Imagens das páginas
PDF
ePub

LUDOVIC ESTES, A. M.

Thesis-Latitude of Detroit Observatory : Determination by the method of the Zenith

Telescope. Subjects for examination : Major-Astronomy. Minors-1. Mathemetics. 2. Physics.

STEPHEN FRANCIS WESTON, A. B.

Thesis-The Ethics of the Church Fathers and Modern Ethics. Subjects for examina

tion : Major-Ethics. Minors-1. Philosophy. 2. Political Economy.

CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS.

LAURA DONNAN, A. B.

Thesis-Duties of a Private Citizen in a Republic. Subjects for examination :

Major-Constitutional History of the United States. Minors-1. Latin. 8. English Literature.

ESTELLA LOIS GUPPY, A. B.

Thesis—Emerson and Plato. Subjects for examination : Major-Greek. Minors-1.

Logic. 2. History.

GEORGE FRANCIS JAMES, A. B.

Thesis-Rousseau and the Emile. Subjects for examination : Major-Pedagogics.

Minors—1. English Dramatic Literature. 2. Psychology.

GEORGE CULLEY MANLY, A. B.

Thesis-Labor Organizations as a Factor in Distribution. Subjects for examination :

Major-Political Economy. Minor-1. Constitutional History of the United States. 2. Constitutional History of England

HANNAH ROBIE SEWELL, A. B.

Thesis—The Engiish Poor Law. Subjects for examination : Major-Constitutional

History of England. Minors-1. English Literature. 2. German,

MARGARET STEWART, A. B.

Thesis-Chemical Changes in Precipitates without Solution. Subjects for examina

tion : Major-Analytical Chemistry. Minors-1. Organic Chemistry. 2. Latin.

CANDIDATE FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF PHILOSOPHY.

ELVIN SWARTHOUT, PH. B.

Thesis—The Doctrine of the Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions of 1798, and their

Subsequent Effect upon the Constitutional History of the Union. Subjects for examination : Major-Constitutional History of the United States. Minors—1. Taxation. 2. Constitutional History of England.

CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE.

SHIGEHIDE ARAKAWA, B. AGR.

Thesis-Mental Health : Its Relation to National Prosperity. Subjects for examina

tion : Major-Sanitary Science. Minors-1. International Law. 2. History of Education.

FREDERICK GEORGE Novy, B. S.

Thesis-Cocaine and some of its Derivatives. Subjects for examination : Major

Organic Chemistry. Minors-1. Physiological Chemistry. 2. Physiology.

UNDERGRADUATES, CANDIDATES FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF

ARTS ON THE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM.

EPHRAIM DOUGLASS ADAMS.

Thesis–Our Credit System. Subjects for examination : Major--Political Economy.

Minors-1. German. 2. History.

HELEN LOUISA LOVELL.

Subjects for examination : Major-Groek. Minors-1. Physics. 2. Philosophy.

ALPHONSO GERALD NEWCOMER.

Subjects for examination : Major—Greek, Minors—1. Latin. 2. Philosophy.

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF VISITORS. HON. JOSEPH ESTABROOK,

Superintendent of Public Instruction. SIR:— The undersigned, members of the State Board of Visitors to the University, take pleasure in reporting that a careful examination disclosed nothing in the management which in our judgment is subject to adverse criticism.

The reports which are made from time to time by the Board of Regents, and by the President, also, and which show business ability, broad culture and eminent scholarship combined with an earnest purpose to keep the University in the front rank of great schools of learning, give all the information that is required for a full understanding and appreciation of the work that is being done.

The semi-centennial anniversary, also, did much to call the attention of the citizens of the State and the friends of liberal education elsewhere to its power and usefulness.

As the pressing wants of the University have been so faithfully and eloquently urged in detail by those who know best what is required, we do not need to mention them only in a general way.

The “call for larger equipment" is constant, but it should always be kept in mind that this is the result of prosperity; and, if the University is to grow and do the best work, its wants must be supplied. There should be an Art building constructed with architectural fitness, The various laboratories in which so much good work has already been done should not be crippled by lack of funds, but should be furnished with all the materials, instruments, and instructors required to secure the greatest results. The present corps of teachers, working together to accomplish the objects for which the institution was founded, are a guarantee of thorough instruction to the extent that their means will allow. But the steady and generous care of the State is required to keep it in the list of "great Universities"; and we cannot refrain from expressing an earnest conviction that the present appropriations are inadequate to insure the position that its past and present services merit, and the welfare of the State imperatively demands.

It is no less a pleasure than a duty to report a general condition of affairs and management in keeping with the ideas of the most advanced educators as to the practical as well as purely literary instruction that should be furnished by a University, planned wisely and broadly enough for the needs of the whole people and to be the head of the educational interests of the State.

GEORGE B. BROOKS, FRANCIS B. STOCKBRIDGE, WM. A. MOORE.

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION.

ANNUAL REPORT.

To the Superintendent of Public Instruction :

SIR—The State Board of Education submits the following report for the year ending September 30, 1887:

STATE NORMAL SCHOOL.

Under the able management of Principal Sill the school has continued to prosper, and both in the matter of attendance and the character of the work done the record for the year has been satisfactory.

The imperative need for larger accommodations had become so apparent that at the last session of the legislature a special appropriation of $60,000 was made for the erection and furnishing of an addition to the Normal School building, Work upon the new building is well under way, and it is expected to be completed by the close of the next school year. With the increased facilities which will be thus afforded, the capacity of the school will fully meet the demande upon it and the opportunities for more efficient work will be greatly enlarged.

The liberal action of the legislature in considering the needs of the school has enabled the board to provide for the erection of a library building and a new boiler house, improvements which have long been needed. The report of the Principal given herewith furnishes a very comprehensive review of the work of the school during the year.

EXAMINATION QUESTIONS.

Under the provisions of Sec. 2, Act No. 231, Public Acts of 1879, the Board prepared examination questions for the regular examinations held by the County Examiners in October, 1886, and March, 1887, and also for special examinations on the last Friday in November, the last Friday in February, the second Friday in March, the last Friday in April, and the last Friday in May. The boards of most of the counties adopted the above dates for special examinations and used the questions prepared by the State Board.

By the provisions of Sec. 4, Act No. 266, Public Acts of 1887, the duty of preparing questions is transferred to the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and hereafter the Board will be relieved of this duty.

STATE CERTIFICATES.

Under the provisions of Act No. 231, Public Acts of 1879, the Board issued the following circular:

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION,

18..}

State certificates are granted to teachers of approved qualifications, in accordance with Section 1, of Act No. 231, Laws of 1879, which reads as follows:

The People of the State of Michigan enact, That the State Board of Education shall hold stated meetings, at which they shall examine, and may grant State certificates of qualification to, such teachers as may, upon a thorough and critical examination, be found to possess eminent scholarship and professional ability, and shall furnish satisfactory evidence of guod moral character. Said certificate shall be signed by the President and the Secretary of the Board and impressed with the seal thereof; and shall entitle the holder to teach in any of the schools of the State, without further examination, and shall be valid for the term of ten years, unless revoked by said Board. Each applicant for examination shall, on making application, pay to the Secretary of the Board five dollars as an examination fee."

The State Board of Education, in order to carry into effect the provisions of this law, will require of each applicant for a certificate :

1. Written testimonials from responsible persons as to the moral character of the applicant ;

2. Testimonials from present and former employers as to success in teaching ; 3. A statement over the applicant's signature, of the length of time he has taught.

The application, accompanied with the examination fee, together with satisfactory evidence relative to character, length of time taught, and success in teaching, should be furnished at least ten days before the first day of the examination. Any one whose credentials are unsatisfactory will be promptly informed of that fact, and thereby be saved the expense of attendance upon examination.

Papers forwarded as testimonials must in all cases be originals. When copies are sent for filing in this office the originals will be returned, but not otherwise.

Applicants must pass a satisfactory examination in orthography, reading, penmanship, arithmetic, algebra, geometry, grammar, geography, U. S. history, general history, civil government, theory and art of teaching, natural philosophy, physiology and hygiene, botany, zoology, geology, chemistry, rhetoric, general literature and the school law of Michigan.

Examinations will continue three days and applicants must be in attendance during the entire time.

Timely publication will be made of the dates of all examinations.

All communications should be addressed to the Secretary of the State Board of Education, Lansing, Mich.

Below is a complete list of State certificates that have been granted in accordance with the provisions of Act No. 231, above referred to:

« AnteriorContinuar »