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S AND CRESSIDI. se not merely to and

beauty brat Were it not that we mora affected rable keeping her. I would star of Trojan blood

e soul of her Than the persone of our hesving spleens, er worths, and pent more interrace. But, worthy Hector, palsian! Cat Whose prestatzge may beat dows our foes, ng in your con Por, I presume, brate Heetor would not lose est spirit on our So rich advantage of a promis'd glory, aded; nor DODR For the wide yorld's revenue.

ere, or sword to r As smiles upon the forehead of this action,
mubject: then, 1 You Taliant offspring of great Priamas.-
Ther, whers, I have a roisting chaillzoge sent amongst
es cannot paralin The dull and factisus mobles of the Greeks,
question now I was advertis'd their great general slept,
ilus, you here will strike amatement to their drowsy spirits :
dm Aristotle thout This, I pretium, Will wice him.
rficially; not. Whilst emulation in the army crept;

Se. 3.

TROILUS AND CRESSIDA.
Upon our joint and sereral dignities.

Tro. Way, then you touch'd the life of our design:
Hect.

it to the fansat

ossession up

estow'd, or desde

do more conda tempard bland For pleasure

determination

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Se. 3. TROILUS AND CRESSIDA. 291
Upon our joint and several dignities.

Tro Why, there you touch'd the llfe of our design:
Were it not glory, that we more affected
Than the performance of our heaving spleens,
I would not wish a drop of Trojan blood
Spent more in her defence. But, worthy Hector,
She is a theme of honour and renown;
A spur to valiant and magnanimous deeds;
Whose present courage may beat down our foes,
And fame, in time to come, canonize us :
For, I presume, brave Hector would not lose
So rich advantage of a promis'd glory,
As smiles upon the forehead of this action,
For the wide world's revenue.

Hect.
You valiant offspring of great Priamus.-
I have a roisting challenge sent amongst
The dull and factious nobles of the Greeks,
Will strike amazement to their drowsy spirits:
I was advertis'd their great general slept
Whilst emulation in the army crept;
This, I presume, will wake him.

[Exeunt.
SCENE III.
The Grecian comp. Before Achilles' tent.

Enter THERSITES.
Ther. How now, Thersites? what, lost in the
labyrinth of thy fury! Shall the elephant Ajax
earty it thus? he beats me, and I rail at him: 0
worthy satisfaction! 'would, it were otherwise ;
that could beat him, whilst he railed at me :
Sfoot, I'll learn to conjure and raise devils, but
I'll see some issue of my spiteful execrations. Then
there's Achilles, rare engineer. If Troy be not
taken till these two undermine it, the walls will
stand till they fall of themselves. O thou great
thunder-darter of Olympus, forget that thou art
Jove the king of gods;

and, Mercury, lose all the
serpentine craft of thy Caduceus; if ye take not that
little little less-than-little wit from them that they
have! which short-armed ignorance itself knows is
30 abundant scarce, it will not in circumvention
deliver a fly from a spider, without drawing their
massy irons, and cutting the web. After this, the
vengeance on the whole camp! or, rather, the bone-
ache! for that, methinks, is the curse dependant

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Hect.

I am yours

Upon our joint and several dignities,

I'ro. Why, there you touch'd the life of our desiga:
Were it not glory, that we more affected
Than the performance of our heaving spleens,
I would not wish a drop of Trojan blood
Spent more in her defence. But, worthy Hector,
She is a theme of honour and renown;
A spur to valiant and magnanimous deeds ;
Whose present courage may beat down our foes,
And fame, in time to come, canonize us :
For, I presume, brave Hector would not lose
So rich advantage of a promis'd glory,
As smiles upon the forehead of this action,
For the wide world's revenue.
You valiant offspring of great Priamus.
I have a roisting challenge sent amongst
The dull and factious nobles of the Greeks,
Will strike amazement to their drowsy spirits :
I was advertis'd their great general slept,
Whilst emulation in the army crept;
This, I presume, will wake him. [Excunt.

SCENE III.
The Grecian camp. Before Achilles' tent.

Enter THERSITES.
Ther. How now, Thersites? what, lost in the
labyrinth of thy fury? Shall the elephant Ajax
carry it thus ? he beats me, and I rail at him: 0
worthy satisfuction! 'would, were otherwise ;
that I could beat him, whilst he railed at me:
'Sfoot, I'll learn to conjure and raise devils, but
I'll see some issue of my spiteful execrations. Then
there's Achilles,-a rare engineer. If Troy be not
taken till these two undermine it, the walls will
stand till they fall of themselves. Othou great
thunder-darter of Olympus, forget that thou art
Jove the king of gods; and, Mercury, lose all the
serpentine craft of thy Caduceus ; if ye take not that
little little less-than-little wit from them that they
have ! which short-armed ignorance itself knows is
80 abundant scarce, it will not in circumvention
deliver a fly from a spider, without drawing their
massy irons, and cutting the web. After this, the
vengeance on the whole camp! or, rather, the bone-
sche ! for that, methinks, is the curse dependant

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292 TROILUS AND CRESSIDA.

Act 2.
on those that war for a placket. I have said my
prayers, and the devil, envy, say Amen. What,
ho! my lord Achilles !

Enter PATROCLUS.
Patr. Who's there? Thersites? Good Thersites,
come in and rail.

Ther. If I could have remembered a gilt coun-
terfeit, thou wouldst not have slipped out of my
contemplation : but it is no matter; Thyself upon
thyselfi The common curse of mankind, folly and
ignorance, be thine in great revenue ! heaven bless
thee from a tutor, and discipline come not near
thee! Let thy blood be thy direction till thy
death! then it'she, that lays thee out, says--thon
she never shrouded any but lazars. Amen. Where's
Achilles ?

Patr. What, art thou devout? wast thou in
prayer?
l'her. Ay; the heavens hear me!

Enter ACHILLES.
Achil. Who's there?
Patr. Thersites, my lord.

Achil. Where, where ?- Art thou come? Why,
my cheese, my digestion, why hast thou not served
thyself in to my table so many meals? Come;
what's Agamemnon?

Ther. T'hy commander, Achilles ;-Then tell me,
Patroclus, what's Achilles !

Par. Thy lord, Thersites; Then tell me, I pray
thee, what's thyself ?

Ther. Thy knower, Patroclus ; Then tell me,
Patroclus, what art thou ?

Patr. Thou mayst tell, that knowest.
Achil. O, tell, tell.

Ther. I'll decline the whole question. Agamem-
non commands Achilles ; Achilles is my lord; I am
Patroclus' knower; and Patroclus is a fool.
Patr. You rascal!
Ther. Peace, fool; I have not done.
Achil. He is a privileged man.-

Proceed, Ther-
sites.

Ther. Agamemnon is a fool; Achilles is a fool; Thersites is a fool; and, as aforesaid, Patroclus is a fool.

Sc. 3. TROILUS AND CRESSIDA: 293
Achil. Derive this, come.

Ther. Agamemnon is a fool to offer to command
Achilles; Achilles is a fool to be commanded of
Agamemnon; Thersites is a fool to serve such a
fool; and Patroelus is a fool positive.

Patr. Why am I a fool?
Ther. Make that demand of the prover.-It suf-
fices me, thou art, Look you, who comes here!
Enter AGAMEMNON, ULYSSES, NESTOR,

DIOMEDES, and AJAX.
Achil. Patroclus, l'll speak with nobody:--Come
in with me, Thersites.

Exit.
Ther. Here is such patchery, such juggling, and.
sach knavery! all the argument is, a cuckold, and
a whore; A good quarrel, to draw emulous factions,
and bleed to death upon. Now the dry serpigo on
the subject! and war, and lechery, confound all!

[Exit.
Agan. Where is Achilles?
Patr. Within his tent; but ill dispos'd, my lord.
Agam. Let it be known to him, that we are here.
He shent our messengers; and we lay by
Our appertainments, visiting of him :
Let him be told so; lest, perchance, he think
We dare not move the question of our place,
Or know not what we are.

I shall say so to him.

Exit.
Ulyss. We saw him at the opening of his tent;
He is not sick.

Ajus. Yes, lion-sick, sick of proud heart : you
may call it melancholy, if you will favour the
man; but, by my head, "tis pride : But why, why?
let him show us a cause.- À word, my lord.

(Takes Agamemnon aside,
Nest. What moves Ajax thus to bay at him!
Ulyss. Achilles hath inveigled his fool from him,
Nest. Who! Thersites!
Ulyss. He.
Nest. Then will Ajax lack matter, if he have lost

Ulys. No; you see, he is his argument, that has
his argument; Achilles.

Nest. All the better; their fraction is more our wish, than their faction: But it was a strong composure, a fool.could disunite.

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Achil. Derive this; come.

Ther. Agamemnon is a fool to offer to command Achilles ; Achilles is a fool to be commanded of Agamemnon; Thersites is a fool to serve such & fool; and Patroclus is a fool positive.

Patr. Why am I a fool!

Ther. Make that demand of the prover.-It suffices me, thou art, Look you, who comes here! Enter AGAMEMNON, ULYSSES, NESTOR,

DIOMEDES, and AJAX. Achil. Patroclus, I'll speak with nobody :-Come in with me, Thersites.

Ther. Here is such patchery, such juggling, and such knavery! all the argument is, a cuckold, and a whore; A good quarrel, to draw emulous factions, and bleed to death upon. Now the dry serpigo on the subject! and war, and lechery, confound all !

(Ezit.
Agam. Where is Achilles ?
Patr. Within his tent; but ill-dispos'a, my lord.

Agam. Let it be known to him, that we are here.
He shent our messengers; and we lay by
Our appertainments, visiting of him :
Let him be told so; lest, perchance, he think
We dare not move the question of our place,
Or know not what we are.
Patr.

I shall say so to him.

[Exil. Ulyss. We saw him at the opening of his teat; He is not sick.

Ajur'. Yes, lion-sick, sick of proud heart : you may call it melancholy, if you will favour the man; but, by my head, 'tis pride : But why, why? let him show us a canse.--A word, my lord.

[Takes Agamemnon aside, Nest. What moves Ajax thus to bay at him? Ulyss. Achilles hath inveigled his fool from him. Nest. Who? Thersites! Ulyss. He. Nest. Then will Ajax lack matter, if he have lost his argument.

Ulyss. No; you see, he is his argument, that has his argument; Achilles.

Nest. All the better; their fraction is more our wish, than their faction: But it was a strong composure, a fool could disupite.

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