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Prayer was offered by Rev. Dr. Halley.

The Senators 'present having taken and subscribed the constitutional oath of office, the President addressed the Senate as follows:

SENATORS The Constitution of this State makes the LieutenantGovernor the presiding officer of the Senate. In entering upon the

. duties of the office I am not unmindful of the labors and responsibil. ities it imposes, or of the great importance of a faithful and intelligent discharge of its many and delicate obligations. Rules are made chiefly to facilitate the public business and to guard the rights of the minority; the majority protects itself by its own inherent power. It shall be my purpose to administer the rules you may adopt for your government with firmness, impartiality, and a sacred regard for the rights and privileges of every Senator. Coming to the chair with some experience in siinilar duties, and with an earnest purpose to discharge every obligation faithfully and conscientiously, I shall yet rely for success upon your generous aid and support, and shall hope for such co-operation and such intercourse in all relations as will render the session pleasant to ourselves and advantageous to the people. I need not remind you of your high prerogatives and duties as the representatives of this great State the foremost in the Union in population, wealth, and commercial importance. Responsibility is inseparably associated with power, and the party to which has been contided the complete control of the executive, administrative, and legislative departments of the State Government, will justly be held to a strict accountability for the mamer in which it fulfills this exalted trust. The character of the legislation will depend largely upon this body, and you will permit me to suggest and urge the value and importance of early action on the more pressing questions which demand your attention. By this timely disposition you will avoid the hasty, inconsiderate and injurious results which too often mark the postponement of legislation to the closing hours of the session. I venture only one further suggestion : You legislate not for an hour, or a day, but stamp your impress upon the future. You can do much to make or mar the greatest of American Commonwealths, and will bear a part in molding the destiny of the whole country. Your acts, as they shall ripen into laws, will bring good fruits; or, if unsound, will carry through the coming years the taint of the seeds you sow, and this reflection constantly cherished will deepen your sense of responsibility. Invoking the guidance and protection of the Supreme Ruler of us all, recognizing that from His hand flows every good and every blessing, I have but to add that the Senate is now organized and ready to proceed to business.

Mr. Mills offered the following:

Resolved, That John W. Vrooman be and he is hereby appointed
Clerk of the Senate.

Mr. Fowler moved to amend by striking out the name of “John
W. Vrooman " and inserting “George Moss."
The President put the question whether the Senate would

agree

to said motion, and it was decided in the negative.

The President then put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative, as follows:

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Mr. Vrooman appeared and took the constitutional oath of office. Mr. Lord offered the following:

Resolved, That John W. Corning be and he is hereby appointed sergeant-at-arms of the Senate.

Mr. Fowler moved to amend by striking out the name of “John W. Corning" and inserting “ John Decker.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the negative.

The President then put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Rockwell offered the following:

Resolved, That James I. Hart be and he is hereby appointed assistant sergeant-at-arms and postmaster of the Senate.

Mr, Fowler moved to amend by striking out the name of “James I. Hart” and inserting “ Joseph Holdrich.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the negative.

The President then put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Sessions offered the following :

Resolved, That La Fayette G. Sweet be and he hereby is appointed assistant postmaster of the Senate for the sessions of 1880 and 1881.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Wagner offered the following:

Resolved, That James G. Caw be and he is hereby appointed doorkeeper of the Senate for the sessions of 1880 and 1881.

Mr. Fowler moved to amend the resolution by striking out the name of “James G. Caw” and inserting “Lawrence Arnold.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the negative.

The President then put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative. Mr. Davenport offered the following:

Resolved, That Leander Allerton be appointed assistant door-keeper of the Senate for the sessions of 1850 and 1881.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Loomis offered the following:

Resolved, That Robert H. Wiley, of Livingston county, be and is hereby appointed assistant door-keeper of the Senate for the sessions of 1880 and 1881.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Rockwell offered the following:

Resolved, That Squire A. Warren be and is hereby appointed assistant door-keeper of the Senate for the sessions of 1880 and 1881.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Madden offered the following:

Resolved, That James Gowdy, of Orange county, be and is hereby appointed assistant door-keeper of the Senate.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Forster offered the following:

Resolved, That Benjamin H. Seeley be and he is hereby appointed one of the four clerks of committees to serve under the direction of the clerk of the Senate upon the remaining committees of the Senate under section 1 of chapter 379 of the Laws of 1879.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Schroeder offered the following:

Resolved, That Frank Coon be and he is hereby appointed one of the clerks of the committees to serve under the direction of the clerk of the Senate upon the committees of the Senate under section 1 of chapter 379 of the Laws of 1879.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Halbert offered the following:

Resolved, That. Frank H. McKinnon be and he is hereby appointed one of the general committee clerks of the Senate to serve under the direction of the clerk of the Senate pursuant to chapter 379 of the Laws of 1879, for the sessions of 1880 and 1881.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Birdsall offered the following:

Resolved, That Isaac Coles be and he is hereby apppointed one of the general committee clerks to serve under the direction of the clerk of the Senate pursuant to chapter 379 of the Laws of 1879.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Wagner offered the following:

Resolved, That Nelson Parker be and he is hereby appointed janitor of the Senate chamber for the sessions of 1880 and 1881.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Winslow offered the following:

Resolved, That Hudson C. Tanner be and he hereby is appointed stenographer to the Senate.

Mr. Fowler moved to amend the resolution by striking out the name of “Hudson C. Tanner” and inserting “Duncan C. McMillan."

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said motion, and it was decided in the negative.

The President then put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Braman offered the following:

Resolved, That the Rev. Dr. Ebenezer Halley be appointed chaplain of the Senate for the sessions of 1880 and 1881, and that his compensation be the sum of five hundred dollars ($500) per session.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative, as follows:

Astor
Birdsall
Bixby
Braman
Davenport
Eidman
Forster
Fowler

FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE.
Halbert

McCarthy
Hogan

Mills
Jacobs

Murtha
Loomis

Pitts
Lord

Robertson
Lynde

Rockwell
Madden

Schroeder

Seebacher
Sessions
Stevens
Wagner
Wendover
Williams
Winslow

29

Mr. Pitts offered the following:

Resolved, That James Murray, of Rochester, be and hereby is appointed assistant janitor of the Senate for the sessions of 1880 and 1881.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Sessions offered the following:

Resolved, That Robert W. Bemis be and he is hereby appointed post-office messenger of the Senate for the sessions of 1880 and 1881.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

Mr. Sessions offered the following:

Resolved, That the clerk of the Senate make the usual arrangements for the payment of postage on all papers received and sent out by Senators, and also on all public documents sent out by Senators and officers during the session. The postage on any document not to exceed forty cents; and also to send by express any document costing over forty cents.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative as follows:

Astor
Birdsall
Braman
Davenport
Eidman
Forster
Fowler

FOR THE AFFIRMATIVE.
Halbert

Mills
Jacobs

Pitts
Loomis

Robertson
Lord

Rockwell
Lynde

Schroeder
Madden

Seebacher
McCarthy Sessions

Stevens
Strahan
Wagner
Wendover
Williams
Winslow

27

Mr. Wendover offered the following:

Resolved, That the Senate meet at eleven o'clock A. M. until otherwise ordered.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to aid resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

The President announced the following appointments :
President's Clerk-James B. Butler, of New York.
President's Messenger-- Michael N. Hollenbeck, of Erie.
Mr. McCarthy offered the following:

Resolved, That a committee of two be appointed to wait upon His Excellency the Governor, and inform him that the Senate is organized and ready to proceed to business.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

The President announced as such committee Messrs. McCarthy and Jacobs.

Mr. Halbert offered the following :

Resolved, That a committee of two be appointed to wait upon the honorable the Assembly, and inform that body that the Senate is organized and ready to proceed to business.

The President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

The President announced as such committee Messrs. Halbert and Hogan.

Mr. Robertson offered the following:

Resolved, That the rules of the last Senate with the following amendments be adopted for the government of this Senate until otherwise ordered.

In subdivision 2 of rule 16 strike out the word “five" and insert in lieu thereof the word “ seven”. In subdivision 6 same rule strike out the word “five” and insert in lieu thereof the word “seven". In subdivision 11 same rule strike out the word “ three "and insert “five”.

By unanimous consent, the rules were suspended, the President put the question whether the Senate would agree to said resolution, and it was decided in the affirmative.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Forster asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled “ An act to amend chapter 147 of the laws of 1876 entitled " An act granting to the United States the right to acquire the right of way necessary for the improvement of the Hudson river and Spuyten Duyvil creek from the North river to the East river through the Harlem Kills and ceding jurisdiction over the same, as amended by chapter 345 of the laws of 1879,” which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on judiciary, when appointed.

On motion of Mr. Forster and by unanimous consent, said bill was ordered printed.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Seebacher asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to exempt charitable institutions from the payment of water tax," which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on the affairs of cities, when appointed.

By unanimous consent, Mr. Forster asked and obtained leave to introduce a bill entitled "An act to amend chapter 50 of the Laws of 1848 entitled “ An act to authorize the formation of corporations for manufacturing, mining, mechanical and chemical purposes, which was read the first time, and by unanimous consent was also read the second time, and referred to the committee on miscellaneous corporations, when appointed.

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