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2d. To produce a slighter disjunction than would be made by a pause; and thus at once to separate and unite; as,

Would you kill your friend and benefactor? Would you practice hypocrisy and smile in his face, while your conspiracy is ripening?

3d. To break up the current of sound into small portions, which can be easily managed by the speaker, without the abruptness which would result from pausing wherever this relief was needed; and to give ease in speaking; as,

Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze,
Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees;
Lives through all life, extends through all extent,
Spreads

undivided, operates unspent. GENERAL RULE.—When a preposition is followed by as many as three or four words which depend upon it, the word preceding the preposition will either have suspensive quantity, or else a pause; as,

He is the pride of the whole country.

Require students to tell which of the preceding rules or principles is illustrated, wherever a mark, representing the pause or suspensive quantity, is introduced in the following

EXERCISES IN PAUSES.

1. It matters very little - what immediate spot - may have been the birth-place of such a man as Washington. No people, can claim y no country can appropriate him. The boon of Providence to the human race his fame is eternity uy and his dwelling-place-creation.

2. Though it was the defeat of our arms and the disgrace y of our policy - I almost bless ti convulsion in which he had his origin. If the heavens thundered - and the earth rocked yet - when the storm passed how pure was the climate that it cleared yy how bright

in the brow of the firmament was the planet - which it revealed to us!

3. In the production of Washington it does really appear as if nature was endeavoring to improve upon herself and that all the virtues of the ancient world, were but so many studies - preparatory to the pătriot of the new. Individual

instances no doubt there were splendid exemplifications of some single qualification. Cæsar-was merciful Scipiowas continent Hannibal was patient. But it was reserved for Washington to blend them all in one and like the lovely masterpiece of the Grecian artist to exhibit in one glow of associated beauty - the pride of every modèl, and the perfection of every master.

4. As a general, he marshaled the peasant into a veteran and supplied by discipline the absence of experience. As a statesman my he enlarged the policy of the cabinet into the most comprehensive system of general advantage. And suchy was the wisdom of his views and the philosophy of his counsels my that to the soldier and the statesman , he almost added the character of the sage.

5. A conqueror he was untainted with the crime of bloodyy a revolutionist, he was free from any stain of treason for aggression commenced the contest and his country called him to the field. Liberty - unsheathed his sword yu necessitystained victory returned it.

6. If he had paused here history might have doubted, what station to assign him whether at the head of her citizens or her soldiers my her heroes or her pātriots. But the last glorious act y crowns his career and banishes all hesitation. Who like Washington, after having emancipated a hemisphere - resigned its crown and preferred the retirement of domestic life y to the adoration of a land he might almost be said to have created ? 7. How shall we rank thee upon glory's page,

Thou more than soldier M and just less than sage!
All thou hast been reflects less praise on thee,
Far less than all thou hast forborne to be.

KEY TO THE USE OF MARKED LETTERS.

åge or age, åt or åt, årt, áll, båre, åsk; wè or wē, end or ěnd, her; ice or īce, în or în, fly, hýmn; old or õld, on or ön, d8; múte or mūte, ủp or ủp, füll; this; azure; reäl, (not rēl); o'vershoot'; badness, (not năss); aged, (not ājd); ġ as j.

INDEX TO EDITIONS.

OLD ED.

OLD ED.

152

148

OLD ED. 294 163 316 318 322 325

200

67 71 77 171 99 95 360 81 84 160 249 251 253 256 138

231

92

233 235 236 239 241 296 296 298 264 262 259 498 499 307 384 501

243

THE figures refer to the pages where the same lessons may be found in the two editions of this work.

NEW ED.

77.... 81. 85. 87. 89. 92. 94. 97. 100. 101. 103.

105.

178 180 181 183 187 191 176 168 538 173 197 300 304

106. 110. 113. 117. 120. 123. 126. 129. 132. 134. 136. 139. 140. 142. 144. 147. 148. 150. 153. 155. 175. 160. 162.

NEW ED. 164. 165. 166. 170. 172. 174. 177. 178. 180. 183. 184. 185. 189. 192. 198. 199. 202. 204. 207. 210. 214. 217. 221 224. 227 230. 232. 234. 237. 240. 243. 247. 249. 253.

398 401 404 116 119 109 111 115

NEW ED.
256..
257.
261.
263.
267
270.
275.
277.
280.
282.
283.
284.
287.
289..
291.
293.
294.
295.
297.
299.
301.
304.
305.
307.
309.
311.
313.
315.
317.
318.
321.
324.
327.
330.

282
375

121
123
127
128
130
134
415

145 216 218 221 224 228 285 287 291

255.

333..

436

OLD ED.

445

OLD ED. 378 483 486 489 493 510 511 505

540 543

424 427 430 459 465 468 470 449 454

549

416

528

OLD ED.

NEW ED.

NEW ED.

272 273 275 277 420 422 359 356 334 595 412 330 336

515.. 518. 521. 524. 527. 532 533. 535. 537. 543. 544.

547..

NEW ED. 338. 339. 341. 343. 346. 348. 350. 352. 355. 357. 359. 362. 365. 370. 373. 378. 381. 384. 387. 390. 394. 396. 398. 400.. 403. 405. 406.

419.
422.
426.
434.
436.
440.
443.
447.
450.
452.
455.
458.
461.
463.
466.
469.
473.
479.
480.
482.
483.
485.
487.
493.
498,
501,
505.
507.
509.
511.

344
502
381
479
387
391
394
395
363

549.
551.
555.
558.
562.
565.
568.
571.
575
577...
580..
583.
583.
587.
590.
593.
596.

565 569 572 562 583 575 578 586

588 592 477

410...

374
365
369
597
314

414.
417...

518

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3

JAN
ANUARY! Darknèss and light reign ălike. Snow is on

the ground. Cold is in thē’ air. The winter is blossoming in frost-flowers. Why is the ground hidden? Why is the earth white? So hath God wiped out the past, so hath he spread the earth like an unwritten page, for å° new year! Old sounds are silent in the forest and in the air. Insects are dead, birds? are gone, leaves have perished, and all the foundations of soil remain. Upon this lies, white and tranquil, the emblem of newness and purity, the virgin' robes of the yet unstained year!

2. FEBRUARY! The day gains upon the night. The strife of heat and cold is scarce" begun. The winds that come from the desolate north wander through forests of frost-cracking boughs, and shout in the air the weird ” cries of the northern bergs": and ice-resounding oceans. Yět, as the month wears on, the silent work begins, though storms rage. The earth is hidden yệt, but not dead. The sun is drawing near. The storms cry out. But the sun is not heard in all the heavens. Yet he whispers words of deliverance into the ears of ěvery sleeping seed and root" that lies beneath the snow. The day opens, but the night shuts the earth with its fröst-lock. They strive together, but

The, (thă), see Rule 3, p. 32. Virgin, (ver' jin). 2 Thē, see Rule 3, p. 32.

10 Scarce, (skårs). Air, (år), see Note 2, p. 22.

" Wēird, like witches; skilled in * Earth, (érth), see Note 4, p. 22. witchcraft ; unearthly ; wild. • Past, (påst), see Note 3, p. 22. » Bergs, (bêrgz), hills; an iceberg A, (ă), see Rule 2, p. 32.

is a hill or mountain of ice, or a vast ? Birds, (bērdz).

body of ice floating on the ocean. Göne, see Note 1, p. 23.

13 Root, (r8t).

8

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