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gistic, antiphthisical, and palliative. Having sketched the kind of antiphlogistic treatment required in the inflammatory forms or complications of the disease, I have taken into consideration the remedies which can be called antiphthisical, including cod-liver oil, tonies, and antiseptics. The chapter on Palliative Treatment, and those on diet, regimen, and climate in Pulmonary Consumption, I have left to my son, whose experience at the Brompton Hospital, as well as taking charge of my patients in my absence, and whose familiarity with the best climates for invalids, well qualify him for the work.

It remains for me only to bespeak the indulgence of our readers on account of many shortcomings and defects in the execution of this work. It does not profess to be a complete treatise on its subject, nor to record all the labours and opinions of others. Its chief purpose is to communicate the experience and reasonings of a long life largely occupied in the study and treatment of Pulmonary Consumption.

49, Uppeb Bboob Stbeet, September Ut, 1871.

Strieker, and Lionel Beale—Amoeboid properties of Sarcophytes—
Effect of Heat—Sarcophytes the representatives of the Bioplasm—
Their Proliferation and Conversion into tissue-cells, pus, and tuber-
cle—Examination of other Phthinoplasms in the Lung—Crowded
andlndurated Sarcophytes—Fibrils and Hyaline—Acute and Chronic
results—Soft Consolidation and Caseation—Induration and Fibroid
Formation—Carnification—Cirrhosis, resulting from chronic inflam-
mation—Fibroid, identified with Cacoplastic and Contractile—
Proofs of its kinship with Tubercle—Different Clinical results of
Fibroid—Its Relations to Asthma and Dilated Bronchi—Favourable
and unfavourable issues of Consolidations—Although originating in
inflammation, being phthinoplastic, they may end in Phthisis—Both
inflammation and decay tn be counteracted . . . .39

CHAPTER V.

PATHOLOGY OF CONSUMPTION.

Independent of Inflammation—Sarcophytes in the Lymphaties; sub-

ject to the same changes, and producing the same results as those

from the blood-vessels—Scrofula of the Lymphatic Glands—Lympho-

mata—Caseation—Miliary tubercles, hardened Sarcophytes in the

adenoid tissue—Multiplied Lymphatic Sarcophytes, or Leucocytes,

produce Leukaemia . . . . . .40

CHAPTER VI.

PATHOLOGY OF CONSUMPTION.

Caseation and Fatty Degeneration of Tissues—Discovered by Gulliver

—Proved to be a chemical change, consequent on loss of vitality—

Fatty Degeneration the most gentle step to the death of Tissues—A

common process in Pathology—Causes softening and disintegration

of Tubercle, Fibrin, and Phthinoplasms generally . . .44

CHAPTER VII.

PATHOLOGY OF CONSUMPTION.

Nature of Pus and Suppuration—Pus-eells modified Sarcophytes;

partly liquefied by oxidation—Circumstances favouring it—Prolife-

ration and solvent action of Pus-cells—Result aplastic and destruc-

tive, but for conservative ends; in Abscess; in suppuration from

surfaces—Termination of Abscess in Caseation and Petrifaction—

Favourable issues of Suppuration— Subsequent effects in bronchial

glands—Gradations of lymph, pus, and tubercle . . .50

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CHAPTER VIII.

PATHOLOGY OF CONSUMPTION. TABULAR VIEW OF PHTHINOPLASMS,

OB ELEMENTS OF CONSUMPTIVE DISEASE AND THEIR RESULTS.

PAGK

Divided into those of the blood-vessels and those of the lymphatic

system—Synthetic view of clinical and pathological varieties of

Phthisis—Inflammatory Phthinoplasms—Fibroid; formed from fibril-

lating plasma with less corpuscular elements; tends to contract;

causing collapse of the chest, dilated bronchi, and other clinical

results, according to situation; scar-tissue and emphysema; may

endure long, and end favourably; or may end in caseation and

decay . . . . . . . .61

CHAPTER IX.

CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL VARIETIES OF CONSUMPTIVE

DISEASE.

Inflammatory Phthinoplasms, continued—Corpuscular, being altered

Sarcophytes—Pus and Suppuration, from oxidation and parti..l

liquefaction ; if healthy, not Phthisical, if unhealthy, often Phthisical;

and otherwise part of the Consumptive process—Scrofulous abscess

—Secondary suppuration and ulceration—Laryngeal Phthisis—Re-

lations of Fistula and other suppurating wounds to Phthisis—

Pyaemia . . . . . . . .67

CHAPTER X.

CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL VARIETIES OF PHTHISIS.

Inflammatory Phthinoplasms continued—Concrete and inactive Sarco-

phytes, in increased numbers, producing red and grey Indurations of

the lung: with more fibroid, tending to contract and wither: with

more corpuscles, tending to caseate and excavate—Origin from

different kinds of inflammation—Comparison with the lung indura-

tions described by Laennec, Andral, and T. Addison—Results con-

trasted with those of healthy bioplasm or healing . . .72

CHAPTER XL

CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL VARIETIES OF PHTHISIS.

Inflammatory Phthinoplasms, continued—Concrete Sarcophytes, more

abundant and lifeless, producing Caseous Hepatisation, or Scrofulous

Pneumonia, ending in speedy fatty softening and excavation—If

extensive, soon fatal; but if partial, arrested by evacuation and

cicatrization ; or becoming obsolete and calcified—Examples—Casea-

tion often not infecting the system . . . . .77
CHAPTER XII.

CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL VARIETIES OF PIITHISIS.

PaGB

Inflammatory Exudations, besides Sarcophytes and Fibroid; appear-

ing in the Expectoration—Catarrhal; marked by products of mucous

membrane, hyaline mucus, epithelial scales, and saline fluid, at-

tended with much irritation—Albuminous, uncoagulated and semi-

transparent; or coagulated and opaque, being pellicular, ramiform,

or curdy; resulting from over-distended blood-vessels—Hemor-

rhagic; characterised by admixture of red blood corpuscles; from

migration from inflamed vessels, as in early pneumonia, or from

altered hsematosine, as in scurvy . . . . .81

CHAPTER XIII.

CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL VARIETIES OF PHTHISIS,

Phthinoplasms in the lymphatic system, the chief seat of the Sarco-

phytes—This subject best illustrated by an examination of the late

researches on the Artificial production of Tubercle—Laennec's

observation—Experiments of Villemin, Andrew Clark, Bunion

Sanderson, and Wilson Fox—Summary of results of Dr. Fox's ex-

periments ; causes of success and failure considered—Some predispo-

sition in the animal necessary, as only certain kinds of animals

easily affected; and these chiefly by phthinoplastic, or by foul pus,

or other septic matter; but less frequently by wounds or mechanical

injuries, without any foreign animal matter—General conclusions:—

that in animals so treated is produced a blighting and decaying

change in portions of their bioplasm, which then become seeds of

new phthinoplasms in other parts—That the bioplasm or sarcophyte

of the lymphatic system is the first seat of this disseminated decay

—That septic influences in the body, or in the surrounding air, may

have a similar blighting or hiatolytic effect on the plastic material

of wounds or other inflammations from common causes, rendering

their products phthinoplastic and decaying, with a tendency to

further dissemination through the lymphaties—Observations of Drs.

Sanderson and Fox . . . . . . .84

CHAPTER XIV.

CLINICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL VARIETIES OF PHTHISIS.

Further conclusions on Artificial Tuberculisation in Animals, and on
the Causation of Phthisis in Man—Nature and progress of Arti-
ficial Infection—First local effect, the induration of sarcophytes—
Next effect on sarcophytes of lymphatic system, changing them—

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