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Yet ev'n the greatest griefs

May be reliefs, Could he but take them right and in their ways.

Happy is he whose heart

Hath found the art
To turn his double pains to double praise.

All the wayes of righteousnesse

I did think were full of trouble;
I complain'd of tediousnesse,
And each duty seemed double :

Whilst I serv'd Him but of feare,
Ev'ry minute did appeare
Longer farre then a whole year.

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Christopher Harvey, born in 1597, was the son of a preacher at Bunbury, in Cheshire. His mother, in 1609, took in second marriage another preacher, Thomas Pierson, of Brampton-Brian, on the borders of Radnor and Hereford. Christopher in 1613 entered Brasenose College as a poor scholar, graduated as B.A. in 1617, M.A. in 1620. He was living by the Wye, at Whitney, in Hereford-perhaps as curate— before he became rector there after the death of his predecessor, in December, 1630. For half a year, from September, 1632, to March, 1633, Christopher Harvey left Whitney to be head-master of the Grammar School at Kington; but he returned to Whitney, and four more children were born there, making a family of five, before November, 1635, when Sir Robert Whitney of Whitney presented him to the vicarage of Clifton-on-Dunsmore, in Warwickshire. Here he had four more children, of whom one, named Whitney, died in infancy, and then he himself died at the age of sixty-six, in 1663. In 1647, the Vicar of Clifton published anonymously “ The Synagogue, or Shadow of the Temple. Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations in imitation of Mr. George Herbert,” of which there was a fourth edition in his lifetime (1661). In the same year he published “Schola Cordis,” or the Heart of itself gone away from God, brought back again to Him, and instructed by Him. In forty-seven Emblems." This (left with the old spelling unaltered) is the thirtyfifth

THE ENLARGING OF THE HEART.
How pleasant is that now which heretofore
Mine heart held bitter-sacred learning's lore!
Enlargéd hearts enter with greatest ease
The straitest paths, and runne the narrowest wayes.

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Christopher Harvey and his “Synagogue" received this praise from Izaak Walton

TO MY REVEREND FRIEND.

When before my God commanded

Anything He would have done,
I was close and gripple-handed,
Made an end ere I begunne;

If He thought it fit to lay
Judgements on me, I could say,
“ They are good,”—but shrinke away.

I loved you for your Synagogue before
I knew your person; but now love you more;

Because I find
It is so true a picture of your mind;

Which tunes your sacred lyre
To that eternal quire,
Where holy Herbert sits

(O shame to profane wits!) And sings his and your anthems, to the praise Of Him that is the First and Last of days.

1 The Rev. A. B. Grosart, in his edition for the “Fuller Worthies Library" of the whole works of Christopher Harvey--then first collected-made valuable additions to our knowledge of facts of his life.

3" The School of the Heart."

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Say, heavenly Muse, shall not thy sacred vein

Afford a present to the infant God ?
Hast thou no verse, no hymn, or solemn strain,

To welcome Him to this His new abode,
Now, while the heaven, by the Sun's team untrod,
Hath took no print of the approaching light, 20
And all the spangled host keep watch in squadrons bright?

1 There was said to have been peace throughout the world af 13* time of the birth of Christ. This happened in the reign of AREA when the idea of universal Peace--the Roman Peace-charme pure and politicians. Virgil expressed it through the forecast of tbe so of Anchises in the sixth book of the "Æneid :

“But ye, my Romans, still control

The nations far and wide.
Be this your genius, to impose
The Rule of Peace on vanquished foes,
Show pity to the humbled soul
And crush the sons of pride."

(Conington's Train 2 Ovid tells, in the eleventh book of his “Metamorpbores Ceyx, king of Trachis, sailed to consult an oracle, promo.az s * wife Alcyone, daughter of Æolus, god of the winds, that love return in two months. He was wrecked in a storm. Juni Isis to bring to Alcyone a dream, from the pod of sleep. *** which the gbost of her dead husband told his fate. She makes

See how from far upon the eastern road

The star-led wizards haste with odours sweet! Oh! run, prevent them with thy humble ode,

And lay it lowly at His blessed feet;

Have thou the honour first thy Lord to greet, And join thy voice unto the angel quire, From out His secret altar touched with hallowed fire.

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wild grief, rushed to the shore, and saw his body floating on the waves

“ Thither forthwith, O wonderful! she springs

Beating the passive air with new-grown wings,
Who, now a bird, the water's summit rakes;
About she flies, and full of sorrow makes
A mournful noise, lamenting her divorce :
Anon she touched his dumb and bloodless corse,
With stretched wings embraced her perished blis3
And gave his colder lips a heatless kiss.
Whether he felt it or the floods his look
Advanced, the vulgar doubt; yet sure he took
Sense from the touch. The gods commiserate,
And change them both, obnoxious to like fate.
As erst they love; their nuptial faiths they shew
In little birds, engender, parents grow.
Seven winter days in peaceful calms possest
Alcyon sits upon her floating nest;
They safely sail, then Æolus incaves
For his, the Winds, and smooths the stooping waves."

(Sandys's Translation.) This is the fable of the Halcyon in whose breeding time at sea there is a calm.

I Than, then. Our two words were originally one word, “ thanne." - Silly, simple, innocent; from "sæ'lig," happy, blessed.

3 Unerpressive, ineffable, inexpressible. So Milton's Lycidas in heaven "hears the unexpressive nuptial song;” and Rosalind, in “As You Like It," is “The fair, the chaste and unexpressive she."

4 Ninefold harmony of the spheres. According to the Ptolemaic astronomy, there were nine moving spheres of the world; outermost, the "primum mobile," which gave motion to the others and carried them round with it in diurnal revolution, then the sphere of the fixed stars, then successively inwards the spheres or orbits of Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, the Sun, Venus, Mercury, the Moon, the Earth being in the centre. The nine spheres were said to correspond to the nine Muses, the spaces between them formed musical intervals, and the sounds produced by their movements were said to blend in a perfect harmony of the universe. The interval from the earth to the moon was a tone, from the moon to Mercury a semitone, from Mercury to Venus another semitone, but thence to the sun three tones and a half or a diapente (the old term for an interval of a fifth), and from the moon to the sun two and a half or a diatessaron (interval of a fourth); then a tone from the sun to Mars; from Mars to Jove and from Jove to Saturn each a semitone, again a semitone to the starry sphere. From the earth, therefore, to the starry heavens a complete diapason (or octave) of six tones. Besides this, there was said to be musical proportion in the rate of movement of the planets, and the sounds produced thereby; the swifter motion of the moon causing a sound of higher pitch than that of the starry sphere, which being slowest of all produces the gravest sound, "the base of heaven's deep organ;" but there is a proportionate return caused by the motion of the primum mobile with which the starry sphere has swiftest accord and makes the shrillest treble and the moon the base,

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