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silberen holdes Gebit for Translati

deren holdes Gebild still aus der Ferne mir winkt; silbergrau bezeichnet dir früh der Schnee nun die

Gipfel, der sich in stürmender Nacht dir um den Scheitel

ergoss. Jugend ach! ist dem Alter so nah, durch's Leben ver

bunden, wie ein beweglicher Traum Gestern und Heute verband.

J. W. VON GOETHE

1362

UPON A CHILD THAT DYED
ERE she lies, a pretty bud,
11 lately made of flesh and blood,
who as soone fell fast asleep,
as her little eyes did peep.
Give her strewings; but not stir
the earth, that lightly covers her.

R. HERRICK 1363

UPON CUPID
AS lately I a garland bound

’mongst roses, I there Cupid found;
I took him, put him in my cup,
and, drunk with wine, I drank him up.
Hence then it is, that my poore brest
co'd never since find any rest.

R. HERRICK

1364 ALL THINGS DECAY AND DIE

ALL things decay with time: the forrest sees A the growth and downfall of her aged trees: that timber tall, which threescore lusters stood the proud dictator of the state-like wood; I mean the soveraigne of all plants, the oke droops, dies, and falls without the cleavers stroke.

R. HERRICK 1365

W HEN the rack of the winter is rolled away,

WV and summer comes in with her garland of May, I cried, “Lovely season, how pleased shall I see the friend of my bosom returning with thee!'

With thee she returns not-Oh, how shall I bear
the breath of thy fragrance that whispers despair;
with thee she returns not—her death-bed has tolled,
and every fond hope in my bosom is cold!

W. L. BOWLES

1366

INSCRIPTION ON AN ÆOLIAN HARP
AIL, heavenly harp, where Memnon's skill is

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that charm'st the ear with music all thine own,
which tho' untouched can'st rapturous strains impart !
O rich of genuine nature, free from art!
such the wild warblings of the sylvan throng,
so simply sweet the untaught virgin's song.

C. SMART 1367

AM FLUSSE
VERFLIESSET viel geliebte Lieder

zum Meere der Vergessenheit?
kein Knabe sing' entzückt euch wieder,
kein Mädchen in der Blüthenzeit.
Ihr singet nur von meiner Lieben ;
nun spricht sie meiner Treue Hohn:
ihr wart ins Wasser eingeschrieben;
so fliesst denn auch mit ihm davon.

J. F. G. SCHILLER
THE DEW-DROP
A PEARLY dewdrop see some flower adorn,
H and grace with tender beam the rising morn;
but soon the sun permits a fiercer ray,
and the fair fabric rushes to decay:
lo, in the dust the beauteous ruin lies;
and the pure vapour seeks its native skies.
A fate like this to thee, sweet boy, was given:
to sparkle, bloom, and be exhaled to heaven.

LORD BYRON

1368

1369

ON ROBERT EMMETT
BREATHE not his name, let it sleep in the

shade,
where cold and unhonoured his relics are laid ;

sad, silent and dark be the tears that we shed,
as the night-dew that falls on the grass o'er his head.
But the night-dew that falls, though in silence it weeps,
shall brighten with verdure the grave where he sleeps;
and the tear that we shed, though in secret it rolls,
shall long keep his memory green in our souls.

T. MOORE 1370

THE MOUSE AND THE MISER TO a Mouse says a miser, “My dear Mr Mouse, 1 pray what may you please for to want in my

house? says the mouse, “Mr Miser, pray keep yourself quiet, you are safe in your person, your purse and your diet; a lodging I want, which even you may afford, but none would come here to beg, borrow or board.

C. SMART

THE ROCK OF RUBIES AND THE QUARRIE OF PEARLS

COME asked me where the rubies grew;
D and nothing I did say,
but with my finger pointed to

the lips of Julia.
Some asked how pearls did grow and where;

then spoke I to my girle
to part her lips, and shewed them there

the quarelets of pearl.

R. HERRICK

1372

CUPID AND THE ROSES
VENUS a garden had with roses decked,

V her joy; which none could see and not affect;
her son here plucking flowers his head t adorn,
prick'd his white finger with a piercing thorn;
blood from his hand, tears dropping from his eyes,
to his fair mother running, thus he cries;
"Who arm'd the rose with these blood-thirsty spears,
'gainst me he wars, and yet my colours bears.'

T. STANLEY 1373

A S slow our ship her foamy track
1 against the wind was cleaving,

her trembling pennant still looked back

to that dear Isle 'twas leaving. So loath we part from all we love,

from all the links that bind us; so turn our hearts as on we rove to those we've left behind us.

T, MOORE 1374

VERtue
W HAT one art thou, thus in torne weede yclad?

V Vertue, in price whom ancient sages had:
why poorely clad? for fading goods past care:
why double-faced? I marke each fortunes rare:
this bridle what? mindes rages to restraine:
why beare you tooles? I love to take great paine:
why wings? I teach above the starres to flie:
why treade you death? I onely cannot die.

T. WYATT 1375

ELEGY
W HAT can atone, o ever-injured shade,

V thy fate unpitied and thy rites unpaid?
No friend's complaint, no kind domestic tear
pleased thy pale ghost or graced thy mournful bier.
By foreign hands thy dying eyes were closed,
by foreign hands thy decent limbs composed,
by foreign hands thy humble grave adorned,
by strangers honoured, and by strangers mourned.

A. POPE BEAUTY T ET us use it whilst we may; L snatch those joys that haste away: earth her winter coat may cast and renew her beauty past; but, our winter come, in vain we solicit spring again; and when our furrows snow shall cover, love may return, but never lover.

R. FANSHAWE from Guarini 1377

HYLVS UI dormire paras, nocturna silentia noli y quaerere nec strepitum praetereuntis aquae:

1376

nec volucrum, nec quos edit lyra tinnula cantus,

quaeque soporiferum grana papaver habet;
nec. molli te crede toro nec membra fatiga,

nec dape nec sumpto lumina conde mero:
ut sopor obrepat non expugnabilis, audi,
dum coram populo rhetoricatur, Hylum.

A. JONSTON

1378 ADVERSITY THE TRUE TEST OF FRIENDSHIP

ALCUN non puo saper da chi sia amato,
n quando felice in su la rota siede;
pero c'ha i veri, e i finti amici a lato,
che mostran tutti la medesma fede.
Se poi si cangia in tristo il lieto stato,
volta la turba adulatrice in piede;
e quel che di cor ama, riman forte,
ed ama il suo signor dopo la morte.

L. ARIOSTO 1379

INCOGNITA NE TVRBENT
DARCE, homo, de rebus nimium trepidare caducis,

I nec te vestitûs cura cibique premat:
vive probus, coelique memor: nec scire labores,

quid ferat hora boni crastina, quidve mali:
ista Deo permitte; etenim, qui lilia vestit,

qui minimas vigili numine pascit aves, idem, crede, tibi praebebit rite rogatus,

quae tibi conveniet quamque mereris opem. 1380

COME, shepherds, follow me!
u run up apace the mountain !
see ! loe beside the fountain
Love laid to rest-how sweetly sleepeth he!

O take heed, come not nigh him!
but haste we hence and fly him:

and, lovers, dance with gladness-
for, while Love sleeps, is truce with care and sadness.

1381

SEGEN
NU bist wie eine Blume

so hold und schön und rein;

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