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and they drew a thousand bows. A thousand arrows flew; the sons of Usnoth fell. They fell like three young oaks which stood alone on the hill; the traveller saw the lovely trees, and wondered how they grew so lonely: the blast of the desert came, by night, and laid their green heads low; next day he returned, but they were withered, and the heath was bare.

Dar-thula stood in silent grief, and beheld their fall; no tear is in her eye: but her look is wildly sad. Pale was her cheek; her trembling lips broke short an half-formed word. Her dark hair flew on the wind. But gloomy Cairbar came. “Where is thy lover now; the car-borne chief of Etha? Hast thou beheld the halls of Usnoth; or the darkbrown hills of Fingal ? My battle had roared on Morven, did not the winds meet Dar-thula. Fingal himself would have been low, and sorrow dwelling in Selma.' Her shield fell from Dar-thula's arm, her breast of snow appeared. It appeared, but it was stained with blood, for an arrow was fixed in her side. She fell on the fallen Nathos, like a wreath of snow. Her dark hair spreads on his face, and their blood is mixing round.

1313 Daughter of Colla, thou art low!' said Cairbar's hundred bards; "silence is at the blue streams of Selama, for Truthil's race have failed. When wilt thou rise in thy beauty, first of Erin's maids? Thy sleep is long in the tomb, and the morning distant far. The sun shall not come to thy bed, and say, 'Awake Dar-thula! awake, thou first of women! the wind of spring is abroad. The flowers shake their heads on the green hills, the woods wave their growing leaves. Retire, O sun, the daughter of Colla is asleep. She will not come forth in her beauty: she will not move, in the steps of her loveliness.

Such was the song of the bards, when they raised the tomb. I sung, afterwards, over the grave, when the king of Morven came; when he came to green Ullin to fight with car-borne Cairbar.

J. MACPHERSON

1314

THAMMUZ
THAMMUZ came next behind,

1 whose annual wound in Lebanon allured
the Syrian damsels to lament his fate
in amorous ditties all a summer's day;

while smooth Adonis from his native rock
ran purple to the sea, supposed with blood
of Thammuz yearly wounded. The love tale
infected Sion's daughters with like heat,
whose wanton passions in the sacred porch
Ezekiel saw, when, by the vision led,
his eye surveyed the dark idolatries
of alienated Judah.

J. MILTON

1315 SATAN'S SPEECH TO BEELZEBUB

W HAT though the field be lost,

W all is not lost; the unconquerable will, and study of revenge, immortal hate, and courage never to submit or yield, and what is else not to be overcome; that glory never shall his wrath or might extort from me. To bow and sue for grace with suppliant knee, and deify his power, who from the terror of this arm so late doubted his empire,—that were low indeed, that were an ignominy and shame beneath this downfall. Since by fate the strength of Gods and this empyreal substance cannot fail ; since through experience of this great event in arms not worse, in foresight much advanced, we may with more successful hope resolve to wage by force or guile eternal war, irreconcileable to our grand foe, who now triumphs, and in the excess of joy sole reigning holds the tyranny of Heaven.

J. MILTON

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1316

MONEY GETS THE MASTERIE

MONEY GETS THE MASTERIE 'IGHT thou with shafts of silver and oercome,

when no force else can get the masterdome.

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1317

REWARDS
STILL to our gains our chief respect is had,
w reward it is that makes us good or bad.

1318

NOTHING NEW
N OTHING is new: we walk where others went:
IV there's no vice now, but has his president.

1319

UPON A PAINTED GENTLEWOMAN EN say y' are faire: and faire ye are, 'tis true, but, hark! we praise the painter now, not you.

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GREAT SPIRITS SUPERVIVE UR mortall parts may wrapt in seare-cloths lye; great spirits never with their bodies dye.

1321

POVERTY AND RICHES
CIVE want her welcome if she comes; we find
U riches to be but burthens to the mind.

Passages for Translation into Greek Elegiacs. 541 1322

ADVERSITY
TOVE is maintained by wealth ; when all is spent,
L adversity then breeds the discontent.

1323

POVERTY THE GREATEST PACK
TO mortall men great loads allotted be,
I but of all packs no pack like poverty.

1324

MONEY MAKES THE MIRTHE
THEN all birds els do of their musick faile,
money's the still-sweet-singing nightingale.

R. HERRICK 1325

THE PERMANENT TIME flies ever and none can arrest him.-He I seeks the enduring, be but true,-to thy side thus thou wilt bind him in chains.

J. C. HARE from Schiller 1326

TENN dir in Zornesgluth dein sterblich Herz

will wallen, sag ihm: Weisst du, wie bald du wirst in Staub

zerfallen? 1327

EN Wanderer freut die Nacht, nur wenn er ist I am Ziel, auf halbem Wege nicht, wenn sie ihn überfiel.

1328

BITTum Leben noch! Du fühlst mit deinen

O

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das du rasch wandeln kannst nicht unter Gottes

Engeln. 1329 D IE meisten fürchten sich darum vorm Tod

vielleicht, weil sie des Lebens Ziel noch haben nicht erreicht.

F. RUCKERT

1330

EPIGRAM THAT thou may'st injure no man, dove-like be, 1 and serpent-like, that none may injure thee.

W. COWPER 1331

DETRACTION
T IE on, whilst my revenge shall be
L to speak the very truth of thee.

EARL NUGENT

1332 EPITAPH IN RUGBY CHURCH-YARD

INNOCENS et perbeatus

1 more floris decidi:
quid, viator, fles sepultum?
flente sum felicior.

1333

EPITAPH UPON AN INFANT
DENEATH a sleeping infant lies-

D to earth her body's lent;
more glorious she'll hereafter rise,

but not more innocent:
so when the Archangel's trump shall blow

and souls to bodies join,
millions may wish, their stay below
had been as short as thine.

S. WESLEY

1334 ON THE DEATH OF A YOUNG LADY NAMED ROSE

LLE était de ce monde, ou les plus belles choses

ont le pire destin;
et rose elle a vécu, ce qui vivent les roses,
l'espace d'un matin.

F. DE MALHERBE

1335

EPIGRAM
DOVERO giovin fui, ricco in vecchiezza,

misero in ogni eta piu d'altro assai; .
mentre usar la potei, non l'ebbi mai,
or, ch'usar non la posso, ho gran ricchiezza.

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