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1 Work thou for pleasure ; paint or sing or carve
The thing thou lovest, though the body starve.
Who works for glory misses oft the goal;
Who works for money coins his very soul.
Work for the work's sake then, and it may be
That these things shall be added unto thee."

Kknyon Cox.

THE

DIVINA COMMEDIA

OF

JDANTE ALIGHIERI

TRANSLATED LINE FOR LINE IN THE TERZA RIMA
OF THE ORIGINAL

WITH NOTES

BY

FREDERICK K. H. HASELFOOT, M.A.

OF UNIVERSItY COLLEGE, OXFORD

SECOND EDITION
REVISED, CORRECTED, AND FURTHER ANNOTATED

LONDON

DUCKWORTH & CO.

3" HENRIETTA STREET, COVENT GARDEN, W.C.

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COPY OF A LETTER FROM THE LATE CARDINAL MANNING TO THE AUTHOR.

Archbishop's House,

Westminster, S.W.

Nov. 3. 1889.

Dear Mr Haselfoot,

I have now read through your translation of the Divina Commedia: and lose no time in telling you the result.

The careful criticism which you lent to me* is fully justified: and I accept it as it stands. I had believed that a rhymed translation of Dante was impossible: that is, that the tyranny of rhyme would have so forced the rendering as to make it .no longer Dante. But you have reproduced Dante with a singular closeness and a facility of rhyme which comes often as a surprise. Here and there I have felt the "tyranny of rhyme," but upon so large a field the number is hardly appreciable. In some instances it was like "Equus Tuticus" in the "Iter Brundusinum," of which Horace says "quod versu dicere non est."+

You have reproduced the abruptness and energy of the original in a high degree, and also the literalness of the translation. Long passages throughout, nevertheless, read off like an original poem of great

* Referring to an Article in The Church Quarterly Review for January, 1888, entitled "Two more Translations of the Divina Commedia."

+ Sat. I. v. 87.

V

beauty. And also there are a multitude of single lines which run like Dante's proverbs.

One other excellence is in the purity and simplicity of the English. Cary is latin is tic: but your diction is monosyllabic English.

The notes are very valuable, and to the point. I hope the book, which stands alone, may be appreciated. But like the Umbrian School of Painters such works are too high.

I have to thank you for the enjoyment of reading the Divina Commedia once more, and as it were at a sitting, with greatly increased wonder.

The Inferno and Purgatorio are wonderful; but the Paradiso for beauty, subtilty, delicacy, and elevation has no equal in uninspired poetry.

Believe me, always

Very truly your's,

Henry E. Card: Archbp.

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