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* His snow-white steed appeared of heavenly kind.

Begot by Boreas on the Thracian hills; More strong and speedy than his parent wind : And (which His foes with fear and horror |

Out from His mouth a two-edged sword !

Whose sharpest steel the bone and main And with his keenest point unbreasts the n

TO HIS DEAR GOD.

I'll hope no more For things that will not come; Ind, if they do, they prove but cumbersome.

Wealth brings much woe; And, since it fortunes so, 'Tis better to be poor

Than so t'abound

As to be drowned
Or overwhelm'd with store.

Pale care, avant,
I'll learn to be content
With that small stock thy bounty gave or lent.

What may conduce
To my most healthful use,
Almighty God, me grant!

But that or this

That hurtful is
Deny thy suppliant.

u The Dragon, wounded with His powerful

They take, and in strong bonds and fi ii Short was the fight, nor could he long w: Him, whose appearance is His victory.

So now he's bound in adamantine's

He storms, he roars, he yells for i. His net is broke, the fowl go free, the

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· Thence by a Mighty Swain he soon

Unto a thousand thousand tortil' His tail, whose folds were wont thi Now stretched at length, close to

Soon as the pit he sees, he b,

And battle new, but all in So there he deeply lies, burnir.

TO KEEP A TRUE LENT.
Is this a fast, to keep
The larder lean,

And clean From fat of veals and sheep?

"As when Alcides from forced l.

The three-head Dog, and ma Basely the fiend did on his With serpent tail clappir,

At length arrived umi:

He shuts the day out :/ And swelling all in vain,

Is it to quit the dish

Of flesh, yet still

To fill

The platter high with fish ?

10

1 “For the word of the Lur any two-edged sword, piercin, soul and spirit, and of the jo the thoughts and intents of ilo

Is it to fast an hour,
Or rugg’d to go,

Or show
A downcast look and sour?

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either not at all decidable, and consequently not necessary to be believed one way or other; or they may be determined by Scripture. In a word, That all things necessary to be be. lieved are evidently contained in Scripture, and what is not there evidently contained, cannot be necessary to be believed. And our reason hereof is convincing, because nothing can challenge our belief, but what hath descended to us from Christ by Original and Universal Tradition: Now nothing but Scripture hath thus descended to us, Therefore nothing

but Scripture can challenge our belief. Now then to come Pint;

up closer to you, and to answer to your Question, not as you in:

put it, but as you should have put it: I say, That this Posihy Lent.

tion, Scripture alone is the Rule whereby they which believe it to be God's Word, are to judge all Controversies in Faith, is no

fundamental point, Though not for your Reasons: For, your ; Was two years younger

first and strongest reason, you see, is plainly voided and cut ...d to Catholicism when

off by my stating of the Question as I have done, and sup-converted by Laud, who

posing in it, that the parties at variance, are agreed about s 7 (Chillingworth dedicated

this, That the Scripture is the Word of God; and consemontitled “ The Religion of

quently that this is none of their Controversies. To your u Salvation.” It was written

second, That Controversie's cannot be ended without some living itled “Mercy and Truth, or

Authority, We have said already, that Necessary Controversies " Catholiques," the author of may be and are decided. And, if they be not ended, this is in prove Protestantism unsafe. not through defect of the Rule, but through the default of nained that those Protestants are Men. And, for these that cannot thus be onded, it is not pture as the only rule of faith, and necessary they should be ended. For, if God did require the in the traditions of an infallible ending of them, he would have provided some certain means

for the ending of them. And, to your Third, I say, that

Your pretence of using these means, is but hypocritical; for E APPEAL TO SCRIPTURE.

you use them with prejudice, and with a setled resolution not wav, The Scripture is the only Rule to judge to believe any thing which these means happily may suggest on by; me-thinks you should easily conceive, into you, if it any way cross your pre-conceived perswasion I be understood, of all those that are possible to of your Churche's Infallibility. You give not your selves . Scripture, and of those that arise among such liberty of judgment in the use of them, nor suffer your selves Die Scripture. For, if I had a Controversie with to be led by them to the Truth, to which they would lead you, *hether there were a God or no, I would not say, would you but be as willing to believe this consequence, Our ripture were a Rule to judge this by ; feeling that, Church doth oppose Scripture, therefore it doth err, therefore whether there be a God or no, he must needs doubt it is not infallible; as you are resolute to believe this, The I the Scripture be the Word of God: or, if he does | Church is infallible, therefore it doth not err, and therefore

urants the Question, and is not the man we speak of. it doth not oppose Scripture, though it seem to do so never wwise, if I had a Controversie about the Truth of Christ so plainly. *l. Jew, it would be vainly done of me, should I press with the Authority of the New Testament which he

Joseph Hall, born in 1574 at Ashby-de-la-Zouch *** not, until out of some principles common to us both,

in Leicestershire, was the son of an officer who had ind perswaded him that it is the Word of God. The New

the government of that town under the Earl of Tratament therefore, while he remains a Jew, would not be a

Huntingdon, then President of the North. He had Rule to decide this Controversie; in as much as that which

a devout mother, and was from infancy intended for is doubtrd of it self, is not fit to determine other doubts. So Lx wise, if there were any that believed Christian Religion,

the Church. He graduated at Cambridge, became and vet believed not the Bible to be the Word of God, though

fellow of Emanuel College, and published in 1597 they believed the matter of it to be true, (which is no impos

and 1598 a series of clever satires in English verse. E le supposition: for I may believe a Book of S. Austin's to

He also wrote, as a young man, a very clever untain nothing but the Truth of God, and yet not to have

Latin prose satire on the greed, drunkenness, and lyn inspired by God himself,) against such men therefore

folly of man, and on the virago type of woman, in the ti were no disputing out of the Bible; because nothing in the form of a description of an imaginary austral quration can be a proof to it self. When therefore we say, region, under the name of “ The World other and the

ripture is a sufficient means to determine all Controversies, same(Vundus Ilter et Idem). He was about to *** v not this, either to Atheists, Jews, Turks, or such become head-master of a school at Tiverton, when (hristians (if there be any such) as believe not Scripture to the rectory of Halsted in Suffolk was offered to him. to the Word of God. But among such men only, as are How he then got rid of a hindrance and found a ainady agreed upon this, that the Scripture is the Word of į help he has thus told in an autobiographical sketch, GA, we say, All Controversies that arise about Faith, are entitled “Soine Specialities in the Life of Joseph

Hall:”

This paseaze is given just as it was printed in 1637. It will be Warted that it differs very little from the custom now established in spring, brat more in punctuation and in the use of capitals and 40. Nobiy punctuated well before the Restoration,

“Having then fixed my foot in Halsted, I found there a dangerous opposite to the success of my ministry, a witty and bold atheist, one Jr. Lilley, who, by reason of his travels

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When the passing-bell doth toll,
And the furies in a shoal
Come to fright a parting soul,

Sweet Spirit, comfort me!

When the tapers now burn blue,
And the comforters are few,
And that number more than true,

Sweet Spirit, comfort me!

When the priest his last hath prayed, And I nod to what is said, 'Cause my speech is now decayed,

Sweet Spirit, comfort me!

TO HIS DEAR GOD.

I'll hope no more For things that will not come; And, if they do, they prove but cumbersome.

Wealth brings much woe; And, since it fortunes so, 'Tis better to be poor

Than so t'abound

As to be drowned
Or overwhelm’d with store.

Pale care, avant,
I'll learn to be content
With that small stock thy bounty gave or lent.

What may conduce
To my most healthful use,
Almighty God, me grant!

But that or this

That hurtful is
Deny thy suppliant.

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TO KEEP A TRUE LENT.
Is this a fast, to keep
The larder lean,

And clean From fat of veals and sheep?

When the Judgment is reveal’d,
And that open'd which was scal'd;
When to Thee I have appeal'd,

Sweet Spirit, comfort me!

Is it to quit the dish
Of flesh, yet still

To fill
The platter high with fish ?

TO DEATH. Thou bidst me come away, And I'll no longer stay, Than for to shed some tears For faults of former years ;

Is it to fast an hour,
Or ragy'd to go,

Or show
A downcast look and sour !

20

No: 'tis a fast, to dole

either not at all decidable, and consequently not necessary to Thy sheaf of wheat,

be believed one way or other; or they may be determined by And meat,

Scripture. In a word, That all things necessary to be beUnto the hungry soul;

lieved are evidently contained in Scripture, and what is not

there evidently contained, cannot be necessary to be believed. It is to fast from strife,

And our reason hereof is convincing, because nothing can From old debate

challenge our belief, but what hath descended to us from And hate

Christ by Original and Universal Tradition: Now nothing To circumcise thy life;

but Scripture hath thus descended to us, Therefore nothing To shew a heart grief-rent;

but Scripture can challenge our belief. Now then to come To starve thy sin,

up closer to you, and to answer to your Question, not as you Not bin:

put it, but as you should have put it: I say, That this PosiAnd that's to Keep thy Lent.

tion, Scripture alone is the Rule whereby they which believe it to be God's Word, are to judge all Controversies in Faith, is no

fundamental point, Though not for your Reasons: For, your William Chillingworth, who was two years younger

first and strongest reason, you see, is plainly voided and cut than Charles I., was converted to Catholicism when

off by my stating of the Question as I have done, and supa student at Oxford, but re-converted by Laud, who

posing in it, that the parties at variance, are agreed about was his godfather. In 1637 Chillingworth dedicated

this, That the Scripture is the Word of God; and conseto Charles I. a volume entitled “The Religion of

quently that this is none of their Controversies. To your Protestants a Safe Way to Salvation.” It was written

second, That Controversies cannot be ended without some liring in answer to a book entitled “Mercy and Truth, or Authority, We have said already, that Necessary Controversies Charity maintained by Catholiques,” the author of may be and are decided. And, if they be not ended, this is which had sought to prove Protestantism unsafe. not through defect of the Rule, but through the default of Chillingworth maintained that those Protestants are Men. And, for these that cannot thus be ended, it is not right who take Scripture as the only rule of faith, and necessary they should be ended. For, if God did require the do not seek rest in the traditions of an infallible ending of them, he would have provided some certain means Church.

for the ending of them. And, to your Third, I say, that

Your pretence of using these means, is but hypocritical; for THE APPEAL TO SCRIPTURE.

you use them with prejudice, and with a setled resolution not Yet when we say, The Scripture is the only Rule to judge to believe any thing which these means happily may suggest all Controversies by; me-thinks you should easily conceive, into you, if it any way cross your pre-conceived perswasion that we would be understood, of all those that are possible to of your Churche's Infallibility. You give not your selves be judged by Scripture, and of those that arise among such liberty of judgment in the use of them, nor suffer your selves as believe the Scripture. For, if I had a Controversie with to be led by them to the Truth, to which they would lead you, an Atheist whether there were a God or no, I would not say, would you but be as willing to believe this Consequence, Our that the Scripture were a Rule to judge this by ; feeling that, \ Church doth oppose Scripture, therefore it doth err, therefore doubting whether there be a God or no, he must needs doubt it is not infallible; as you are resolute to believe this, The whether the Scripture be the Word of God: or, if he does Church is infallible, therefore it doth not err, and therefore not, he grants the Question, and is not the man we speak of. it doth not oppose Scripture, though it seem to do so never So likewise, if I had a Controversie about the Truth of Christ | so plainly. with a Jew, it would be vainly done of me, should I press him with the Authority of the New Testament which he

Joseph Hall, born in 1574 at Ashby-de-la-Zouch believes not, until out of some principles common to us both,

in Leicestershire, was the son of an officer who had I had perswaded him that it is the Word of God. The New

| the government of that town under the Earl of Testament therefore, while he remains a Jew, would not be a fit Rule to decide this Controversie; in as much as that which

Huntingdon, then President of the North. He had is doubted of it self, is not fit to determine other doubts. So

a devout mother, and was from infancy intended for likewise, if there were any that believed Christian Religion,

the Church. He graduated at Cambridge, became and yet believed not the Bible to be the Word of God, though

fellow of Emanuel College, and published in 1597 they believed the matter of it to be true, (which is no impos

and 1598 a series of clever satires in English verse. sible supposition; for I may believe a Book of S. Austin's to

| He also wrote, as a young man, a very clever contain nothing but the Truth of God, and yet not to have

Latin prose satire on the greed, drunkenness, and been inspired by God himself,) against such men therefore folly of man, and on the virago type of woman, in there were no disputing out of the Bible; because nothing in the form of a description of an imaginary austral question can be a proof to it self. When therefore we say, region, under the name of “ The World other and the Scripture is a sufficient means to determine all ('ontroversies, same” (Mundus Alter et Idem). He was about to we say not this, either to Atheists, Jews, Turks, or such become head-master of a school at Tiverton, when Christians (if there be any such) as believe not Scripture to the rectory of Halsted in Suffolk was offered to him. be the Word of God. But among such men only, as are How he then got rid of a hindrance and found a already agreed upon this, that the Scripture is the Word of help he has thus told in an autobiographical sketch, God, we say, All Controversies that arise about Faith, are entitled “Some Specialities in the Life of Joseph

Hall:"_

1 This passage is given just as it was printed in 1637. It will be observed that it differs very little from the custom now established in spelling, but more in punctuation and in the use of capitals and italics. Nobody punctuated well before the Restoration.

“Having then fixed my foot in Halsted, I found there a dangerous opposite to the success of my ministry, a witty and bold atheist, one Jr. Lilley, who, by reason of his travels and abilities of discourse and behaviour, had so deeply insinuated himself into my patron, Sir Robert Drury, that

HALL'S MEDITATIONS. there was small hopes (during his entireness) for me to work

Upon the Sight of Gold melted. any good upon that noble patron of mine, who, by the sug

This gold is both the fairest and most solid of all metals; gestion of this wicked detractor, was set off from me before

yet is the soonest melted with the fire: others, as they are he knew me. Hereupon, I confess, finding the obdurateness

coarser, so more churlish, and hard to be wrought upon by a and hopeless condition of that man, I bent my prayers against

dissolution. him, beseeching God daily, that he would be pleased to re

Thus a sound and good heart is most easily melted into move, by some means or other, that apparent hinderance of

sorrow and fear by the sense of God's judgments; whereas my faithful labours, who gave me an answer accordingly :

the carnal mind is stubborn and remorseless. All metals are for this malicious man going hastily to London to exasperate

but earth, yet some are of finer temper than others; all hearts my patron against me, was then and there swept away by the

are of flesh, yet some are, through the power of grace, more pestilence, and never returned to do any farther mischief.

capable of spiritual apprehensions. Now the coast was clear before me, and I gained every day of

O God, we are such as thou wilt be pleased to make us. the good opinion and favourable respects of that honourable

Give me a heart that may be sound for the truth of grace, gentleman and my worthy neighbours. Being now, therefore,

and melting at the terrors of thy law; I can be for no other settled in that sweet and civil country of Suffolk, near to St.

than thy sanctuary on earth, or thy treasury of heaven. Edmund's Bury, my first work was to build up my house, which was extremely ruinous; which done, the uncouth soli.

Upon the sight of a Tree full blossomed. tariness of my life, and the extreme incommodity of that single housekeeping, drew my thoughts, after two years, to

Here is a tree overlaid with blossoms: it is not possible conclescend to the necessity of a married estate, which God

| that all these should prosper; one of them must needs rub no less strangely provided for me; for, walking from the

the other of moisture and growth. I do not love to se church on Monday in the Whitsun week, with a grave and

an infancy over-hopeful : in these pregnant beginnings one reverend minister, Mr. Grandidge, I saw a comely and modest

faculty starves another, and at last leaves the mind saplex gentlewoman standing at the door of that house where we

and barren. As therefore we are wont to pull off some of the were invited to a wedding dinner, and inquiring of that

too frequent blossoms, that the rest may thrive; so it is good worthy friend whether he knew her. Yes (quoth he), I know

wisdom to moderate the early excess of the parts, or progress her well, and have bespoken her for your wife. When I

of over-forward childhood. farther demanded an account of that answer, he told me, she

Neither is it otherwise in our Christian profession: a was the daughter of a gentleman whom he much respected,

sudden and lavish ostentation of grace may fill the eye with Mr. George Winniff, of Bretenham; that out of an opinion

wonder, and the mouth with talk, but will not at the last till hail of the fitness of that match for me, he had already

the lap with fruit. Let me not promise too much, nor rais treated with her father about it, whom he found very apt to

too high expectations of my undertakings. I had rather me entertain it, advising me not to neglect the opportunity; and

should complain of my small hopes, than of my short per not concealing the just praises of modesty, piety, good dis

formances. position, and other virtues that were lodged in that seemly presence. I listened to the motion as sent from God, and at

Upon occasion of a Red-breast coming into a Chamber. last, upon due prosecution, happily prevailed, enjoying the

Pretty bird, how cheerfully dost thou sit and sing, and y comfortable society of that meet help for the space of forty

knowest not where thou art, nor where thou shalt make ti nine years."

next meal, and at night must shroud thyself in a bush 1

lodging: what a shame it is for me, that see before me From Halsted Joseph Hall passed to Waltham

liberal provisions of my God, and find myself set warm up Holy Cross in Essex, which living he held for two

my own roof, yet am ready to droop under a distrustful and-twenty years, having added to it a prebend in

unthankful dulness! Had I so little certainty of my hart Wolverhampton Church, and in 1616 the Deanery of

and purveyance, how heartless should I be, how caret Worcester. He was one of the divines sent to the

How little list should I have to make music to thee.

myself! Synod of Dort. In 1624 he refused the Bishopric

Surely thou camest not hither without a providence: of Gloucester, but accepted that of Exeter in 1627,

sent thee, not so much to delight, as to shame me; but a and in November, 1641, was translated to Norwich.

a conviction of my sullen unbelief, who under more app In that year the chief argument before the nation

means am less cheerful and confident. Reason and faith was upon the subject of Episcopacy. Bishop Hall

not done so much in me, as in thee mere instinct of ne wrote a pamphlet upon it, which brought Milton

Want of foresight makes thee more merry, if not
Wan

. into controversy with him. In December, 1641, the

happy, here, than the foresight of better things maketh Parliament sent to the Tower Joseph Hall and other

O God, thy providence is not impaired by those i bishops who protested against their exclusion from | thou hast given me above these brute things: let n the House of Loriis. Six months afterwards he was greater helps hinder me from an holy security and com released on bail, but stripped of his dignities, and able reliance upon thee. he spent the last nine years of his life on a little farm at Heigham, near Norwich. Joseph Hall died

I'pon the Sight of a Dark Lanthorn. in 1656, aged eighty-two.

There is light indeed, but so shut up as if it were Thomas Fuller wrote of Joseph Hall in his

when the side is most open, there is light enough . “Worthies," _“He was commonly called our English direction to him that bears it, none to others; he can Seneca, for the pureness, plainness, and fulness of his

another man by that light which is cast before b style; not unhappy at Controversies, better in his

another man cannot discern him. Sermons, best of all in his Meditations.'”

Right such is reserved knowledge; no man is the be

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