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and official proceedings and for all acts required by and in pursuance of law to be performed at or within a prescribed time.

The General Construction Law of this state provides as follows:

“ Sec. 52. Time, standard. The standard time throughout this state is that of the seventy-fifth meridian of longitude west from Greenwich, and all courts and public officers, and legal and official proceedings, shall be regulated thereby.

“Sec. 53. Time, use of standard. Any act required by or in pursuance of law to be performed at or within a prescribed time, shall be performed according to the standard time.”

It is according to this standard time in this State that our courts have convened; that our public offices, schools, polls on election day and banks have been opened and closed, and that the hour of delivery has been fixed for all stocks, bonds, warehouse certificates and other evidences of ownership of property bought and sold on the exchanges. In fact, the official, industrial, business and social life of the State has conformed to it in daily work and engagement.

The new Federal statute purports to establish a standard time governing not only the movement of all common carriers engaged in Interstate Commerce but it provides that

" In all statutes, orders, rules and regulations relating to the time of performance of any act by any officer or department of the United States whether in the legislative, executive or judicial branches of the government or relating to the time within which any rights may accrue or determine, or within which any act shall or shall not be performed by any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, it shall be understood and intended that the time shall be the United States Standard Time of the zone within which the act is to be performed.”

It is apparent that this Federal act does not purport to establish a standard time governing the courts and public officers of this State nor our legal and official proceedings nor the performance of acts required by or in pursuance of our State law to be performed at or within a prescribed time. Moreover, it seems clear that the Federal Government lacks the jurisdiction to prescribe any standard time affecting all legal and official acts and proceedings, both State and Federal, within this State. The State of New York has authority to precribe its own standard time for its courts and public officers and for its legal and official acts and proceedings.

Therefore, unless our statute prescribing standard time throughout this State is amended to conform to the Act of Con

gress, much confusion will result in this State after the thirty-first of March next, when the Federal act goes into effect. I believe it is a matter of general public impression that the Federal statute will prescribe the only standard time for all purposes throughout the United States and that the public are unaware of the conflict which will exist if our State law is not amended.

Believing it to be our duty to prevent any unnecessary conflict of law with respect to a matter of such universal interest and so far as possible establish a standard time for all purposes throughout the State, I respectively recommend to your honorable bodies that section 52 of the General Construction Law, which defines the standard time throughout this State be amended so as to provide as follows:

“ Section 52. Time, Standard. The standard time throughout this State is that of the seventy-fifth meridian of longitude west from Greenwich, except that at two o'clock ante-meridian of the last Sunday in March of each year such standard time throughout this state shall be advanced one hour, and at two o'clock antemeridian of the last Sunday in October of each year such standard time throughout this state shall, by the retarding of one hour, be returned to the mean astronomical time of the seventy-fifth meridian of longitude west from Greenwich, and all courts and public officers, and legal and official proceedings, shall be regulated thereby."

Therefore, in accordance with the provisions of section 15 of article III of the Constitution, and by virtue of the authority thereby. conferred upon me, I do hereby certify to the necessity of the immediate passage of Assembly bill (Int. No. 1230) entitled "An act to amend the General Construction Law, in relation to standard time."

Given under my hand and the Privy Seal of the State at

the Capitol in the city of Albany this twenty-seventh [L. s.] day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand

nine hundred and eighteen.

(Signed) CHARLES S. WHITMAN. By the Governor: WM. A. ORR,

Secretary to the Governor.

A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

STATE OF NEW YORK - EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,

ALBANY, March 28, 1918. To the Senate:

I return herewith, without my approval, Senate bill (Int. No. 267, Printed No. 277) entitled “An act to amend the Banking Law, in relation to power of banks, trust companies and investment companies.”

The provisions in this bill are exactly the same as those contained in Assembly bill (Int. No. 312, Printed No. 355) which was approved on March 27th, and became chapter 98 of the Laws of 1918.

(Signed) CHARLES S. WHITMAN.

IN SENATE, March 28, 1918. Mr. Sage, from the committee on finance, to which was referred the nomination of Elizabeth Drake Hazel of Buffalo as a manager of the Buffalo State Hospital, reported the same to the Senate for confirmation.

Mr. Graves moved that the said nomination be confirmed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Sage, from the committee on finance, to which was referred the nomination of Rudolph C. Briggs of Rome as a manager of the Rome Custodial Asylum, reported the same to the Senate for confirmation.

Mr. Wicks moved that the said nomination be confirmed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Sage, from the committee on finance, to which was referred the nominations of Jesse B. Durston of Syracuse, Ida Strauss Marshall of Syracuse, and Clara A. Walters of Syracuse as managers of the Syracuse State Institution for Feeble-Minded Children, reported the same to the Senate for confirmation.

Mr. Walters moved that the said nominations be confirmed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Sage, from the committee on finance, to which was referred the nomination of Emily Johnson of Islip as a member of the Central Islip State Hospital, reported the same to the Senate for confirmation.

Mr. G. F. Thompson moved that the said nomination be confirmed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Sage, from the committee on finance, to which was referred the nomination of Elizabeth Kellogg of New York Mills as a manager of the Utica State Hospital, reported the same to the Senate for confirmation.

Mr. Wicks moved that the said nomination be confirmed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agres to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Sage, from the committee on finance, to which was referred the nomination of Bessie Boasberg of Buffalo as a trustee of the New York State Hospital for the Treatment of Incipient Pulmonary Tuberculosis, reported the same to the Senate for confirmation.

Mr. Gibbs moved that the said nomination be confirmed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Sage, from the committee on finance, to which was referred the nomination of Arthur W. Lawrence of Bronxville as a manager of the New York State Reformatory for Women, reported the same to the Senate for confirmation.

Mr. Sage moved that the said nomination be confirmed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

STATE OF NEW YORK — EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,

ALBANY, April 1, 1918. To the Legislature:

I have the honor to transmit to you herewith the Thirty-fifth Annual Report of the State Civil Service Commission for the year nineteen hundred and seventeen.

CHARLES S. WIIITMAN.

A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

STATE OF NEW YORK — EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,

ALBANY, April 8, 1918.

To the Senate:

I hereby nominate as a justice of the Supreme Court of and for the First Judicial District Nathan Ottinger of New York city, to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Francis M. Scott.

(Signed) CHARLES S. WHITMAN.

Mr. Sage moved that the said nomination be confirmed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

STATE OF NEW YORK — EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,

ALBANY, April 8, 1918. To the Senate:

I hereby nominate as a manager of the Hudson River State Hospital Daniel J. Gleason of Poughkeepsie, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Horatio N. Bain.

(Signed) CHARLES S. WHITMAN.

Mr. Towner moved that the said nomination be confirmed.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the affirmative.

A message from the Governor, at the hands of his secretary, was received and read in the words following:

STATE OF NEW YORK -- EXECUTIVE CHAMBER,

ALBANY, April , 1918. To the Legislature:

I desire to call your attention to the returns of the number of voters registered in the various cities on the 5th and 6th of April, 1918, for the local option elections. Such returns indicate that in nearly all of the cities there are districts in which there are 700 and in some there are many as 1,500 registered

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