomas K. ARNOLD, A. M. Revised and carefully

Corrected, by J. A. Spencer, A. M. One vol. 12mo., 75 cts.

II, LATIN PROSE COMPOSITION: A Practical Introduction to Latin Prose Composition. By THOMAS K. ARNOLD, A. M.

Revised and Corrected by J. A. Spencer, A. M. 12mo., $1.

III.

FIRST GREEK BOOK; With Easy Exercises and Vocabulary. By Thomas K. ARNOLD, A. M. Revised and Cor.

rected by J. A. Spencer, A. M. 12mo., 63 cts.

IV. GREEK PROSE COMPOSITION: A Practical Introduction to Greek Prose Composition. By Thomas K. ARNOLD, A. M.

Revised and Corrected by J. A. Spencer, A. M. Ono vol. 12mo., 75 cts.

V.

GREEK READING BOOK,
For the Use of Schools; containing the substance of the Practical Introduction to Greek Con

struing, and a Treatise on the Greek Particles, by the Rev. THOMAS K. ARNOLD,
A. M., and also a Copious Selection from Greek Authors, with English
Notes, Critical and Explanatory, and a Lexicon, by

J. A. Spencer, A. M. 12mo., $1 50

VI.

CORNELIUS NEPOS;
With Practical Questions and Answers, and an Imitative Exercise on each Chapter. By
Thomas

K. ARNOLD, A. M. Revised, with Additional Notes, by Prof. Johnson,
Professor of the Latin Language in the University of the City of
New-York. 12mo. A new, enlarged edition, with

Lexicon, Index, &c., $1. "ARNOLD'S GREEK AND LATIN SERIES.-The publication of this valuable collection of classical school books may be regarded as the presage of better things in respect to the mode of teaching and acquiring languages. Heretofore boys have been condemned to the drudgery of going over Latin and Greek Grammar without the remotest conception of the value of what they were learning, and every day becoming more and more disgusted with the dry and unmeaning task; but now, by Mr. Arnold's admirable method-substantially the same with that of Ollendorff-the moment they take up the study of Latin or Greek, they begin to learn sentences, to acquire ideas, to see how the Romans and Greeks expressed themselves, how their mode of expression differed from ours, and by degrees they lay up a stock of knowledge which is utterly astonishing to those who have dragged on month after month in the old-fashioned, dry, and tedious way of learning languages.

“Mr. Arnold, in fact, has had the good sense to adopt the system of nature. A child learns his own language by imitating what he hears, and constantly repeating it till it is fastened in the memory; in the same way Mr. A. puts the pupil immediately to work at Exercises in Latin and Greek, involving the elementary principles of the language-words are supplied--the mode of putting them together is told the pupil-he is shown how the ancients expressed their ideas; and then, by repeating these things again and again-iterum iterumquethe docile pupil has them

indelibly impressed upon his memory and rooted in his understanding.

“The American Editor is a thorough classical scholar, and has been a practical teacher for years in this city. He has devoted the utmost care to a complete revision of Mr. Arnold's works, has corrected several errors of inadvertence or otherwise, has rearranged and improved various matters in the early volumes of the series, and has attended most diligently to the accurate printing and mechanical execution of the whole. We anticipate most confidently the speedy adoption of these works in our schools and colleges."

Arnold's Scries of Classical Works has attained a circulation almost unparalleled, being introduced into nearly all the Colleges

and leading Educational Institutions in the United States.

ARNOLD'S CLASSICAL SERIES.

OPINIONS OF SCHOLARS

From A. B. Atkins, Baltimore. “ I have introduced Arnold's First and Second Latin Book as a Text-book in my institution, my classes have already made great proficiency; indeed I cannot express in too high terms my admiration of the Series; it is the only method of teaching the classics, and no books have ever been published which seem to be su admirably adapted to teach Latin and Greek as they."

From E. S. Dirwell, Public Latin School, Boston. “I have caused both Arnold's Greek and Latin Prose Composition,' as well as · Arnold's First and Second Latin Book, to be introduced into this School, which is the best proof of the estimation in which I hold them."

From William A. Ely, University of Michigan. “I have made considerable use of 'Arnold's Latin Book, Cornelius Nepos,' and 'Greek Reader,' &c., in my Classes, and can from experience say that they are the best Text-books of the kind with which I am acquainted.'

GENTLEMEN,-In reply to your letter, I have to say that I can, from the most satisfactory experience, bear testimony to the excellence of your series of Text-Books for Schools. I am in the daily use of Arnold's Latin and Greek Exercises, and consider them decidedly superior to any other Elementary Works in those Languages.

LYMAN COLEMAN, D. D.,
Prof. of the German, Greek, and Latin Languages, Princeton.

DEAR SIR,–I am much pleased with Arnold's Latin Books. A class of my older boys have just finished the first and second books. They had studied Latin for a long time before but never understood it, they say, as they do now.

CHAS. M. BLAKE,
Classical Teacher in Brown's Prince-street Academy, Philadelphia.

After having in constant use since their first appearance Arnold's Series of both Latin and Greek Books, my experience enables me confidently to pronounce upon their unrivalled merits. I state, without fear of contradiction, that, even with greater labor and pains on the part of the teacher, equal progress cannot be made without as can be with them. And they succeed admirably in awakening an interest in the pupil, and in making a lasting impression upon his memory. It is an application of Bacon's principle for forming an accurate man.

R. B. TSCHUDE,
Prof. of Ancient Languages, Norfolk, Va.

ARNOLD'S LATIN AND GREEK COMPOSITION. In the skill with which he sets forth the idiomatic peculiarities, as well as in the directness and simplicity with which he states the facts of the Ancient Languages, Mr. Arnold has no superior. I know of no books so admirably adapted to awaken an interest in the study of language, or so well fitted to lay the foundation of a correct scholarship and refined taste.

N. WHEELER,
Principal Worcester County High School.

From N. W. Benedict, A. M., Prof. of Languages in the Rochester Collegiate Institute.

GENTLEMEN, I am under obligations to you by D. Hoyt for a copy of Arnold's First and Second Latin Book, and for a copy of Arnold's Greek Reading Book. Other volumes of Arnold's Series have been forwarded to me; and after a careful examination of the works, directed more particularly to their plan, I am convinced of their superior merits and have introduced them into the Institute. I am specially pleased with the kind of help afforded in his Cornelius Nepos, which is such as to give the student a critical and accurate understanding of the text, and at the same time to stimulate his mind to greater exertion to apprehend the beauties of the lan. guage. The plan is designed and well adapted to make the knowledge obtained the property of The scholar.

Extract from a Report of an Examination of the Male Department of the Parochial School of

St. Paul's Church, Rome, N. Y. it would be that upon · Arnold's First Book in Latin. Many an Academician, who has studied * "But were we to single out

any part of the examination as worthy of special notice, Latin in the ordinary way for two years, could not sustain an examination as did the lads of this class, who have studied Arnold's First Lessons only about six months. Arnold's method is admirable for making thorough scholars and accurate grammarians.”

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