Horse-shoes and Horse-shoeing: Their Origin, History, Uses, and Abuses

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Chapman and Hall, 1869 - 692 páginas
 

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Página 362 - There at the door they stood, with wondering eyes to behold him Take in his leathern lap the hoof of the horse as a plaything...
Página iv - A little neglect may breed great mischief; for want of a nail the shoe was lost, for want of a shoe the horse was lost, and for want of a horse the rider was lost, being overtaken and slain by the enemy; all for want of a little care about a horseshoe nail.
Página 351 - From whence came Smith, all be he knight or squire, But from the smith that forgeth at the fire?
Página 347 - No tenant ventur'd on th' unwholesome ground. Here smokes his forge, he bares his sinewy arm, And early strokes the sounding anvil warm : Around his shop the steely sparkles flew, As for the steed he shap'd the bending shoe.
Página 513 - ... advantage to the hoof; and as the frog or heel is allowed to rest upon the ground, the foot enjoys the same points of support as in its natural state. It must therefore be much easier for the horse in his way of going, and be a means of making him surer footed. It is likewise evident that, from this shoe, the hoof cannot acquire any bad form ; when, at the same time, it receives every advantage that possibly could be expected from shoeing. In this respect it may very properly be said, that we...
Página 30 - We possess in England the most precious examples of Grecian power in the sculpture of animals. The horses of the frieze in the Elgin Collection appear to live and move, to roll their eyes, to gallop, prance, and curvet ; the veins of their faces and legs seem distended with circulation ; in them are distinguished the hardness and decision of bony forms, from the elasticity of tendon and the softness of flesh. The beholder is charmed with the deer-like lightness and elegance of their make, and although...
Página 174 - Two tunnels had been formed in the side of a hill ; they were wide at one extremity, but tapered off to a narrow bore at the other, where they met in a point. The mouths of the channels opened towards the west, from which quarter a prevalent wind blows in this valley, and sometimes with great violence. The blast received by them would, when the wind was high, be poured with considerable foree and effect upon the smelting furnaces at the extremity of the tunnels.
Página 453 - The passengers, who had lodged in the inn that night, had, as soon as they were up, sent for a smith to visit their horses, it being a hard frost. The smith, when he had done what he was sent for, according to the custom of that people, examined the feet of the other two horses to find more work. When he had observed them, he told the host of the house...
Página 16 - Then, where the thickest fought, the victor flew; The king's example all his Greeks pursue. Now by the foot the flying foot were slain, Horse trod by horse, lay foaming on the plain. From the dry fields thick clouds of dust arise, Shade the black host, and intercept the skies. The brass-hoof d steeds tumultuous plunge and bound, And the thick thunder beats the labouring ground...
Página 214 - We formerly sent our apostles with evident miracles and arguments ; and we sent down with them the scriptures, and the balance," that men might observe justice : and we sent them down iron,' wherein is mighty strength for war...

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