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MEMOIR OF THE REV. DAVID BOGUE, D.D. LATE TUTOR OF THE HAMPSHIRE AND MISSIONARY ACADEMY, AND PASTOR OF THE

INDEPENDENT CHURCH, GOSPORT.

(Continued from page 5.)

nnnnnnnn AMONGST other calumnies which plication to study, especially in were circulated against the found- foreign theology and biblical criers of the Missionary Society, was ticism, was continually enlarging the ungenerous imputation, that his capacity for usefulness at home, they were ready to transport their and this literary diligence could brethren to ungenial climates, to not be concealed. On the death labour amongst savage and hea- of Mr. Welsh, the patron of Gosthen nations, while they continued port Academy, it was found that to enjoy the delights of home. This he had made no provision for its reproach was as untrue as it was · continuance by bequest, and thereunkind, for Dr. Bogue, joined · fore that useful institution would with his friends, the Rev. Greville hàve ceased, but for the reputaEwing, and the Rev. William · tion of its tutor, which commandInnes, about the year - 1796, in ed the liberal support of several several memorials and petitions to : friends till 1800, when Robert the Directors of the East India . Haldane, Esq. of Edinburgh, a Company, requesting permission : gentleman of distinguished intellithat they and their families might' gence and Christian philanthrogo to Bengal, and devote their i py, proposed to subscribe £100 future years to the propagation of annually, one fourth of the exthe Gospel in our Hindoo empire. : pense, towards the support of ten These repeated requests were most additional students, if the churches peremptorily refused, though made in Hampshire would supply the in language of earnest expostu-: remaining sum requisite for their lation and Christian eloquence: education and support. This was one of these memorials was accepted, and the County Assoprinted in their joint names, and ciation of Hampshire has concirculated amongst leading and tinued to patronize the institution influential persons; and though no to the present time. immediate effect resulted from it, Amongst other schemes of useyet it abides a monument of the fulness, which arose out of the repersonal devotion of its authors to ligious excitement produced by the missionary work, and doubt- the establishment of the Missionless contributed to diffuse opinions, ary Society, was the admirable which have since so happily chang- plan of a Religious Tract Society, ed the policy of the Honourable is to print and distribute small Court." Though shut out from pieces on subjects purely reliforeign labours, his assiduous ap- gious." This valuable institution

New Series, No. 14..

was founded in May, 1799, and labours they have before acknowthe subject of this memoir took a ledged and recorded, and whose prominent part in describing its disposition to promote the designs character, and asserting its claims. of the Society, and his devotedness He penned the first Tract in the to the cause of God, were again Series, An Address to Christians, manifested by his consenting to recommending the distribution of accept the office of Tutor to the cheap Religious Tracts, in which Missionary Society.” He therefore he proclaims, that " Pure added to his other lectures a TRUTH” is to be the exclusive course suited to form ministers for subject of its publications; and foreign missions, and three stuadds, “nor should any worldly dents were, for this purpose, imscheme be interwoven with the mediately placed under his care. truth, nor attempted to be con- The public mind had been powercealed under its folds. Here fully excited by the entire abolishould not be seen the slightest tion of papal authority in France, vestige of any carnal end, in any and the Directors of the Missionary form, or for any purpose, however Society felt, in common with all laudable some may think it ; pious minds, that if the fabric of nothing but divinetruth, unmingled, superstition had been demolished unadulterated, and pure, as it came in that country by the hand of infrom heaven, fit for the whole fidelity, it could never be the dehuman race to imbibe.” Such wise sign of Divine Providence, that principles naturally commended infidelity should acquire a permatheir author to the managers of nent influence over the popular - this Catholic Society, and they re- mind; and they were, therefore, quested him to advocate its cause called to deliberate what was their from the pulpit of Dr. Hunter, duty, as Christians, towards their where he preached an able ser- unhappy neighbours. The state of mon, in May, 1800, from Psalm political hostility which subsisted xliii. 30, and which discourse he between the two countries, preafterwards gave to the public, vented, at that time, all personal entitled, The Diffusion of Divine intercourse; it was therefore sug

Truth;" in which he re-asserts those gested, we believe, by Dr. Bogue · principles which cannot be too himself, that it was most important much enforced on the attention of to circulate, in France and Belgium, the religious public at the present a large edition of the French New moment.

Testament, with a suitable prelimi. About the same time, the Mis- nary dissertation on the evidences sionary Society's Directors wise- of its divine inspiration. This proly resolved to place their fu- posal was deemed important, and ture Missionaries under a course its projector was naturally requestof preparatory studies, and in de- ed to prepare the intended introliberating on the best means of duction. This led to the publicaestablishing the proposed semi- tion of his " Essay on the Authority nary, they observe, in their report of the New Testament ;" a work for 1801, - the superintendence of which condenses a great mass of a person of eminent abilities, of evidence into a small volume, and exemplary piety, and of a true places it in a most perspicuous and missionary spirit, seemed to be an convincing light, and which claims acquisition, first in order and im- the attentive perusal of every inportance in this business. With telligent Christian.. these views, they were directed to The providence of God having. their reverend brother, Dr. Bogue, however, by the cessation of a whose laudable zeal and efficient destructive war between this coun

try and France, in October, 1801, title of “ Report of a Deputation unexpectedly opened that country from the Hibernian Society, respectto the agents of the Missionary ing the Religious State of Ireland,Society, it was resolved to send a and produced an impression upon deputation to Paris and the de- the public mind, powerful enough to partments, to promote the intended place that Society amongst the most publication. Dr. Bogue had tra- effective for the reformation of the velled, when young, in France and popish inhabitants of that country. the Netherlands, and having ac- Napoleon Buonaparte having quired a command of the French succeeded in dragging “ his most language, was too well qualified and Holy Lord, Pope Pius the VII.” too deeply interested, to be over- to Paris, to figure in the pageant looked; he therefore was appointed, of his self-performed coronation, with other gentlemen, to this diffi- he rewarded his holiness and the cult mission. They, however, suc- popish clergy, by authorising “ a ceeded beyond their best hopes; a Catechism for the use of all the respectable member of the Legisla. Churches in the French empire ; tive Assembly engaged to trans.. which contained a revival, in the late the Essay into French; and an 19th century, of the absurdities Italian bishop, disgusted with the which the Romish Church had absurdities of Papacy, was willing taught in the darkest ages. This to engage with his Protestant fel. was a document to Dr. Bogue of low Christians, by translating it melancholy interest. He saw in into his own language. Many it a cloud which was again to darother plans of extensive promise ken a sky, which he trusted the rewere suggested by the deputation volutionary storm had cleared for on its return, but the short dura- for ever, yet he did not tion of peace closed again those

- bate a jot fields of usefulness which had been

Of heart or hopeopened before them.

but obtained its translation, and The neglected and deplorable gave it to the British public, with state of our sister country, Ireland, an introduction and notes, which justly attracted the attention of display his abhorrence of popery, English Protestants at the close of and his confident expectation of its the year 1806, and led to the for- final overthrow. The following mation of the Hibernian Society, passage is selected from the former, for the diffusion of religious know- as it presents us with the grounds ledge in Ireland. The committee to hope, that even the increased were intreated, by their Irish cor- zeal of the Bourbon priests will not respondents, to send to that coun- be able to destroy what was obtry a deputation to obtain the re- tained for the cause of religious quired information on the spot; liberty at so fearful a cost. and in the summer of 1807, Dr. " That popery will, by the ineans now Bogue was associated with the Rev. Messrs. Charles and Hughes,

its former strength, is extremely question

able. A certain man of old spat in an idol's and S. Mills, Esq. in visiting it. face. The man was put to death ; but the The tour occupied the party about idol was worshipped no more. For near a month, and it designedly lay twelve years, every idol in France was spit through some of the most miserable

upon by the multitude; how difficult must

it be to bring them to worship these again? • and unfrequented districts. In the Besides, the disuse of the Romish worship

cities, they obtained that class of by the rising generation, has left their information, which the cabins of minds empty of any veneration for popery wild Connaught could not furnish,

rnish and its rites. In such a case, especially at

this period of the world's age, the difficulty and the result of the whole was of bringing the heart to feel the respect presented to the public under the required, must be immense. A poor man

had his house burnt to the ground; but pervades the greater part of its devotional what grieved him most was, that the image services, and the very extensive learning which he had worshipped from his infancy, of a large body of its clergy, entitle it to was consumed in the fire. His neighbour, the respect of all who dissent from it, and a carpenter, endeavoured to console him, especially of those who place themselves, and promised to make him a handsome with regard to it, in the situation of disnew one from a pear-tree in the garden, putants. The Doctor, himself, was so which had escaped the flames. It was impressed with a sense of the propriety done, and it far exceeded in beauty the old of these sentiments, that he assured me, black smoky idol which had been made some time since, that in another edition, from his grand-father's pear-tree. But which was then in contemplation, the with all his efforts, the man never could style and manner in this part of the work feel the veneration for it which he had felt would be altered, and that I might menfor the other. In France, at this time, tion it to as many as I might think prothere are hundreds of Virgin Marys, saints, per. I think it, therefore, due to his and angels, with new hands, new feet, new memory, and to myself, in commending legs, new arms, new noses, new ears, and the general sentiments of the work, to new heads, for the old were broken off by mention this fact now. But with these revolutionary zeal; and there are, likewise, remarks, I cannot refrain from expressiog new Virgin Marys, &c. without number. an opinion, that there are more important Is it not then likely, that the young people general principles connected with the welat least, will view them in the same light fare of the state, the prosperity of the that the bereaved man did his new pear. kingdom of Christ, and the good of the tree image ?"

world, in those four volumes, than are to In 1808, appeared the first vo

be found in any work of a similar extent.” lume of an extensive work, The

Dr. Bogue accompanied his History of Dissenters, from the friend and fellow-labourer, Dr. Revolution in 1688 to the vear Bennett, in the summer of 1816, 1808, executed jointly by Dr. in a journey through the kingdom Bogue, and his friend and early of the Netherlands, in the service pupil Dr. Bennett, which was fol of the Missionary Society; and lowed, in the course of the four his presence every where inspired succeeding years, by three other that veneration and esteem which volumes, which completed the de- his character justly claimed. sign. We shall avail ourselves A valuable and characteristic of the very intelligent remarks of volume of Discourses on the MilMr. Griffin on this publication; lenium was given to the public, by some parts of which certainly ex- Dr. Bogue, in the close of 1818. cited strong feelings of resentment

They were first delivered, at vaamongst attached Churchmen, and rious intervals, to his own people, of regret amongst candid Dissent- as one of those many valuable ers:

courses of sermons with which " It is a work of great importance to

they were favoured, and which the Christian church, and will be read

must have been especially interestand referred to with increasing interest, ing to those candidates for mis-- as the light of truth increasingly beams sionary labours who were privion the nation, and its cause is advanced

aced

leved to hear them

leged to hear them. in the world. I say nothing in defence of the essay prefixed, which has given « This work,” says Mr. Griffin, “ shows considerable pain to most of his friends, the great power of his mind in producing as being in a style unsuited to the dignity effect. It is a work considerably in adof the subject, and the respect which is vánce even of this enlightened age. It due to the national church. We have an paints such a paradise upon earth as the undoubted right to differ from it, but no faith of some is unable to contemplate or right to treat it with disrespect. Persons their hope to realize ; but it is a copy in their opinions may have just cause for from the word of God, and one day the dissenting from the establishment on ac glorious reality shall be exhibited to the count of its union with the state, the na world of men and angels, as evidence of ture of its discipline, and its remaining in the love, the faithfulness, and the power tolerance, in still making a religious test of the great Head of the Church. The as essential to the service of the state ; work contains no curious conjectures of yet the evangelical character of its creed miraculous events necessary to produce and articles, the excellent spirit which the millenial state, no representations of

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