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Timbs, John

LACONICS;

OR

SA

INSTRUCTIVE MISCELLANLES,

SELECTED
FROM THE BEST AUTHORS,

Ancient and Modern.

[graphic]

# A maxim is sometimes like the seed of a plant which the soil it is thrown
into must expand into leaves and flowers, and fruit; so that a great part must
be written as it were by the reader."

BY A GENERAL READER.

PHILADELPHIA:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM BROWN.

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TO THE READER.

MANY volumes on a similar plan with this have been published in America, as well as Europe. The best of these (now out of print) passed through several editions, but appeared without the names of the authors attached to the selections, and much of the pleasure of perusing them was thus lost. Care has been taken in this volume to affix the name of the author, or of the book from whence the extract was taken, whenever it was practicable.

Few books of its size can be found comprising an equal fund of interest and instruction-however small, it is not one of those which should be perused at a sitting; but on the contrary, it may be occasionally resorted to, and never without affording something to amuse or instruct, a flash of genius, or a useful precept to guide and adorn

life.

EDITOR.

op It forms a suitable parsing book for schools.

MISCELLANÍES.

" And join both profit and delight in one."

CREECH's HORACE.

SCHOLAR.-The life that is devoted to knowledge passes silently away, and is very little diversified by events. To talk in public, to think in solitude, to read and to hear, to inquire and answer inquiries, is the business of a scholar. He wanders about the world without pomp or terror, and is neither known nor valued but by men like himself.-Rasselas.

EPITAPH ON THE POET GAY,

In Westminster Abbey, 1732.
In manners gentle; of affections mild;
In wit a man; simplicity a child;
With native humour tempering virtuous rage,
Proud to delight at once and lash the age;
Above temptation in a low estate,
And uncorrupted e'en among the great;
A safe companion and an easy friend,
Unblam'd thro' life, lamented in thy end.
These are thy honours! Not that here thy bust
Is mix'd with heroes or with kings thy dust-
But that the worthy and the good shall say,
Striking their pensive bosoms, here lies Gay.

Pope.

WRITING.-Among all the productions and inventions of human wit, none is more admirable and useful than writing, by means whereof a man may copy out his very thoughts, utter his mind without

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