Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub

blooded American citizen—and only a few who are not, and they are not far from us. What I say here I am responsible for on the streets. I often walk the streets of Columbia by myself. I go to the office at 10 o'clock and stay until 2, and go back about 4 and stay until such hour in the evening as the business will permit me to leave. I do not hide behind the Governor's office to say or do anything. I am personally responsible for every word I say, and those who think otherwise will find themselves mistaken, if they will simply make up their minds and get the courage and backbone to resent an insult.

But I have endeavored to wipe the slate clean and I shall start my new administration as Governor, forgiving everything that has been done against me in the past; because I am taught that if I want forgiveness I must forgive. I have wiped the slate clean. Those whose duty it is to come to the Governor's office will receive the kindest treatment. Those representatives of the people who have recommendations to make--their recommendations, unless there be some good reason given to the contrary, will receive proper consideration. I hope to serve the people as they would have me serve. But, undrstand, gentlemen, if I am struck I propose to strike back, and say to the man who strikes, "Lay on, Macduff, and damned be him who first cries, hold, enough."

Tell your people, please, when you go back home, that you saw, at five minutes past one o'clock, on the 21st day of January, 1913, the happiest man that God Almighty has ever created. I worked from 1890, as an humble member of this House, until the 17th of January, 1911, to be Governor of my State. That was the height of my ambition. I could have retired at the end of my first term and truly said to my people that they had given me all I wanted. But when I was told that I could not be re-elected, I proposed to show some astute politicians that they did not know what they were talking about. But, standing before you today, having had my term as Governor endorsed, I have received the highest honors that can be given any man. I would rather be Governor of South Carolina than to have any other position in the world, except the presidency of the United States, and that I do not have the slighest idea of ever having. But, gentlemen, if one of your Senators were to resign today, and you were unanimously to elect me to serve you in the Senate of the United States, I would thank you and decline, because I can do more for my friends as Governor than I can in any other capacity. Therefore, I say to you that I start the new administra

tion, having attained the highest ambition of my life, perfectly satisfied at its end, or, if it please God, in the midst of it, to retire forever and forever from public life, and go back to old Newberry. And when the day shall come that I shall meet my father in heaven, on that great Judgment Day I can look him in the face and say, "Father, I promised you on your dying bed that I would be Governor of South Carolina, and I am here on this day of final judgment to tell you that I was Governor of South Carolina, and that I kept the faith." Then I shall have finished my work; I shall be ready to retire.

As a final word, gentlemen, I hope that you will have a pleasant session; I hope it will be a session full of good for the people of our State; that we may join hands and work together in one common cause—the upbuilding and the uplift of the people of our grand old Commonwealth-and that when our lives have been finished, and we shall be called to the other world, you and I, and all of us, may be able to stand and join in the great acclaim, “Praise God from whom all blessings flow," and with that great heavenly host, have our part in the glad and glorious song of praise,

"All hail the power of Jesus' name;

Let angels prostrate fall;
Bring forth the royal diadem,

And crown Him Lord of all.”

SENATE RETURNS.

At 1:15 p. m., the Senate returned to the chamber from the House of Representatives.

ADJOURNMENT. At 1:20 p. m., the Senate, on motion of Mr. LANEY, adjourned.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1913.

The Senate assembled at 12 m., the hour to which it stood adjourned, and was called to order by the PRESIDENT.

The roll was called, and, a quorum answering to their names, the PRESIDENT announced the Senate ready to proceed to business.

The proceedings were opened with prayer by the Chaplain, Rev. C. A. Freed.

The Clerk proceeded to read the Journal of yesterday, whereupon, on motion of Mr. EPPS, the further reading of the Journal was dispensed with

The PRESIDENT called for Petitions, Memorials, Presentments of Grand Juries and such like papers.

INTRODUCTION OF BILLS.

The following Bills and Resolutions were introduced:

S. 63.--Mr. WESTON: A Bill to establish an additional township in Richland county.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Local Legislation.

S. 64.—Mr. APPELT: A Bill to authorize the Paxville High School, of School District No. 19, Clarendon county, to charge and collect a contingent fee of pupils attending said school.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Finance.

S. 65.--Mr. MARS: A Bill to regulate the sale of refused and unclaimed freight, and to repeal Sections 2610 to 2613, inclusive, of Volume I, of the Code of Laws of South Carolina, 1912, relating thereto.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Railroads.

S. 66.—Mr. EARLE: A Bill to abolish the estate of dower in this State.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

S. 67.-Mr. CLIFTON: A Bill to amend an Act entitled "An Act to provide for an election on the sale of alcoholic liquors and beverages in certain counties petitioning therefor,” by changing the time and requirements for holding said elections.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Police Regulations.

S. 68.—Mr. GOODWIN: A Bill to amend Section 454, Volume I, Code of Laws, 1912, relating to penalty on delinquent taxes.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

S. 69.-Mr. CROUCH: A Bill to require telegraph companies to maintain an office and agent at certain towns and cities.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Railroads.

S. 70.--Mr. CROUCH: A Bill to authorize the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund to lend funds to Saluda county.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Finance.

S. 71.--Mr. CROUCH: A Joint Resolution to require the payment of $185.90 to C. J. Ramage as Special Judge.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Finance.

S. 72.—Mr. CROUCH: A Bill to repeal an Act entitled "An Act to require the County Supervisors of Newberry and Saluda counties to establish and maintain a free ferry across Saluda River at Holly's Ferry,” approved the 16th day of February, A. D. 1911.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Roads, Bridges and Ferries.

S. 73.—Mr. GOODWIN: A Bill to amend Section 470, Volume I, Code of Laws, 1912, relating to fees and charges for collecting delinquent taxes.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

S. 74.—Mr. KETCHIN: A Bill to amend Section 3786, of the Code of Laws of 1912, relating to testamentary guardian.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

S. 75.—Mr. MARS: A Bill to amend Section 2644, Volume I, Code of Laws, 1912, relating to the duty and power of Bank Examiners.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

S. 76.-Mr. BUCK: A Bill to amend Section 1451, Volume I, Code of Laws, South Carolina, 1912, so as to provide for the appointment of a Magistrate at Myrtle Beach, in Horry county.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Local Legislation.

S. 77.-Mr. MANNING: A Bill to amend Section 504, Volume II, Code of Laws, 1912, relating to enticing laborers under contract.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

S. 78.—Mr. STRAIT: A Bill to fix the amount of pensions to be paid to each person enlisted in the War Between the States and their widows.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Finance.

S. 79.-Mr. CARLISLE: A Bill to amend Section 8 of an Act entitled "An Act to regulate the holding of elections for the Commission Form of Government in cities of over four thousand inhabitants, and to provide for the adoption of said form of government in cities of over ten thousand and less than twenty thousand inhabitants," etc.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

S. 80.-Mr. CLIFTON: A Bill to fix the time of holding the Courts of the Third Judicial Circuit.

Without reference.

S. 81.-Mr. WILLIAMS: A Bill to abolish the Highway Commission for Aiken county and to provide a system of county government for said county.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Local Legislation.

S. 82.-Mr. HALL: A Bill providing that the Board of Public Works of Gaffney, S. C., may pay the premium on their bonds out of funds coming into their hands from the public works.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Finance.

S. 83.-Mr. PATTERSON: A Bill to amend Section 3745, of the Code of Laws of South Carolina, 1912, Volume I, relating to marriage licenses.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Judiciary.

S. 84.-Mr. HALL: A Bill to authorize the Trustees of School District No. 10, Cherokee county, the State of South Carolina, to issue bonds for school purposes.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Finance.

S. 85.—Mr. SULLIVAN: A Bill to place all interurban railroads, whether propelled by steam, electricity or other power, under the jurisdiction of the Railroad Commission.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Railroads.

S. 86.-Mr. BANKS: A Bill to provide free tuition to all students attending Clemson College.

Read the first time and referred to the Committee on Education.

S. 87.-FINANCE COMMITTEE: A Bill to amend Section 137, of Volume I, of the Code of Laws of 1912, by striking out the words "Section 135" and inserting in lieu thereof the words "Section 136" wherever the same occur in said section.

Without reference.

REPORTS OF STANDING COMMITTEES.

Mr. HARDIN, from the Committee on Finance, submitted an unfavorable report on

S. 9.—Mr. Carlisle: A Bill to make an appropriation to the Medical College of the State of South Carolina, and to provide for scholarships in said county.

On motion of Mr. HARDIN, the unfavorable report was adopted and the Bill rejected.

Mr. HARDIN, from the Committee on Finance, submitted a report that it be referred to the Judiciary Committee, on

« AnteriorContinuar »