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Note:-In addition to the studies named above, the following are required of graduates in this course, viz.: Geography, Reading and Orthography, Civil Government, and Penmanship; also Geometry, Rhetoric and Physiology and Hygiene, provided these are displaced by a language.

TEXT AND REFERENCE BOOKS.
History:

U. S. Colonial-Doyle.
U. S. Federal Period—Johnston.
Reviews-King's Tabulations.

General History-Anderson.
Mathematics :

Arithmetic-Milne.
AlgebraBellows.
Geometry-Bellows.
Trigonometry-Bellows.

Surveying-Bellows.
Physical Sciences :

Astronomy-Newcomb and Holden.
Physics-Gage.
Chemistry–Barker and Jones' 1ables.

Syllabus-Strong.
Natural Sciences :

Botany, Structural-Bessey.
Botany, Systematic-Wood's Class Book, or Gray's Marrual
Physiology and Hygiene-Walker.
Zoology-Packard.

Zoology, Comparative.- Orton.
English:

Grammar-Reed and Kellogg.
Rhetoric-D. J. Hill.
English Literature-Brooks.
American Literature-Royse.
Orthography--Salisbury.
Book-keeping-Wooley.
Vocal Music and Voice Culture-Pease.
Civil Government-Young and Const. of Michigan,
Political Science-Wayland.
Mental Science-Sully or Haven.
Mental Science Applied to Teaching-Putnam's Outlines.

History of Education-Painter or Compayré.
Latin :

Grammar-Harkness.
First Lessons --Jones.
Cæsar - Allen and Greenough.
Cicero-Allen and Greenough or Harkness.

Latin:

Ovid-Allen and Greenough or Lincoln.
Vergil-Frieze.
Prose Composition-Jones.

Sight Reading-Tomlinson.
Greek:

Grammar-Hadley and Allen.
First Lessons-Boise.
Roader-Moss.
Prose-Jones.
Iliad-Keep.
Anabasis-Boise.

Sight Reading-Jerram.
German :

Grammar-Brandt.
Manual-Lodeman.
First Reader-Macmillan.
Goethe-Hermann und Dorothea.
Lessing-Minna von Barnhelm.
Gutzkow-Zopf und Schwert,
Schiller--Wilhelm Tell.
Heine-Prosa.
Goethe-Egmont.
Goethe-Prosa.
Goethe-Iphigenie.
Goethe-Torquato Tasso.
Lessing-Nathan der Weise.
Bucheim-Prose Composition.
Bucheim-German Lyrics.
Wagner-German Ballads.

Some German Work on Education.
French:

Macmillan, Course I.
Macmillan, Course II.
Macmillan, Course III.
Mme. de Girardin-La Joie fait Peur.
Scribe and Legouvé-La Bataille de Dames.
Halévy-L'Abbe Constantin.
Sandeau-Mlle. de la Seigliére.
G. Sand-La Mare au Diable.
Lacombe-Petite Histoire du Peuple Français.
Corneille-Le Cid.
Moliére-Les Femmes Savantes.
Racine--Esther.
Hugo-Hernani.
Legouvé-La Lecture en Action.
Sainte Beuve-Causeris.
Some French Work on Education,

TEXT BOOKS OF TRAINING SCHOOL.

Arithmetic-Bellows, Olney.
Language--Swinton, Reed and Kellogg.
Readers—Appleton, Barnes.
Geography-Appleton's Our World.
U. S. HistoryHigginson, Swinton.
Penmanship-Spencerian.
Dictionary-Webster.
Music-Pease, Tufts and Holt.

The year covered by this report has been one of decided prosperity, characterized in a marked degree by harmony and devotion in the corps of instructors. It will be seen that the attendance has been larger than at any previous time. Consequently, the need of added room for the uses of the school has been more apparent than ever before. The Committees on the State Normal School in both branches of the legislature, deeply impressed, both by their own observation, and by the forcible presentation of our needs in this direction made by the Board of Education, were unanimous in recommending an appropriation of $60,000 for enlarging our accommodations. This recommendation having met the approval of the legislature and of his Excellency, the Governor of Michigan, we shall begin the school year 1887–8 with renewed courage and confidence, assured that at an early date the Normal School will have room according to its strength.

As usual, the great body of our students have been earnest, hard working young men and women who come to the Normal School for a distinct and well defined purpose, whose attendance has cost personal effort and great sacrifice, who know the value of time too well to waste it in idleness or frivolity. On this account the administration of the school is comparatively easy. The following printed statements, placed in the hands of pupils at the opening of the year set forth principles which have governed in the administration of the school :

“It is taken for granted by the administration of the school that students enter the Normal solely for the purposes of study and instruction, and that they will devote their time and attention to these purposes ; that they will abstain from everything which would tend to hinder their own progress in their appropriate work or would, in any degree, interfere with the progress or rights of others.

“It is also assumed that they are acquainted with the usages and rules which govern the conduct and intercourse of ladies and gentlemen in general society and in well-regulated families, and that they will conform to these usages and rules at all times and in all places.

“It is required that students devote proper hours of the day, and evening hours of School days, commencing at 7:30 from the beginning of the Fall term to the first of April, and at 8:30 during the remainder of the year, to the preparation of lessons and other school work in their own rooms, and that they be in their own rooms at and after 10:30 on all evenings. This requirement is made, not only to encourage regular and systematic study, but also to protect industrious and faithful students against loss of tinne occasioned by improper and unnecessary interruptions. Students are at liberty to attend public meetings, lectures, concerts and other entertainments of proper character, provided such attendance does not interfere with the punctual and thorough performance of their school duties.

21

"It is suggested that students seek counsel and advice of their instructors in all cases of doubt in respect to the propriety or advantages of any proposed employment of time, or any course of life and conduct. The interests of teachers and pupils in all such matters are identical."

Very respectfully,
J. M. B. SILL,

Principal

B.

REPORT OF BOARD OF VISITORS.

Hon. JOSEPH ESTABROOK, Superintendent of Public Instrurtion :

SIR : The Committee of Visitors for the Normal School beg leave to make the following report :

We have visited the Normal School at different times during the year and have witnessed class work in all its departments, and were all present at the commencement exercises in June.

We find the general management excellent, the instruction well planned and thorough, the interest and progress of the students highly commendable.

We were especially pleased with the teaching done in the practice school by students under the eye of members of the faculty, indicating careful preparation as teachers, with excellent methods; and that the Normal School is truly fulfilling its mission of furnishing well-trained teachers for our public schools.

The constantly increasing attendance requires more room and conveniences, which the appropriation by the last legislature will supply for the present; but the large demand from our public schools for well-trained teachers indicates that the State will advance its own interests by liberally supplying the wants of this school.

While the present course of study has answered a good purpose, yet it seems to us that in order to keep pace with the advance of the public schools, it would be better to somewhat increase the requirements for admission, and add one year's advanced study, so that there shall be a greater difference between the acquirements of normal graduates and the requirements of high schools where they are expected to teach.

Respectfully submitted,

C. B. HALL,
L. D. NORRIS,
MRS. C. H. STANLEY,

Visitors.

C.

LIST OF BOOKS FOR TOWNSHIP AND DISTRICT LIBRARIES.

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