Southern Quarterly Review, Volume 3

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Daniel Kimball Whitaker, Milton Clapp, William Gilmore Simms, James Henley Thornwell
Wiley & Putnam, 1843

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Página 21 - It is come, I know not how, to be taken for granted, by many persons, that Christianity is not so much as a subject of inquiry ; but that it is, now at length, discovered to be fictitious. And accordingly they treat it, as if, in the present age, this were an agreed point, among all people of discernment...
Página 328 - WE, the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, ensure domestic tranquillity, provide for the common defence, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.
Página 11 - The Niobe of nations, — there she stands, Childless and crownless, in her voiceless woe ; An empty urn within her withered hands, Whose holy dust was scattered long ago ; The Scipios...
Página 514 - ... in case of a deliberate, palpable and dangerous exercise of other powers not granted by the said compact, the states who are parties thereto have the right, and are in duty bound to interpose for arresting the progress of the evil, and for maintaining within their respective limits, the authorities, rights and liberties appertaining to them.
Página 281 - And the LORD smelled a sweet savour ; and the LORD said in his heart, I will not again curse the ground any more for man's sake; for the imagination of man's heart is evil from his youth; neither will I again smite any more every thing living, as I have done. While the earth remaineth, seedtime and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter, and day and night shall not cease.
Página 194 - Some capital city; or less than if this frame Of heaven were falling, and these elements In mutiny had from her axle torn The steadfast earth. At last his sail-broad vans He spreads for flight, and in the surging smoke Uplifted spurns the ground...
Página 45 - For the kind spring which but salutes us here, Inhabits there and courts them all the year ; Ripe fruits and blossoms on the same trees live, At once they promise what at once they give ; So sweet the air, so moderate the clime, None sickly lives or dies before his time ; Heaven sure has kept this spot of earth uncurst To show how all things were created first.
Página 12 - The various modes of worship, which prevailed in the Roman world, were all considered by the people, as equally true; by the philosopher, as equally false; and by the magistrate, as equally useful.
Página 514 - ... interposition, thus solemnly asserted by the State of Virginia, be it called what it may — State-right, veto, nullification, or by any other name — I conceive to be the fundamental principle of our system, resting on facts historically as certain as our revolution itself, and deductions as simple and demonstrative as that of any political or moral truth whatever ; and I firmly believe that on its recognition depend the stability and safety of our political institutions.
Página 381 - But here are common, earthly hues, to such an aspect wrought. That none, save thine, can seem so like the beautiful of thought. The song I sing, thy likeness like, is painful mimicry Of something better, which is now a memory to me, Who have upon life's frozen sea arrived the icy spot, Where men's magnetic feelings show their guiding task forgot.

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