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nor prize the fleeting goods and vain,

the flowers that bloom but to decay!
Nor wealth, nor joy, nor aught but pain,

was e'er to mortal's lot secure:
our first best lesson—to endure!

A. LODGE from Schiller

1208 ODE ON OCCASION OF THE GREAT EXHIBITION,

1862
THE world-compelling plan was thine,
T and, lo! the long laborious miles
of Palace; lo! the giant aisles,
rich in model and design:
harvest-tool and husbandry,
loom and wheel and engin'ry,
secrets of the sullen mine,
steel and gold, and corn and wine,
fabric rough, or Fairy fine,
sunny tokens of the Line,
Polar marvels, and a feast
of wonder, out of West and East,
and shapes and hues of art Divine !
all of beauty, all of use,
that one fair planet can produce,

brought from under every star,
blown from over every main,
and mixt, as life is mixt with pain,

the works of peace with works of war,
And is the goal so far away?
far, how far, no man can say:
let us have our dream to-day.

A. TENNYSON 1209

THE ELEMENTS
AN is permitted much
M to scan and learn

in Nature's frame;
till he well-nigh can tame
brute mischiefs, and can touch
invisible things, and turn
all warring ills to purposes of good.

Thus as a God below,
he can control,

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Passages for Translation into Greek Anapæsts
and harmonize what seems amiss to flow

as severed from the whole
and dimly understood.
But o'er the elements

one Hand alone,

one Hand has sway.
What influence day by day
in straiter belts prevents

the impious ocean, thrown
alternate o'er the ever-sounding shore? .

Or who has eye to trace

how the plague came?
forerun the doublings of the Tempest's race?

or the Air's weight and flame
on a set scale explore?

Lyra Apostolica

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1210T LOOK to the west, when I gae to rest,

I that happy my dreams and my slumbers may be:
for far in the west is he I lo'e best,
the lad that is dear to my baby and me.

R. BURNS

I2II

KING ARTHUR
DUT now farewell. I am going a long way

D with those thou seëst--if indeed I go-
for all my mind is clouded with a doubt,-
to the island-valley of Avilion;
where falls not hail or rain or any snow,
nor ever wind blows loudly; but it lies
deep-meadowed, happy, fair with orchard-lawns
and bowery hollows crowned with summer sea,

where I will heal me of my grievous wound.' 1212 So said he, and the barge with oar and sail

moved from the brink, like some full-breasted swan
that, fluting a wild carol ere her death,
ruffles her pure cold plume and takes the flood
with swarthy webs. Long stood Sir Bedivere
revolving many memories, till the hull
look'd one black dot against the verge of dawn,
and on the mere the wailing died away.

A. TENNYSON

1213

MARS AND VENUS CO, in the painter's animated frame, w where Mars embraces the soft Paphian dame,

the little loves in sport the faulchion wield,
or join their strength to heave his pondrous shield;
one strokes the plume in Tityon's gore embrued,
and one the spear that reeks in Typhon's blood;
another's infant brows the helm sustain,
he nods his crest and frights the shrieking train.

J. TICKELL 1214

THE STORM
AS when the air is serene in the sultry solstice of

summer,
suddenly gathers a storm, and the deadly sling of the

hailstones beats down the farmer's corn in the field and shatters

his windows, hiding the sun, and strewing the ground with thatch

from the house-roofs, bellowing flee the herds, and seek to break their en

closures : so on the hearts of the people descended the words

of the speaker. Silent a moment they stood in speechless wonder and

then rose louder and ever louder a wail of sorrow and anger, and by one impulse moved they madly rushed to the doorway.

H. W. LONGFELLOW

1215

THE EAGLE
THEN, as an eagle, who with pious care

I was beating wildly on the wing for prey,
to her now silent eyrie does repair,

and finds her callow infants forced away: stung with her love, she stoops upon the plain,

the broken air loud whistling as she flies : she stops to listen,-and shoots forth again, and guides her pinions by her young one's cries.

J. DRYDEN 1216

PHÆDRIA'S GONDELAY CFTSOONES her shallow ship away did slide,

L more swift then swallow sheres the liquid skye withouten oare or pilot it to guide, or winged canvas with the wind to fly:

onely she turnd a pin, and by and by
it cut away upon the yielding wave,
(ne cared she her course for to apply)
for it was taught the way which she would have,
and both from rocks and flats itselfe could wisely save:

E. SPENSER 1217

DELOS
AS th' isle of Delos whylome, men report,
O amid th' Ægæan sea long time did stray,
ne made for shipping any certeine port,
till that Latona traveiling that way,
flying from Iunoes wrath and hard assay,
of her fayre twins was there delivered,
which afterwards did rule the night and day;
thenceforth it firmely was established,
and for Apolloes temple highly herried.

E. SPENSER 1218

THE SHIP AS a tall ship tossed in troublous seas, H whom raging windes threatning to make the pray of the rough rockes, do diversly disease, meetes two contrarie billows by the way, that her on either side doe sore assay, and boast to swallow her in greedy grave; shee, scorning both their spights, does make wide way, and, with her brest breaking the fomy wave, does ride on both their backs and faire herself doth save.

E. SPENSER 1219

SIMILE AS fearfull fowle, that long in secret cave A for dread of soring hauke herself hath hid, not caring how, her silly life to save, she her gay painted plumes disorderid; seeing at last herselfe from daunger rid, peeps forth, and soone renews her native pride; she gins her feathers fowle disfigured: prowdly to prune, and sett on every side ; she shakes off shame, ne thinks how erst she did her hide.

E. SPENSER

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