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6 MR. SPECTATOR, I am a man of a very good estate, and am honourably in love. I hope you will allow, when the ultimate purpose is honest, there may be, without trespass against innocence, some toying by the way. People of condition are perhaps too distant and formal on those occasions ; but however that is, I am to confess to you that I have writ some verses to atone for my offence. You professed authors are a little severe upon us, who write like gentlemen : but if you are a friend to love, you will insert my poem. You cannot imagine how much service it would do me with my fair-one as well as reputation with all my friends, to have something of mine in the Spectator. My crime was, that I snatched a kiss, and my poetical excuse as follows:

Belinda, see from yonder flowers

The bee flies loaded to its cell;
Can you perceive what it devours?

Are they impaird in show or smell?

So, though I robb'd you of a kiss,

Sweeter than their ambrosial dew;
Why are you angry at my bliss ?

Has it at all impoverish'd you?

1

'Tis by this cunning I contrive,

In spite of your unkind reserve,
To keep my famish'd love alive,
Which you inhumanly would starve."

. I am, SIR,
- Your humble servant,

TIMOTHY STANZA,

SIR

Aug. 23, 1712. • Having a little time upon my hands, I could not think of bestowing it better, than in writing an epistle to the Spectator, which I now do, and am,

SIR,
- Your humble servant,

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· P. S. If you approve of my style, I ain likely enough to become your correspondent. I desire your opinion of it. I design it for that way of writing called by the judicious “ the familiar.”

T.

STEELE.

INDEX.

416

No.
AcetUs, his character......

422
Admiration, a pleasing motion of the mind...

413
Affectation, the misfortune of it........

.......

404
Described

460
Almighty, his power over the imagination.

421
Aristotle's saying of his being

465
Allegories, like light to a discourse..

421
Eminent writers faulty in them.

421
Allusions, the great art of a writer.

421
Amazons, their commonwealth....

433
How they educated their children.

434
Their wars.....

434
They marry their male allies ......

434
Americans used painting instead of writing..
Amity between agreeable persons of different sexes
dangerous....

400
Amoret the jilt reclaimed by Philander

401
Anne Boleyne's last letter to king Henry VIII...

397
Ancients in the east, their way of living........
Appearances. Things not to be trusted for them....... 464
Applause (public) its pleasure..

442
April (month of) described ...

425
Arabella, verses on her singing.

443
Architecture, the ancients' perfection in it..

The greatness of the manner how it strikes the
fancy.

415
Of the manner of both ancients and moderns ... 415
The concave and convex figures have the greatest
air.....

415
Every thing that pleases the imagination in it, is
either great, beautiful, or new ........

415

415

415

426

No
Art (works of) defective to entertain the imagination 414

Receive great advantage from their likeness to
those of nature

414
August and July (months of) described...

425
BABEL, (Tower of)

415
Bacon (Sir Francis) prescribes his reader a poem or
prospect, as conducive to health

411
What he says of the pleasure of taste

447
Bankruptcy, the misery of it............

428, 456
Bar-oratory in England, reflections on it.....

407
Basilius Valentinus, and his son, their story.
Baxter (Mr.) his last words....

445
More last words........

445
Bayle (Mr.) what he says of libels.

451
Bear-garden, a combat there..

436
The cheats of it.........

449
Beauty heightened by motion....

406
Beauty of objects, what understood by it..

412
Nothing makes its way more directly to the soul.. 412
Every species of sensible creatures has different
notions of it....

412
A second kind of it...

412
Beggars, the grievance of them.........

430
Belvidera, a critique on a song upon her...

470
Belus, Jupiter, temple of......

415
Birds, how affected by colours .

412
Blast (Lady) her character......

457
Bluemantle (Lady) an account of her......

427
Buck (Timothy) his answer to 'James Miller's chal-
lenge......

436
Buffoonery censured..

443
Business (men of) their error in similitudes.

421
Of learning fittest for it..........

469
Bussy d'Amboise, a story of him.....

467
CÆSAR lost his life by neglecting a Roman augur's cau-
tion...

395
Cælia, her character. ......

404
Calisthenes, his character....

422
Calumny, the ill effects of it..

451
Camilla's letter to the Spectator from Venice.... 443
How applauded there

443
Cartesian, how he would account for the ideas formed

...........

404

No.
by the fancy, from a single circumstance of the
memory...

417
Cato, the respect paid him at the Roman theatre 446
Chamont's saying of Monimia's misfortunes.............. 395
Charity schools to be encouraged...

430
Charles II, his gaieties......

462
Charms, none can supply the place of virtue..

395
Children, their duty to their parents.......

426
Ill education of them fatal..

431
Chinese laugh at our gardens, and why

414
Chloe, the idiot........

466
Chremylus, his character out of Aristophanes. 464
Cicero, his genius ....

404
The oracle's advice to him.

404
What he says of scandal..

427
Of the Roman gladiators .

436
Clarendon (Earl of) his character of a person of a
troublesome curiosity...

439
Cleanthes, his character....
Cleopatra, a description of her sailing down the Cyd-
nos..........

400
Colours, the eye takes most delight in them ............. 412

Why the poets borrow most epithets from them.. 412
Only ideas in the mind

413
Speak all languages....

416
Comedies, English, vicious

446
Commonwealth of Amazons...

433
Compassion civilizes human nature

397
How to touch it......

397
Company, temper chiefly to be considered in the choice
of it......

424
Concave and convex figures in architecture have the
greatest air, and why.....

415
Confidence, the danger of it to the ladies....

395
Coverley (Sir Roger de) his adventure with Sukey...... 410
His good humour.......

424
Conversation, an improvement of taste in letters....... 409
Country life, why the poets in love with it.

414
What Horace and Virgil say of it..

414
Rules for it........

424
Courage wants other good qualities to set it off. 422
Court and city, their peculiar ways of life and conver-
sation

403
Critics (French) friends to one another.......

409
Cuckoldom abused on the stage.

446
VOL. VI,

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