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III. HEBREW. 1. Conant's Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar. Biblia Hebraica.

through the year. 78 hours.

Two hours a week

II. ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE.

-English Grammar: Analysis of the English Sentence : Punctuation: Orthography, 1. Rhetoric. Text-books : Hill's Rhetoric; Bancroft's Composition. Frequent practi

cal exercises with special reference to Diction and Structure of the Sentence.

Two hours a week through the year. 78 hours. -Rhetoric: General History2. History of English Literature. Text-books : Welsh's Development of English Lit

erature, Taine's English Literature. Original studies of representative writers in

each period, with themes. Three hours a week through the year. 117 hours. -Rhetoric3. Early English-Chaucer : Prologue to Canterbury Tales, and Parliament of Foules.

William Langlande : Vision of Piers Plowman, One hour a week through the

year. 39 hours. -History of English Literature4. Study of Masterpieces. Pope's Essay on Criticism : Milton's Areopagitica ; Bacon's

Essays; Gray's Elegy; Bryants Thanatopsis. One hour a week through the year.

39 hours. -History of English Literature5. Study of Shakespeare. Selections from Hamlet, Merchant of Venice, Richard II,

Macbeth and Twelfth Night. One hour a week through the year. 39 hours. -English Literature: Psychology6. Philosophy of Composition. Text-books: Bain's Principles of Composition and

Campbell's Philosophy of Style. Lectures on the Principles of Literature. Two hours a week through the year. 78 hours.

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1. Beginning French. Text-book ; Duffet's French Method. Part I and selections

from Part II. Three hours a week through the year. 117 hours. -Course 1 in French2. French Literature. Text-book : Duffet. Two hours a week, first term. 30 hours. -Course 2 in French3. Cousin's Course de l'Histoire de la Philosophie (2 tomes). Two hours a week, sec

ond and third terms. 48 hours.

II. GERMAN.

1. Beginning German. Text-books : Otto's Grammar; Jones' Otto's German Reader.

Three hours a week through the year. 117 hours. -Course 1 in German2. German Plays. Text-books : Ahn's Dramatic Plays. Two hours a week, first term.

30 hours. -Course 2 in German3. German Classics. Schiller's Marie Stuart, or William Tell; Goethe's Iphigenie.

Two hours a week, second and third terms. 48 hours.

IV. MATHEMATICS. -Algebra: Geometry1. Trigonometry--Plane and Spherical. Text-book : Wentworth’s Trigonometry.

Three hours a week, first and second terms. 81 hours. -Trigonometry2. Analytical Geometry. Text-book : Peck’s Analytical Geometry. Three hours a

week, second and third terms. 72 hours. -Analytical Geometry3. Calculus-Differential and Integral. Text-book : Rice and Johnson's Calculus.

Three hours a week, first and second terms. Two hours a week third term. 105

hours. -Calculus4. Mechanics. Text-book: Smith's Mechanics. Three hours a week, first and second

terms. 81 hours. -Trigonometry7. Surveying. Text-book: Schuyler's Surveying. Three hours a week, second term.

24 hours. -Mechanics, 6. Astronomy--Spherical and Physical. Text-book: Norton's Astronomy. Two hours

a week. 78 hours.

V. HISTORY. -United States History1. General History. Text-book: Swinton's Outlines of History. Three hours a week,

first term. 45 hours. -General History2. English History. Text-book: Green's Short History of the English People. Three

hours a week, second and third terms. 72 hours. -General History3. History of Civilization in the Middle Ages. Text-book: Guizot. Two hours a

week through the first term. 30 hours. -English History4. Roman and Mediæval History. Text-book: Gibbon's Decline and all of the

Roman Empire (Selections). Two hours a week through the year. 78 hours.

VI. POLITICAL SCIENCE,

--General History; Psychology1. Political Economy. Text-book: Bowen's Political Economy; Selections from J. S.

Mills' Political Economy. Three hours a week, first term. 45 hours. - History of Civilization 2. Sociology. Text-book: Bagehot’s Physics and Politics. Spencer's Sociology. Two

hours a week, second and third terms. 48 hours. --Political Economy3. International Law. Text-book: Wolsey's International Law. Three hours a week, second term. 36 hours.

VII. PHILOSOPHY. -Rhetoric; Physiology; English Literature1. Psychology. Text-book: Porter's Elements of Intellectual Science. Parts I, II,

and III. Three hours a week, first and second terms. 81 hours.

-Psychology, 2. Metaphysics-Lectures and Recitations. Text-book : Porter's Intellectual Science,

Part IV, and Hamilton's Lectures on Metaphysics. Three hours a week, third

term. 36 hours. -Psychology, 3. Deductive Logic. Text-book : Jevon's Logic; Bain's Deductive Logic. Three

hours a week, first term. 45 hours.' -Psychology: Botany, Zoology or Physics4. Inductive Logic. Text-books : Fowler's Inductive Logic; Mills' System of Logic,

selections from Books III and IV. Three hours a week, second and third terms.

72 hours, -Psychology, 5. Moral Science. Text-book: Hopkins' Law of Love. Three hours a week, first

term. 45 hours. Metaphysics6. History of Philosophy-Lectures and Recitations. Text-books: Schwegler's His

tory of Philosophy; Eucken's Fundamental Concepts of Modern Philosophic

Thought. Two hours a week through the year. 78 hours. Psychology7. Theism-Lectures and Recitations. Text-books: Bowne's Theism: Diman's The

istic Argument. Three hours a week, second and third terms. 72 hours.

VIII. PAYSICAL SCIENCE,

-Elementary Philosophy; Geometry ; Trigonometry. 1. Physics-Experimental Lectures and Recitations. Text-book: Daniell's Principles

of Physics. Three hours a week, the first and second terms. 81 hours. -Course 1 in Physics2. Physics—Preparatory practice with Problems. Three hours a week, third term.

36 hours. -Physics3. General Chemistry-Experimental and Recitations. Text-book : Elliott and Stor

er's Manual. Three hours a week, first term, Inorganic; second term, Organic.

81 hours. -Inorganic ; General Chemistry4. Analytical Chemistry–Laboratory work in Qualitative Analysis. with Lectures. Text-book: Hill's Lecture Notes on Qualitative Analysis. Three hours (equivalent) a

week, second and third terms. 72 hours.

IX. NATURAL HISTORY. - Natural Philosophy, 1. Botany-Structural-Class Work. Text-book : Wood's Botanist and Florist. Three 4. Geology-Recitations and Lectures. Text-book : Le Conte's Geology. Three hours

hours a week, second term. 36 hours. -Structural Botany2. Botany-Systematic-Class and Laboratory Work. Three hours a week, third

term. 36 hours. 3. Zoology-Text-book : Orton's Comparative Zoölogy. Three hours a week, first

term. 45 hours.

a week, second and third terms. 72 hours.

X. CHARACTER-BUILDING.

1. Lectures----Analysis of Human Nature; Elements of Conduct ; Laws of Attention

and Habit, as affecting character ; selecting and Confirming Dispositions ; Ideals of Character, etc. Two hours a week through the year.

EXPENSES AND ACCOMMODATIONS.

Tuition and incidental expenses are $9.00 a term. Library fee, 50 cents a term. These are the only expenses in the literary department, aside from the cost of living, books, etc.

The expenses of a year at College, for tuition, board, room-rent, and fuel, will vary from $90.00 to $150.00, according to the manner of living.

In cases where the parent or student does not care to be troubled about the arrangement of details the College will supply the student with board, room-rent, fuel, tuition and incidental charges in the literary department for $150.00 per year, of which amount *58.00 shall be paid in the fall term, and $46.00 each of the remaining two terms.

In the College Dining Hall the past year, board has cost about $2.00 per week. In clubs it ranges from $1.00 to $1.50 per week. The College gives special facilities to students wishing to economize in this respect. Rooms supplied with cooking-stoves, utensils, cupboards, etc., are furnished both to young gentlemen and ladies wishing to board themselves. The authorities of the institution fell that every practicable facility that can be afforded should be supplied those who are struggling for an educatiou under difficulties.

The following table gives some idea of the expenses for one year at college. The board is, of course, the principal item of expense. This item varies according to the manner of boarding :

College charges, one year...
Board,
Room-rent and fuel “
Washing and light
Books,

$28.50 to $28.50

40.00 " 90.00
15.00 "

40.00

12.00 4.00 66

10.00

8.00 -6

Total....

$95.50 to $180.50

A laboratory fee of $5.00 is charged students who take the course in Analytical Chemistry.

A diploma fee of $5.00 is charged to those graduating.

The Boarding Hall, in connection with the College, is conducted by parties under supervision of the Faculty and the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees. By this arrangement, the price of boarding per week will not, it is believed, exceed $2.00; and any variation in the price will hereafter depend upon the changes that occur in the prices of necessary supplies. It is the purpose of those having charge of the hall to keep the price of board as low as circumstances will justify, in order to cover actual expenses.

No student will be registered for less than a consecutive half term of lessons in any department of the College. No discount will be made for lessong missed through the neglect of the student.

In November, 1886, our chapel building was unroofed by storm. The repair of the walls and roof of the chapel has been accomplished at an expense of about twelve hundred dollars, which sum has been generously donated by friends of the College.

During the year the finances of the college have been improved by an addition of $13,548.70 to the invested endowment funds. These additions were largely from bequests by friends of the college. The following is an itemized statement of the additions referred to:

Sunday School Chair.
Lake Estate..
Detroit Lots.
Calvin Estate.
Sill Estate...
Reeves Estate.
Memorial Chair...
People's Chair.
Ladies' Chair..
Bills Receivable...
Wm. Morrison Estate.

$827 54 2,506 68 1,650 00 449 35

14 10 1,907 18

32 00 665 00

40 85 456 00 5,000 00

$13,548 70

Measures are being pushed forward that must largely increase our resources. Our outlook for the future in this direction is certainly hopeful.

Respectfully submitted,
D. S. STEPHENS,

President.

REPORT OF BOARD OF VISITORS.

Hon. JOSEPH ESTABROOK,

Superintendent of Public Instruction : DEAR SIR,—Two members of the committee appointed to visit Adrian College for the year 1887, have performed that duty, and respectfully submit the following report :

Our visit was made in the latter part of March. As our coming was unheralded, we found the College in the midst of its regular, every day work. We were present at the morning chapel service, and were greatly pleased to see the room filled with students, and to witness the interest manifested in the exercises. President Stephens was absent on business during a part of the time of our visit, but through the courtesy of Professor C. E. Wilbur every opportunity was extended to us to observe the work of teachers and pupils in the various class-rooms.

To us the work of instruction appeared to be well done in all departments. The literary societies are well organized, and so conducted as to assist the students in acquiring skill in writing, public speaking, debates, etc. The exercises are open to the public.

Another commendable feature which we noted was, that the moral as]well as the intellectual development of the students is carefully looked after.

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