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There has been increase in all kinds of wilt and blight, both of which are spread by insects, principally the melon and cucumber crops, by the twelve-spotted ladybug.

There is a slow, but persistent advance of the grasshopper tribe, regarded throughout the world as the most destructive of all insects. Many gardens have been destroyed by grasshoppers, and in a few instances, fields of corn. In my opinion a grasshopper (or locust) outbreak is threatened in the State.

Not to prolong the list, there has been an undeniable increase in the number of all destructive insects.

The CAUSE.

This increase is due to lack of insect-eating birds. For a century the useful birds of the State have been ruthlessly destroyed until their numbers are far below what is required to control insects. This condition will be intensified by the diversification of farming, now becoming universal, since more and better food is being grown for insects. So long as only a few staple crops are grown, only such insects as fed on these crops could multiply. The rest barely existed or did not exist at all, within the State. The chinchbug and the potato beetle have both come in from outside.

THE REMEDY.

The obvious remedy is to institute such protection as will insure the multiplication of useful birds, and as far as possible this should be done without impairing the liberty of the citizen. The passage of a Bill, laying a small license on hunters, would be sufficient to afford protection, and at the same time conserve the liberty of the citizen.

Almost universal experience has shown that a license of one dollar for each hunter will raise sufficient revenue to enforce law. The amount is too small to interfere with individual liberty. It is hoped that such a Bill will be enacted into law by the General Assembly and receive the Governor's approval.

FIELD WORK.

The total amount received from fines and licenses during the year has been $1.943.50. The Chief Game Warden has been without salary or contingent fund.

There has been a total of 49 convictions; 25 from killing nongame birds ; 20 for trespass and hunting out of season; and 4 for hunting without license.

A financial report has been filed with the State Treasurer as required by law.

The co-operation of your Excellency and of the Honorable members of the General Assembly is earnestly desired and invoked.

JAMES HENRY RICE, JR.,

Chife Game Warden.

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON ELECTION OF CLERKS.

Mr. LIDE presented the following:

Under the Senate Resolution of the 15th instant, the Chairmen of the Committees on Local Legislation, Banking and Insurance, Manufactures, Incorporations and Claims, have selected Mr. John G. Galbraith as Clerk of the Committees as provided in such Resolution.

Mr. CARLISLE announced the election of Mr. C. H. Glaze as Clerk of the Judiciary Committee.

Mr. HARDIN announced the election of Mr. W. S. Miller, Jr., as Clerk of the Finance Committee. Mr. APPELT announced the election of Messrs. L. W. Green and

Allen as Clerks for the Railroad and Education Committees jointly.

The PRESIDENT announced the appointment of Alex. Tennant as special Page as provided in the Resolution.

PETITION PRESENTED.

Mr. HALL: Presented by sixty-five operatives and parents residing at Cherokee Falls, S. C., requesting the Legislature to leave unmolested the present child labor law.

TIME FIXED.

Mr. LANEY moved that when the Senate adjourns it stand adjourned to meet Monday at 8 p. m., which motion was adopted.

ADJOURNMENT.

At 12:10 p. m. the Senate, on motion of Mr. LIDE, adjourned.

MONDAY, JANUARY 20, 1913.

The Senate assembled at 8 p. m., the hour to which it stood adjourned, and was called to order by the PRESIDENT.

The roll was called, and, a quorum answering to their names, the PRESIDENT announced the Senate ready to proceed to business.

The proceedings were opened with prayer by the Chaplain, Rev. C. A. Freed.

The Clerk proceeded to read the Journal of yesterday, whereupon, on motion of Mr. Sharpe, the further reading of the Journal was dispensed with.

The PRESIDENT called for Petitions, Memorials, Presentments of Grand Juries and such like papers.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS.

The following Bills and Resolutions were introduced:

S. 34.—Mr. SHARPE: A Bill to prohibit the use of the words "bank or banking" by any person or persons engaged in business other than a legalized banking corporation, and to provide punishment thereof.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Banking and Insurance.

S. 35.--Mr. APPELT: A Bill to prohibit Magistrates from permitting the compromise of criminal cases after warrants have been issued, except in cases of simple assault and battery.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

S. 36.- Mr. CARLISLE: A Bill to define what alcoholic drinks and beverages may be sold in this State.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Police Regulations.

S. 37.--Mr. CARLISLE: A Bill to prevent city officials from accepting free service, free tickets or franks of any kind from a public service corporation.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

S. 38.-Mr. CARLISLE: A Bill to amend Section 2662, Code of Laws, 1912, so as to enlarge the borrowing powers of directors.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

S. 39.-Mr. CARLISLE: A Bill to enable Inman School District, No. 26, to collect a contingent fee under certain conditions.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Finance.

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S. 40.—Mr. HOUGH: A Bill to exempt medical examiners of life insurance companies from license fees.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Banking and Insurance.

S. 41.-Mr. KETCHIN: A Bill to amend Section 3 of an Act entitled "An Act to authorize the county boards of the various counties to appropriate money out of the general county funds, to be used in co-operation with State officials having charge of live stock sanitary work and United State Department of Agriculture eradication of cattle ticks and infectious diseases of live stock, etc.”

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Local Legislation.

S. 42.-Mr. PATTERSON: A Bill to repeal an Act entitled An Act to provide for rural policemen in the county of Barnwell," approved February 17, A. D. 1911.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Local' Legislation.

S. 43.- Mr. GOODWIN: A Bill to amend Section 608, Volume II, Criminal Code of 1912, relating to numbers on motor vehicles.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

GENERAL ORDERS.

THIRD READING BILLS.

S. 4.-Mr. Appelt: A Bill to provide for rural policemen for Clarendon county.

The bill was read the third time.

Mr. APPELT proposed the following amendment, which was adopted:

Amend Section 4, line 7, by inserting the word "so" after the word "directed" and before the word "to."

There being no further amendments, the Bill was passed and ordered sent to the House of Representatives.

SECOND READING BILLS.

The following Bills and Joint Resolutions were severally read the second time, passed, and ordered placed upon the calendar for a third reading, with notice of general amendments :

S. 16.-Mr. Beamguard: A Bill to exempt certain citizens of King's Mountain and Bethel townships, in York county, from the tax levies of 1912.

S. 21.--Mr. Sharpe: A Bill to repeal an Act entitled "An Act to provide for Road Inspectors for Lexington county and define their duties," approved February 3, 1911.

AMENDED

S. 18.- Mr. Carlisle: A Bill to amend Section 185 of the Code of Laws of South Carolina, 1912, Volume II (Code of Civil Procedure), relating to publication of summons.

The Bill was read and the amendments proposed by the Committee were adopted, to wit:

Amend by inserting the word "such" before the word "service" on line 3, page 2.

Amend, further, by inserting the word "such" between the words “when" and "service" on line 11, page 8.

Insert the words “to a purchaser" between the word “judgment" and the word "in" on line 13, page 12.

Insert the word "any" between the word "having" and the word “interest” on line 11, page 13.

Strike out the word "held" and insert the word "had” on line 6, page 14.

There being no further amendments, the Bill was passed and ordered placed upon the Calendar for a third reading, with notice of general amendments.

S. 22.-Mr. Carlisle: A Bill further regulating the powers and duties of grand juries.

The Bill was read and the amendments proposed by the Committee were adopted, to wit:

By adding after the word "Solicitor," line 1, page 2, the words “except when making their final presentment."

There being no further amendments, the Bill was passed and ordered placed upon the Calendar for a third reading, with notice of general amendments.

MESSAGES FROM THE GOVERNOR.

Mr. JOHN K. AULL, Private Secretary to His Excellency, the Governor, appeared upon the floor of the Senate and presented the following:

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