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showing the Excellencies, Temptations, By the late Rev. R. Sheppherd, D.D. Graces, and Duties of the Christian Hus- Archdeacon of Bedford. Weston. 8vo. bandman. By Richard Steele, A. M. - The doctrine contended for in these Fifth Edition. Edinburgh. Brown. discourses we believe to be in strict 12mo. 3s. 6d. This is a new edition of a accordance with Scripture, as it will well-known and very excellent work, by ever be dear to the best feelings of the one of the Nonconformist ministers. It human heart. It is treated in a suis marked by the characteristic quaint- perior manner by the deceased author, ness of the period, and carries the alle- whose son has re-published the disgorizing principle too far ; but there is courses, “ with the hope and intention an excellent spirit in the work, and a of affording consolation to those drooplarge portion of truly valuable practical ing under affliction's heaviest holt.” We instruction. It is an excellent vestry trust they may, in some measure, anlibrary book.

swer this purpose. THE CHRISTIAN INSTRUCTOR ; con- A BRIEF DESCRIPTIVE HISTORY OF taining a brief but comprehensive View HOLLAND, in Letters from Grandfather of the Evidences, Doctrines, Duties, Er- to Marianne, during an Excursion in the ternal Economy, and Prospects of the Summer of 1819. 12mo. 2s. 6d. WightChristian Religion, in the Form of Ques- man and Cramp.--Without any pretention and Answer. By G. Croft. Lon. sions to research, the author of this little don. 12mo, 3s. 6d.-We ought to have volume has presented his young readers noticed this little volume before. It is with much novel and useful informafitted to be very useful to the higher tion respecting the customs and country forms of Sunday School scholars, and, of our Dutch neighbours, which will in many respects, to the teachers them- doubtless tend to endear our beautiful selves. The arrangement is, on the country and its untold privileges to whole, good, and the answers generally every reflecting mind. We can cordiboth scriptural and distinct.

ally recommend it as containing inTue SHEPHERD

formation enough to have made, in the

OF ISRAEL: A hands of a professed author of travels, a Practical Exposition and Improvement of handsome Octavo. the Twenty-third Psalm. By J. Thornton, of Billericay. London. 'W. Baynes. PASTORAL BEREAVEMENT Improved : 12mo. Is. 6d.

A Funeral Oration, delivered at the InPAGWICKE: or the Beginning of Hope. terment of the late Rev. Peter Samuel Edinbureh. Waugh and Innes. 12mo. Charrier, at High Street Chupel, Lan2s. 6d.

caster, April 3, 1826, by W. M. Walker; OTAHEITE: or a Narrative of the and a Funeral Sermon, preached, on the Progress of the Gospel in the South Sea following Lord's Day, to the bereaved Islands. Edinburgh. Waugh and Innes." Church and Congregation, in Bethesda 18mo. 15.

Chapel, Liverpool, by W. Roby. LonThe SHIPWRECK of the Apostle Paul. don. Westley and Davies. The sudLondon. Hamilton. 18mo. 4d.

den and unexpected death of Mr. CharFORCIBLE REASONS for receiving the rier we noticed in our April number. Divine Authority of the Holy Scriptures; We are glad to see the present mecompiled for the Use of Young Persons. morials of so excellent and useful a London. Hatchard. 18mo.

man. We recommend them very cor. All these small but useful publica dially; but, as they contain no account tions we recommend to the notice of our of the deceased, we hope some of our young friends, or of those who distri- friends will furnish us with a biographibute books among the young. All our cal article, when these respectable testiexcellent friend Thornton's publications monies, to his worth will be appropriare worthy of his sound practical judg. ately introduced. ment. The Shepherd of Israel will be

· APOCRYPHAL CONTROVERSY. found not unworthy of the character which he has long and honourably sus

STATEMENTS OF DISSENTIENT MEM. tained. It, we should remark, is adapt

BERS of the Committee of the Edinburgh ed to instruct the old, as well as to

Bible Society, in reference to its Separaplease the young.

tion from the British and Foreign Bible

Society, and Publication of its Second DISCOURSES ON A FUTURE Ex- Statement. Edinburgh. Brown. 8vo. · ISTENCE, tending to establish the Doc- LETTERS IN DEFENCE OF THE BRItrine of a Recognition of each other. TISH AND FOREIGN BIBLE SOCIETY,

addressed to a Friend in the Country, we have little doubt as to its final issue, Letter First, on the Fundamental Law At present we merely give the titles of the of the Society. Letter Second. Edin pamphlets which have appeared since burgh. Wilson. 8vo.

our last article was published, reserving Two LETTERS ADDRESSED TO THE to ourselves the power of adverting to Rev. G. C. GORHAM, on some points of the subject again, should it be necessary. his Statement on the Apocryphal Books, In the mean time, however, we recomand on some of the alleged Doctrines of mend to our readers the able pamphlet the Ronnish Church. By Leander Van by Mr. Gorham, in which some most

Ess, D.D. With a Reply, by George important discussion will be found on Cornelius Gorham, B.A. London. Seeley. certain points, between the Ronianists 8vo. .

and Protestants, which this controversy The last Annual Meeting of the Bri, has brought into view. tish and Foreign Bible Society has, we W e understand that the Letters in trust, set the Apocryphal question in Defence of the British and Foreign the Bible Society for ever to rest. The Bible Society have been attributed to exclusion of the Apocrypha is now de- the writer of the article on the Apocryclared to be the law of the Society, and phal controversy which appeared in our the determination of its Committee. April number. Without expressing, at We hear of none who are dissatisfied, present, any opinion on those letters, we but the authors and defenders of the beg to correct this mistake. The author Second Edinburgh Statement, who have of those letters is entirely unknown to issued, but not published, a Third us, and has no connection with the conStatement. The controversy is not ducting of our work, likely to terminate in Sotland soon; but

RELIGIOUS INTELLIGENCE.

PROTESTANT Society FOR THE PRO

The appearance of their Lordships, and of TECTION OF RELIGIOUS LIBERTY. John Wilks, Esq., the other Secretary to The Fifteenth Anniversary of this im. the Society, was greeted with loud and portant Society was held on Saturday, continued cheering. May 13, at the City of London Tavern. Dr. BROWN soon proposed that the reThe great room was filled to excess, at an maining portion of the Minutes should be early hour, by a most respectable assem- omitted, and that Mr. Wilks should be blage of ministers and gentlemen, many of requested to begin his usual address. whom came expressly from different parts Mr. John Wilks then rose, and was of the country. Some noblemen and gen. received by the meeting with enthusiastic tlemen attended from France and Ger- cheering, which continued for a' consimany, North and South America, and derable time. The greetings having at other distant countries, as well Catho- length subsided, he commenced an ad. lic as Protestant, with some liberal dress that continued for more than three clergymen of the Established Church, hours, and which was remarkable for its who, though of different nations, and eloquence and force. There was no susdifferent religious sentiments, were anxious pension of interest and pleasure, and the to evince their general love of religious frequent plaudits of the assembly evinced freedom,

the vast gratification received. Our limits About eleven o'clock ROBERT STE- will not permit us to introduce the whole VEN, Esq., the 'Treasurer, took the chair of the admirable speech. An accurate He stated the object for which they were outline may be given; the expression, coassembled ; congratulated the Meeting on louring, and effect it would be vain to the exalted individual, the Marquis of attempt. When applause was hushed, he Lansdowne, who had promised to preside, said, I feel on this occasion unusually and whose arrival he hoped would soon opprest. I resemble a being long absent, be announced ; and concluded by request- but returning to his native vale. To the ing T. Pellatt, Esq., one of their Secre. heart its scenes were ever sacred. He taries, to read the Minutes of the Com- had navigated the calm lake and tempestmittee during the past year.

beaten sea; he had abode amid the glaMr. PellATT commenced such Report ciers of Chamouny, and toiled to the sumof their proceedings, when, in a few mi- mit of Mont Blanc ; but everywhere and nutes, the Marquis of Lansdowne entered ever, whether at moonlight he trod the the room, accompanied by Lord Dacrę. Roman Forum, or sigued at sunset amid

the ruins of some Grecian temple, that and noblest spirits, we will often visit the native valley was present to his mind. tombs of the departed, and there rene v Amid her sylvan charms, painted by ima. our vow never to desert the cause gination, with a vivid pencil, two vene- they cherished, but transmit to future rable trees, beneath which he had re- ages the sacred flame of freedom unclined conversed, and thought, were ever extinguished and unlessened, beaming prominent and dear. Half way up the more widely and more bright! hill there grew the majestic and wide. On these occasions I have been accusspreading beach; and in the centre of the tomed to refer to cases mentioned at a green stood the giant oak, under whose previous meeting, but then undecided : antique arms the aged had grown grey, but I will now advert only to one case, and the boy had been blessed. On his re- which last year made a deep impression on turn, the blue sky unveiled her loveliness; the assembly and on all Protestant Dis: gladdening was the splendour of the sum senters. It was a refusal to celebrate the mer sun; the noble were not absent; marriage ceremony between David Davids there were a thousand flowers and shrubs, and Mary Jenkins at the parish of Llangain fair, blooming, and fragrant, as the mul- in Wales. There the clergyman, instead titude that now surround me; but as he of being the father in the family of his gazed, he paused and trembled-he knew parishioners, sympathising in their sornot the scene. The spoiler had been rows, and joying in their joys, and wil. there. - No longer flourished the beech- lingly uniting in holy matrimony, beings tree or the oak; the beech had been up- whom love had made one in heart, had rooted by tempest-the old oak was broken acted as the evil sprites who delight in and dishonoured in the dust. So I return. clouding pleasure and withering the plants Those whom we have been accustomed to of hope. Stern and persecuting, he had behold, who were our ornament and pride, refused to perform the service of the are seen no more! Here often had been church, unless the female would forego present Townsend, silvery, though ma- her faith, and would consent to be introjestic as the beech. He, whose words duced into what he called the Christian were eloquence and grace ! he had been Church, by the baptismal right to be aduprooted! Here too appeared our ve. ministered by him. In her, principle nerable. Bogue !-he who ever stood un triumpbed over desire"; and the virtue of bending as the oak! whose roots stuck a Christian over the beatings of a maiden deeper, and whose branches were ex heart; amid a multitude of friends who tended, as, the storm assailed! On this had come to bring their greetings and spot he stood before us ;-still I seem to their presents, she refused to sacrifice her view him with his noble high-arched brow, conscience to the harsh demand; her his hoary locks, and manly form, pouring friends retired, sad and disappointed, yet forth his intellectual treasures, and glorying in her firmness to her faith. The breathing the aspirations of a heart de. mother to whom a daughter's wedding-day voted to liberty and truth. He too is brings such pleasant recollections and such broken, and in the dust, though not dis- bliss, was first to smile amid her tears, honoured. Well then may I feel op- and to approve the vestal spirit that des prest!--We do not sufficiently estimate clined compliance with a requisition that the living, and too soon forget the dead. the law did not allow and humanity conGreat were the Christian virtues of the demned. I will not detail the circumphilanthropic Townsend, and long shall stances, but only remind you that the his memory be dear! And never by us. hoary father of the young woman, with the shall Bogue be unrevered lahe appeared independence which honours the mounto form the link connecting the present taineer and ancient Briton, ventured to generation with our revered forefathers- express, in no measured tones, his disapthe Puritans and Nonconformists, whose pointment and disgust. For that conduct history he wrote. Immortal men! to the clergyman prosecuted him in the whom the Reformation owed its esta- Bishop's Court at Carmarthen, for brawblishment, and even their proud con- ling on the occasion. The Committee temners owe the palaces in which they pledged themselves to have this clergyman dwell, and all the best blessings of our taught his duty by law, and that the shield land! How do I now wish that on my of this Society should be spread over the memory, as on my heart, was inscribed peasant's head. The whole year has passed every word he uttered, and every senti. without a decision in either of these cases. ment he taught; and that I could tell to And what can better prove the need of others how he proved the inseparable such an institution, than the present case. connection between civil and religious The clergyman violates the law. To intiliberty! and how he told us that there midate the persons he has wronged, he could neither be true piety nor national institutes proceedings against them in a greatness where freedom was, unknown! local ecclesiastical court, haring a clergyBut though opprest, we dare not to man for its judge. The result of such despair : rather, like the wildest tribes proceedings, before such a tribunal, instituted for such an object, and by such a from Purton, in Wiltshire, applications complainant, who can doubt? The So- have been made as to the rating of chapels, ciety have therefore removed the suit into and advice and relief have been bestowed. the Arches Court of Canterbury, in this The Rev. Mr. Chappel, of Yaxley, in metropolis, where an enlightened judge Huntingdonshire, wrote to the Society to will preside, and justice will result. But state, that a chapel lately erected at Stilton for the Society, however this poor man, had been rated to the poor's, rate. His who though strong in right, is weak in application for assistance and advice arfortune, would not only have no redress, rived too late, as a session had intervened, but would be humbled or undone by the and the law forbade them to appeal. In very wrongdoer of whose wrong doing he all such cases, I repeat, that no redress complains. In such cases the importance can be obtained against assessments illegal of the Society seems most manifest; it in nature or excessive in amount, but by opposes a mound to the torrent of oppres- appeal; and the appeal must be made to sion ; it stoops to sustain the feeble in a the next Quarter Session after the allowrighteous cause; while it bends not to the ance of a rate ; for if a Session be allowed lofty, it assures the humble of defence, to intervene, no objections, however just and forbids presumption to the proud. or numerous, avail, and redress against Happy am I to state that the law's delay, such rate cannot be obtained. and the oppressor's wrong have not, how At North Crawley, in Buckinghamshire, ever, prevented the union of these peasant a notice of appeal has been giren against lovers, and I doubt not but they remem a rate by some individual, and the nonber the Society in their morning orisons assessment of the dissenting meeting-house · and evening prayer,

was among the objections he alleged. The On the subject of the exemption of Rev. Mr. Bull, of Newport Pagnell, well Dissenters from Sunday tolls, some appli known, and well respected wherever he is cations have been received. At Harniston, known, wrote upon the subject; notice near Lincoln, a toll was demanded at Lin- was given that we would protect the concolo bar, from the wife of Mr. Thorold, a gregation. That very notice was sufficient; Wesleyan Methodist, as she passed alone we were soon apprized that such objection to the Methodist chapel, which was “ her would be waived, and “ nominis umbra," usual place of religious worship.” The by the very shadow of our name, we were advice of the Society was requested whe- relieved from all trouble and expense. ther slie was liable, or could not also claim At Chertsey, in Surrey, also, rates were the same exemption which to her husband demanded, but the interposition of the would not have been denied. In that case Society procured the abandonment of the the Committee displayed true Christian demand, and we were encouraged by sucgallantry. They regard their female friends cess. On this subject I renew my statewith true respect, and were gladly up- ments, that unless a profit forming a beneholders of their rights, and they desire that ficial occupation arises to the minister or they should also worship God as their trustees, after the payment of all requisite consciences approve, and that no obstruc- expense, from any place of religious wortions should oppose their inclinations but ship, no charge for poor's rates can legally such as reason, religion, and pure affec- be made, and if made, cannot be sus. tions may create. They replied with plea- tained. In all such cases, where chapels sure, that the same exemption which the have been improperly assessed to the rates, husband might have claimed in passing to the parties should watch thie making of the his place of worship, his wife also in pass- rate, should attend the vestry, and object, ing to the place which she preferred, might and if that effort should not avail, but the equally enjoy. From Mr. Leonard, of rate be made, then they should demand a Bristol, and the Rev. Mr. Roberts, of copy of the entry, being the assessment of Holywell, in Flintshire, letters have also the chapel, give regular notice of appeal to been received. In the former case, no the very next Sessions; that notice must relief could be awarded, but in the latter announce all grounds of objection to the case, I believe the letters addressed by this rate ; and when the Session arrives, unless Society will ensure redress. The introduc- great prejudice be entertained, and church tion of the decisive clause of exemption influence prevail, the assessment will be into the General Turnpike Act, whereby disallowed, and a good triumph may be the rights of Dissenters have been pro won. tected, and which after many efforts this On the subject of rates for building Society obtained, has insured for Dissen. new churches, several applications have ters a liberation from a burthen which been made; nor do they excite surprise. many individuals greatly felt, and which As Dissenters, we do not complain that extorted from many country congregations we have to erect and to repair the edifices, a very large amount.

whether perfect or humble, which we dediOn the question of Poor Rates, I also "cate to religious adoration. We do not find less disposition to trouble and oppress. complain that we have to support the

the ruins of some Grecian temple, that and noblest spirits, we will often visit the native valley was present to his mind. tombs of the departed, and there renew Amid her sylvan charms, painted by ima. our vow never to desert the cause gination, with a vivid pencil, two vene- they cherished, but transmit to future rable trees, beneath which he had re- ages the sacred flame of freedom unclined conversed, and thought, were ever extinguished and unlessened, beaming prominent and dear. Half way up the more widely and more bright! hill there grew the majestic and wide. On these occasions I have been accusspreading beach; and in the centre of the tomed to refer to cases mentioned at a green stood the giant oak, under whose previous meeting, but then undecided : antique arms the aged had grown grey, but I will now advert only to one case, and the boy had been blessed. On his re- which last year made a deep impression on turn, the blue sky unveiled her loveliness; the assembly and on all Protestant Dis. gladdening was the splendoar of the sum senters. It was a refusal to celebrate the mer sun; the noble were not absent; marriage ceremony between David Davids there were a thousand flowers and shrubs, and Mary Jenkins at the parish of Llangain fair, blooming, and fragrant, as the mul- in Wales. There the clergyman, instead titude that now surround me; but as he of being the father in the family of his gazed, he paused and trembled-he knew parishioners, sympathising in their sornot the scene. The spoiler had been rows, and joying in their joys, and wil. there. No longer flourished the beech- lingly uniting in holy matrimony, beings tree or the oak; the beech had been up- whom love had made one in heart, had rooted by tempest-the old oak was broken acted as the evil sprites who delight in and dishonoured in the dust. So I return clouding pleasure and withering the plants Those whom we have been accustomed to of hope. Stern and persecuting, he had behold, who were our ornament and pride, refused to perform the service of the are seen no more! Here often had been church, unless the female would forego present Townsend, silvery, though ma- ber faith, and would consent to be introjestic as the beech. He, whose words* duced into what he called the Christian were eloquence and grace ! he had been Church, by the baptismal right to be aduprooted! Here too appeared our ve ministered by him. In her, principle nerable. Bogue !- he who ever stood un- triumpbed over desire'; and the virtue of bending as the oak! whose roots stuck a Christian over the beatings of a maiden deeper, and whose branches were ex heart; amid a multitude of friends who tended, as, the storm assailed! On this had come to bring their greetings and spot he stood before us ;-still I seem to their presents, she refused to sacrifice her view him with his noble high-arched brow, conscience to the harsh demand; her his hoary locks, and manly form, pouring friends retired, sad and disappointed, yet forth his intellectual treasures, and glorying in her firmness to her faith. The breathing the aspirations of a heart de mother to whom a daughter's wedding-day voted to liberty and truth. He too is brings such pleasant recollections and such broken, and in the dust, though not dis. bliss, was first to smile amid her tears, honoured. Well then may I feel op- and to approve the vestal spirit that deprest!--We do not sufficiently estimate clined compliance with a requisition that the living, and too soon forget the dead. the law did not allow and humanity conGreat were the Christian virtues of the demned. I will not detail the circumphilanthropic Townsend, and long shall stances, but only remind you that the his memory be dear! And never by us. hoary father of the young woman, with the shall Bogue be unrevered !-he appeared independence which honours the mounto form the link connecting the present taineer and ancient Briton, ventured to generation with our revered forefathers- express, in no measured tones, his disapthe Puritans and Nonconformists, whose pointment and disgust. For that conduct history he wrote. Immortal men! to the clergyman prosecuted him in the whom the Reformation owed its esta. Bishop's Court at Carmarthen, for brawblishment, and even their proud con- ling on the occasion. The Committee temners owe the palaces in which they pledged themselves to have this clergyman dwell, and all the best blessings of our taught his duty by law, and that the shield land! How do I now wish that on my of this Society should be spread over the memory, as on my heart, was inscribed peasant's head. The whole year has passed every word le uttered, and every senti. without a decision in either of these cases. ment he taught; and that I could tell to And what can better prove the need of others how he proved the inseparable such an institution, than the present case. connection between civil and religious The clergyman violates the law. To intiliberty! and how he told us that there midate the persons he has wronged, be could neither be true piety nor national institutes proceedings against them in a greatness where freedom was unknown ! local ecclesiastical court, having a clergyBut though opprest, we dare not to man for its judge. The result of such despair : rather, like the wildest tribes proceedings, before such a tribunal, insti

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